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The idea is relatively simple, but I see some complications for implementations, so I'm wondering if it's even possible right now.

  • An example of what I'd like to do is to generate some data in a buffer, then map the contents of this buffer to a file. Instead of having the memory space virtually populated with the contents of the file, I'd like the contents of the original buffer to be transferred to the system cache (which should be a zero-copy operation) and dirtied immediately (which would flush the data out to disk eventually).

Of course the complication I mentioned is that the buffer should be deallocated and unmapped (since the data is now under the responsibility of the system cache), and I don't know how to do that either.

The important aspects are that:

  • The program can control when the file is created linked.
  • The program isn't required to anticipate the size of the file nor does it have to remap it as the dataset grows. Instead it can realloc the initial buffer (using an efficient memory allocator for this) until it is satisfied (it knows for sure that the dataset won't grow anymore) before finally mapping it to the file.
  • The data remains accessible through the same virtual memory address even after being mapped to the file, still without a single intra-memory copy.

One assumption is that:

  • We can use an arbitrary memory allocator (or memory management scheme in general) that can manage dynamic buffers more efficiently than mmap/mremap can for the memory space it manages, because the latter must deal with the filesystem to grow/shrink the file, which would always be slower.

So, (1) are these requirements too constrained? (2) Is this assumption correct?

PS: I had to arbitrarily pick the tags for this question, but I'm also interested in hearing how BSDs and Windows would do this. Of course if the POSIX API allows to do this already, that would be great.

Update: I call a buffer a space of private memory (private to the process/task in any OS with normal VMM) allocated in primary memory. The high-level goal involves generating a dataset of an arbitrary size using another input (in my case the network), then once it's generated, make it accessible for long periods of time (to the network and to the process itself), saving it to disk in the process.

  • If I keep the datasets in private memory and write them out normally, they'll just be swapped when the OS needs the space, which is a bit stupid since they're already on disk.
  • If I map another region then I have to copy the contents of the buffer to that region (which resides in the system cache), which, again, is a tad stupid since I won't use that buffer after that.

The alternative that I see is to write or use a full-blown userland cache reading and writing to the disk itself to ensure that (a) pages don't get uselessly swapped out and (b) the process doesn't hold too much memory for itself, which is never possible to do optimally anyway (better let the kernel do its job), and which is simply not a road I think is worth going down (too complex for less gains).

Update: Requirements 2 and 3 are non-issues considering Nominal Animal's answer. Of course this implies that the assumption is incorrect, as he proved is almost the case (overhead is minimal). I also relaxed requirement 1, O_TMPFILE is indeed perfect for this.

Update: A recent article on LWN mentions, somewhere in the middle: "That could possibly be done with a special write operation that would not actually cause I/O, or with a system call that would transfer a physical page into the page cache". That suggests that indeed, there is currently (April 2014) no way to do this at least with Linux (and likely other operating systems), much less with a standard API. The article is about PostgreSQL, but the issue in question is identical, except perhaps for the specific requirements to this question, which aren't defined in the article.

share|improve this question
2  
What do you call buffer? What is your high-level goal? – Maxim Egorushkin Aug 13 '13 at 16:11
    
See 'Update' for an answer to your questions and a bit of clarification. I'd also like some help on how to best go about this since I obviously did something wrong here (maybe just a small comment). Thanks. – tne Aug 13 '13 at 16:48
    
Create the target file, using posix_fallocate() to tell the OS how large the file will be; this reduces file fragmentation. Use posix_fadvise(, POSIX_FADV_RANDOM) to disable readahead for that file. Use low-level POSIX I/O (write()) to write the contents of your buffer to the file. Discard your buffer, reopen the file O_RDONLY, and map the file using mmap(NULL,length,PROT_READ,MAP_SHARED|MAP_NORESERVE,fd,0). In Linux, this will reuse the pages used to write to the file, and not use swap. If there is enough free RAM, the data is only copied once (memory to memory). Need an example? – Nominal Animal Aug 14 '13 at 1:52
    
@Nominal Animal Thanks for your comment, sorry for the delay. I think your solution is close to my second bullet point in my "update", minus your optimizations regarding filesystem allocation and proper swap usage. I would have loved avoiding that copy; I believe it's possible in theory, but I don't know if any API allows it. Thanks for offering to write an example, I think it's pretty intuitive, but feel free to do so for other people. For the lack of a better alternative, I might accept your answer after all. – tne Aug 19 '13 at 7:17
    
How about you use a memory map for the initial buffer? Create a "hidden" file (it has to be on the target filesystem), then map it using mmap(NULL,length,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED|MAP_NORESERVE,fd,0). The MAP_NORESERVE means the file will be used instead of swap. You can remap it (using ftruncate() to grow or shrink the backing file) via mremap(), similar to realloc(). When you wish to "save" it into a file, just rename the file, or hard-link it; both require the new name to be on the same filesystem (but not in the same directory). – Nominal Animal Aug 19 '13 at 15:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

This is not a satisfactory answer to the question; is is more of a continuation of the comment chain.

Here is a test program one can use to measure the overhead of using a file-backed memory map, instead of an anonymous memory map.

Note that the work() function listed just fills in the memory map with random data. To be more realistic, it should simulate at least the access patterns expected from real-world usage.

#define  _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L
#define  _GNU_SOURCE
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>

/* Xorshift random number generator.
*/

static uint32_t xorshift_state[4] = {
    123456789U,
    362436069U,
    521288629U,
    88675123U
};

static int xorshift_setseed(const void *const data, const size_t len)
{
    uint32_t state[4] = { 0 };

    if (len < 1)
        return ENOENT;
    else
    if (len < sizeof state)
        memcpy(state, data, len);
    else
        memcpy(state, data, sizeof state);

    if (state[0] || state[1] || state[2] || state[3]) {
        xorshift_state[0] = state[0];
        xorshift_state[1] = state[1];
        xorshift_state[2] = state[2];
        xorshift_state[3] = state[3];
        return 0;
    }

    return EINVAL;
}

static uint32_t xorshift_u32(void)
{
    const uint32_t temp = xorshift_state[0] ^ (xorshift_state[0] << 11U);
    xorshift_state[0] = xorshift_state[1];
    xorshift_state[1] = xorshift_state[2];
    xorshift_state[2] = xorshift_state[3];
    return xorshift_state[3] ^= (temp >> 8U) ^ temp ^ (xorshift_state[3] >> 19U);
}

/* Wallclock timing functions.
*/

static struct timespec wallclock_started;

static void wallclock_start(void)
{
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &wallclock_started);
}

static double wallclock_stop(void)
{
    struct timespec wallclock_stopped;
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &wallclock_stopped);
    return difftime(wallclock_stopped.tv_sec, wallclock_started.tv_sec)
         + (double)(wallclock_stopped.tv_nsec - wallclock_started.tv_nsec) / 1000000000.0;
}

/* Accessor function. This needs to read/modify/write the mapping,
 * simulating the actual work done onto the mapping.
*/
static void work(void *const area, size_t const length)
{
    uint32_t *const data = (uint32_t *)area;
    size_t          size = length / sizeof data[0];
    size_t          i;

    /* Add xorshift data. */
    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
        data[i] += xorshift_u32();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    long   page, size, delta, maxsize, steps;
    int    fd, result;
    void  *map, *old;
    char   dummy;
    double seconds;

    page = sysconf(_SC_PAGESIZE);

    if (argc < 5 || argc > 6 || !strcmp(argv[1], "-h") || !strcmp(argv[1], "--help")) {
        fprintf(stderr, "\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [ -h | --help ]\n", argv[0]);
        fprintf(stderr, "       %s MAPFILE SIZE DELTA MAXSIZE [ SEEDSTRING ]\n", argv[0]);
        fprintf(stderr, "Where:\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "       MAPFILE     backing file, '-' for none\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "       SIZE        initial map size\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "       DELTA       map size change\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "       MAXSIZE     final size of the map\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "       SEEDSTRING  seeds the Xorshift PRNG\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "Note: sizes must be page aligned, each page being %ld bytes.\n", (long)page);
        fprintf(stderr, "\n");
        return 1;
    }

    if (argc >= 6) {
        if (xorshift_setseed(argv[5], strlen(argv[5]))) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid seed string for the Xorshift generator.\n", argv[5]);
            return 1;
        } else {
            fprintf(stderr, "Xorshift initialized with { %lu, %lu, %lu, %lu }.\n",
                            (unsigned long)xorshift_state[0],
                            (unsigned long)xorshift_state[1],
                            (unsigned long)xorshift_state[2],
                            (unsigned long)xorshift_state[3]);
            fflush(stderr);
        }
    }

    if (sscanf(argv[2], " %ld %c", &size, &dummy) != 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid map size.\n", argv[2]);
        return 1;
    } else
    if (size < page || size % page) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Map size must be a multiple of page size (%ld).\n", argv[2], page);
        return 1;
    }

    if (sscanf(argv[3], " %ld %c", &delta, &dummy) != 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid map size change.\n", argv[2]);
        return 1;
    } else
    if (delta % page) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Map size change must be a multiple of page size (%ld).\n", argv[3], page);
        return 1;
    }

    if (delta) {
        if (sscanf(argv[4], " %ld %c", &maxsize, &dummy) != 1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid final map size.\n", argv[3]);
            return 1;
        } else
        if (maxsize < page || maxsize % page) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: Final map size must be a multiple of page size (%ld).\n", argv[4], page);
            return 1;
        }

        steps = (maxsize - size) / delta;
        if (steps < 0L)
            steps = -steps;

    } else {
        maxsize = size;
        steps = 0L;
    }

    /* Time measurement includes the file open etc. overheads.
    */
    wallclock_start();

    if (strlen(argv[1]) < 1 || !strcmp(argv[1], "-"))
        fd = -1;
    else {
        do {
            fd = open(argv[1], O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_EXCL, 0600);
        } while (fd == -1 && errno == EINTR);
        if (fd == -1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s.\n", argv[1], strerror(errno));
            return 1;
        }

        do {
            result = ftruncate(fd, (off_t)size);
        } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
        if (result == -1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s.\n", argv[1], strerror(errno));
            unlink(argv[1]);
            do {
                result = close(fd);
            } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
            return 1;
        }

        result = posix_fadvise(fd, 0, size, POSIX_FADV_RANDOM);
    }

    /* Initial mapping. */
    if (fd == -1)
        map = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, fd, 0);
    else
        map = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED | MAP_NORESERVE, fd, 0);
    if (map == MAP_FAILED) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Memory map failed: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
        if (fd != -1) {
            unlink(argv[1]);
            do {
                result = close(fd);
            } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
        }
        return 1;
    }
    result = posix_madvise(map, size, POSIX_MADV_RANDOM);

    work(map, size);

    while (steps-->0L) {

        if (fd != -1) {
            do {
                result = ftruncate(fd, (off_t)(size + delta));
            } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
            if (result == -1) {
                fprintf(stderr, "%s: Cannot grow file: %s.\n", argv[1], strerror(errno));
                unlink(argv[1]);
                do {
                    result = close(fd);
                } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
                return 1;
            }
            result = posix_fadvise(fd, 0, size, POSIX_FADV_RANDOM);
        }

        old = map;
        map = mremap(map, size, size + delta, MREMAP_MAYMOVE);
        if (map == MAP_FAILED) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Cannot remap memory map: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
            munmap(old, size);
            if (fd != -1) {
                unlink(argv[1]);
                do {
                    result = close(fd);
                } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
            }
            return 1;
        }
        size += delta;
        result = posix_madvise(map, size, POSIX_MADV_RANDOM);

        work(map, size);
    }

    /* Timing does not include file renaming.
    */
    seconds = wallclock_stop();

    munmap(map, size);
    if (fd != -1) {
        unlink(argv[1]);
        do {
            result = close(fd);
        } while (result == -1 && errno == EINTR);
    }

    printf("%.9f seconds elapsed.\n", seconds);
    return 0;
}

If you save the above as bench.c, you can compile it using

gcc -W -Wall -O3 bench.c -lrt -o bench

Run it without parameters to see the usage.

On my machine, on ext4 filesystem, running tests

./bench - 4096 4096 4096000
./bench testfile 4096 4096 4096000

yields 1.307 seconds wall clock time for the anonymous memory map, and 1.343 seconds for the file-backed memory map, meaning the file backed mapping is about 2.75% slower.

This test starts with one page memory map, then enlarges it by one page a thousand times. For tests like 4096000 4096 8192000 the difference is even smaller. The time measured does include constructing the initial file (and using posix_fallocate() to allocate the blocks on disk for the file).

Running the test on tmpfs, on ext4 over swRAID0, and on ext4 over swRAID1, on the same machine, does not seem to affect the results; all differences are lost in the noise.

While I would prefer to test this on multiple machines and kernel versions before making any sweeping statements, I do know something about how the kernel manages these memory maps. Therefore, I shall make the following claim, based on above and my own experience:

Using a file-backed memory map will not cause a significant slowdown compared to an anonymous memory map, or even compared to malloc()/realloc()/free(). I expect the difference to be under 5% in all real-world use cases, and at most 1% for typical real-world use cases; less, if the resizes are rare compared to how often the map is accessed.

To user2266481 the above means it should be acceptable to just create a temporary file on the target filesystem, to hold the memory map. (Note that it is possible to create the temporary file without allowing anyone access to it, mode 0, as access mode is only checked when opening the file.) When the contents are in final form, ftruncate() and msync() the contents, then hard-link the final file to the temporary file using link(). Finally, unlink the temporary file and close the temporary file descriptor, and the task should be completed with near-optimal efficiency.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually this might be a very satisfactory answer for my needs. I can reproduce your results, but I'm using a virtual machine on a host and hypervisor that I don't know the inner workings of. I will test as soon as possible on a native machine and report back some numbers as well. I tried to test for the worst case by msync'ing with MS_ASYNC after each work unit, which made things consistently faster (and confused me). Definitely interesting. – tne Aug 26 '13 at 10:31
    
@user2266481: Aside from certain performance regressions in specific kernel versions fixed very soom in later versions, I would be very surprised to find any contrary results to my post above. It's a pretty common workload, and therefore the Linux kernel will try to perform it well. As to MS_ASYNC: the code tells the kernel the data will be accessed randomly, to simulate "worst case". Change to POSIX_[FM]ADV_NORMAL or POSIX_[FM]ADV_SEQUENTIAL, and perhaps preload the next work unit using POSIX_MADV_WILLNEED, for better performance for your specific workload. – Nominal Animal Aug 26 '13 at 13:49
    
@tne: Thanks for the bounty :) In case you (or others) wonder about it, the "anonymous inode" (O_TMPFILE) support in future Linux kernels (3.11 and later) does not change the situation. It does provide a method of making the mapped file inaccessible (by others) during dataset building, but that's it. On the other hand, in Linux, you can use file leases to delay other processes from accessing the mapped file (for up to /proc/sys/fs/lease-break-time seconds); long enough to for example destroy the data via ftruncate() if so desired. Let me know if you want an example of this. – Nominal Animal Aug 28 '13 at 15:45
    
Yes, O_TMPFILE with linkat is great though, I've been wanting exactly this for a long time (these notes look funny now). The name is a bit unfortunate. Didn't know about lease-break-time until now, am I correct though that you're suggesting this as an alternative for systems that don't yet support O_TMPFILE [A]? (Ignoring forked children.) – tne Aug 29 '13 at 14:59
    
[B] About worst-case testing, I actually wanted to make sure the code didn't incur useless writes to the system during processing of the whole workload. The system periodically flushes these pages, MS_ASYNC was really meant to force it to do so a lot. It's really apparent with MS_SYNC, obviously (+20s on the same test) but irrelevant. It's hard to test because it doesn't influence the process itself that much (actually makes it go faster for some reason), but does impact on the system and thus other instances of the program (at least that's what I want to determine). – tne Aug 29 '13 at 15:00

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