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I would like to interpolate multiple user inputs of (x, y) over the following data:

            | >=0 1    2   3    4   5    >=6
   -------------------------------------------
   >=09 <10 | 6.4 5.60 4.8 4.15 3.5 2.85 2.2
   >=10 <11 | 5.3 4.50 3.7 3.05 2.4 1.75 1.1
   >=11 <12 | 4.7 3.85 3.0 2.35 1.7 1.05 0.4
       >=12 | 4.2 3.40 2.6 1.95 1.3 0.65 0.0

IF a user enters x = 2.5 and y = 9, the model should return 4.475. On the other hand if the user enters x = 2.5 and y = 9.5, the model should return 3.925.

I used map_coordinates as it provides the ability to map coordinates to an x,y range

Here is what I have done so far:

import numpy as np
from scipy.ndimage import map_coordinates

# define array
z = np.array([[6.4, 5.60, 4.8, 4.15, 3.5, 2.85, 2.2],
              [5.3, 4.50, 3.7, 3.05, 2.4, 1.75, 1.1],
              [4.7, 3.85, 3.0, 2.35, 1.7, 1.05, 0.4],
              [4.2, 3.40, 2.6, 1.95, 1.3, 0.65, 0.0]])

# function to interpolate
def twoD_interpolate(arr, xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, x1, y1):
    """
    interpolate in two dimensions with "hard edges"
    """
    nx, ny = arr.shape
    x1 = np.array([x1], dtype=np.float)
    y1 = np.array([y1], dtype=np.float)

    # if x1 is out of bounds set its value to its closest point, so that we're always
    # interpolating within the range
    x1[x1 > xmax] = xmax
    x1[x1 < xmin] = xmin

    # if y1 is out of bounds set its value to its closest point, so that we're always
    # interpolating within the range
    y1[y1 > ymax] = ymax
    y1[y1 < ymin] = ymin

    # convert x1 and y1 to indices so we can map over them
    x1 = (nx - 1) * (x1 - xmin) / (xmax - xmin)
    y1 = (ny - 2) * (y1 - ymin) / (ymax - ymin)
    y1[y1 > 1] = 2.0

    return map_coordinates(arr, [y1, x1])

# function to get the value
def test_val(x, y, arr):
    return twoD_interpolate(arr, 0, 6, 9, 12, x, y)

Testing the Code

print test_val(4, 11, z) --> 3.00
print test_val(2, 10, z) --> 3.85

These results are incorrect as they should return 1.7 and 3.7 respectively

Any ideas or thoughts on what I did wrong?

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2  
np.clip(x1, xmin, xmax, out=x1) is a better option for your clipping of the input values. –  Jaime Aug 13 '13 at 18:53
    
@Jaime so I should two np.clip, one for x1 and oen for y1? –  dassouki Aug 14 '13 at 12:00
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using your function:

def twoD_interpolate(arr, xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax, x1, y1):
    """
    interpolate in two dimensions with "hard edges"
    """
    ny, nx = arr.shape  # Note the order of ny and xy

    x1 = np.atleast_1d(x1)
    y1 = np.atleast_1d(y1)

    # Change coordinates to match your array.
    x1 = (x1 - xmin) * (nx - 1) / float(xmax - xmin)
    y1 = (y1 - ymin) * (ny - 1) / float(ymax - ymin)

    # order=1 is required to return your examples.
    # mode='nearest' prevents the need for clip
    return map_coordinates(arr, np.vstack((y1, x1)), order=1, mode='nearest')

# function to get the value
def test_val(x, y, arr):
    return twoD_interpolate(arr, 0, 6, 9, 12, x, y)

Now lets run a few test:

print test_val(4, 11, z)
[ 1.7]

print test_val(2, 10, z)
[ 3.7]

print test_val(2.5, 9, z)
[ 4.475]

print test_val(2.5, 9.5, z)
[ 3.925]

#Can even use 1D numpy arrays now
print test_val(np.arange(4),np.arange(4)+9,z)
[ 6.4   4.5   3.    1.95]

To explain:

np.atleast_1d is a function that ensures that your array is of at least 1 dimension. np.array([x1]) will return a 2D array if x1 is a numpy array. This is not desired.

>>> np.atleast_1d(5)
array([5])
>>> np.atleast_1d(np.arange(5))
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])

Setting order=1 refers to the spline interpolation order. In the above you showed linear interpolation hence 1 if you would like to take more values into account you can increase this to reach the desired effect.

The np.vstack is used to correctly position the x and y indices. In this terminology map_coordinates wants the data as:

coords=[[y1,y2,y3,...
        [x1,y2,y3,...]]

ycoords,xcoords=['y1','y2','y3'],['x1','x2','x3']
>>> np.vstack((xcoords,ycoords))
array([['y1', 'y2','y3'],
       ['x1', 'x2','x3']],
      dtype='|S2')
share|improve this answer
    
CAn you in a sentence or two explain the importance of using np.vstack, np.atleast_1d, and order=1? –  dassouki Aug 15 '13 at 0:11
1  
Updated with some explanation. –  Ophion Aug 15 '13 at 0:42
    
I'm not sure if my other question is related to this one or not. would you mind checking please? –  dassouki Aug 17 '13 at 15:34
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