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I'm interested to find out why i always have to do this

$scope.$watch( function() {
   return $scope.someData;
}, function( value ) {
   console.log( value );
});

for angular to actually watch the data, why do I have to do this, this is one of the things that really bug me because it looks pointless.

If I do something like this

$scope.$watch($scope.someData, function( value ) {
   console.log( value );
});

Which is nicer, it never works?

I also use this a lot with factories

say that $data is a factory I have to do

$scope.$watch( function() {
   return $data.someData;
}, function( value ) {
   console.log( value );
});
share|improve this question
1  
do: $scope.$watch('someData', function (... – Yoshi Aug 13 '13 at 16:49
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This works:

$scope.$watch("someData", function( value ) {
   console.log( value );
});
share|improve this answer
    
Cool, what about with a factory? – iConnor Aug 13 '13 at 16:52
    
I guess you can assign the factory return to a model and watch that model. – CodeHater Aug 13 '13 at 16:54

I guess it's worth mentioning that passing a function to $watch is useful when you want to monitor a condition:

$scope.$watch(function() { 
    return $scope.data.length > 0; 
}, function() {
    // Do something every time $scope.data.length > 0 changes
});

or

$scope.$watch(function() { 
    return $scope.prop1 && $scope.prop2;
}, function() {
    // Do something every time $scope.prop1 && $scope.prop2 changes
});
share|improve this answer
    
That's very useful to know, thanks. – iConnor Aug 13 '13 at 18:22
    
I've just reworded the comments in the code. The callback function is called every time the condition changes, not every time it becomes true. – Michael Benford Aug 13 '13 at 18:29
    
In the second example. it will fire whenever each of them change right. not both of them? – iConnor Aug 20 '13 at 17:34
    
It'll fire whenever $scope.prop1 && $scope.prop2 changes. If one side changes but the condition as a whole doesn't, it won't. For instance, if both $scope.prop1 and $scope.prop2 are false and one of them becomes true, the expression remains false and the watch callback won't get called. – Michael Benford Aug 20 '13 at 18:10
    
Oh, ok cool, thanks :) – iConnor Aug 20 '13 at 18:11

With a factory, you need to watch a function because if you pass a string, Angular will evaluate it as an expression against the $scope. Since $data.someData is not defined on your $scope, it won't work.

To elaborate on @Codezilla's comment, you could assign your factory data to some $scope property, and then watch that:

$scope.data = $data.someData;
$scope.$watch('data', function(newValue) { ... });
share|improve this answer

Since the how-to-do answer is already given, I'll try to explain you what goes on actually and why it didn't work the way you tried at first time.

First of all this code sure works,

$scope.$watch(function() {
   return $scope.someData;
}, function(value) {
   console.log(value);
});

But this is NOT the perfect way. To be more precise $watch injects the scope in the function, like this,

$scope.$watch(function(injectedScope) {
   return injectedScope.someData;
}, function(value) {
   console.log(value);
});

Previously it works because $scope and injectScope are one and the same thing.

Now as this article explains,

Since $scope is passed into the watch function, it means that we can watch any function that expects the scope as an argument and returns a value in response. A great example of this is $interpolate function.

So in your case, we can also make use of $interpolate as following:

$scope.$watch($interpolate("{{someData}}"), function(value) {
    ...
});

Now this is where we come to the short-hand method of using just a watch expression. $watch can also accept an expression, which actually is interpolated.

Thus by providing $scope.$watch("someData", ... ),

someData will be:

  1. interpolated as {{someData}}
  2. using the scope injected by $watch function

This is a nice, clean, readable, short-hand way of writing the expression instead of the actual function. But finally after all such compilations, it is ultimately the function which returns a value to watch.

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