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i have a 512x512 matrix .i want to convert the 1/4 the elements of that matrix to 0/how can i do it can anyone help.my program is as folows

clc;
clear all;
close all;
a=imread('images.jpg');
b=rgb2gray(a);
figure,imshow(b);
c=double(b);
figure,imshow(a);
figure,imshow(c);
d=rand(512,512);
e=exp(2*pi*d);
f=c.*e;
%figure,imshow(f);
g=fft2(f);
h=rand(512,512);
i=exp(2*pi*h);
j=g.*i;
k=fft2(j)

%here k is a matrix of order 512x512.in next step i want to chanage the 1/4 elements to ero can anyone help

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3 Answers 3

If you want the points chosen randomly:

If you have a 512 x 512 array:

v=randperm(512^2);
v=v(1:512*128);
k(v)=0;

The above can be abbreviated in recent matlab versions to

k(randperm(512^2,512*64))=0;

Edit

More generally, for an image array "k"

(case size(k) is Nc x Nr)

Ns = numel(k);
v=randperm(Ns);   
v=v(1:round(Ns/4));
k(v) = 0;

or in recent version of matlab

Ns = numel(k);
k(randperm(Ns,round(Ns/4)))=0; 

(case size(k) is Nc x Nr x 3)

Ns = numel(k)/3;
v=randperm(Ns);   
v=v(1:round(Ns/4));
k(v)=0;
k(v+Ns)=0;
k(v+Ns*2)=0;
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I would never recommend hard-coding values like this. And also he does not have a depth 3 matrix because he does an rgb2gray call. –  MZimmerman6 Aug 13 '13 at 21:02
1  
@MZimmerman6 Absolutely right, I made a few changes accordingly. –  Try Hard Aug 14 '13 at 8:30

The simplest way is to set a block of elements to zero.

k(1:256, 1:256) = 0;

If you want and even distribution of zeros you can to the following.

k(1:2:512, 1:2:512) = 0;
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ok this is the ans what i need now can u pls help me .i just need to explain this code so how did u take 256 in the first code.is it the one corresponding to 1/4 the of my matrix? –  Sidhartha Ramachandran Aug 13 '13 at 17:24
    
@SidharthaRamachandran You want one quarter of the total. Thus you could take one half in one direction and one half in the other direction. (one half times one half is one quarter) –  Dennis Jaheruddin Aug 14 '13 at 13:47
    
@DennisJaheruddin this may not always be true, because if you cancel in one direction in one operation and then do it again in another operation, you may have overlap, which means you can not guarantee exact percentages –  MZimmerman6 Aug 14 '13 at 13:49
    
@MZimmerman6 Not sure if I understand your comment, but if you take half the points in each direction (like in this answer) it should always be fine (assuming the length and width are even; otherwise one quarter is not even really defined). Of course you cannot simply take half in the same direction twice. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Aug 14 '13 at 13:56
    
@DennisJaheruddin you are thinking similarly. What I meant was if you randomly zero 50% of all elements from each row, and then resave the matrix off, and then randomly zero 50% of all elements in each column. This will not guarantee a 25% zero matrix. Which I thought was what you were saying –  MZimmerman6 Aug 14 '13 at 13:59

A much simpler and more robust solution that is not so hard-coded would be the one I have posted below, where x is the array you have

x = rand(100);
perc = 0.25;
x(randperm(numel(x),round(numel(x)*perc))) = 0;

This is more robust and is not dependent on the size of x being declared, it can find that on its own.

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why would it not? –  MZimmerman6 Aug 14 '13 at 13:35
    
My bad, indeed it should work fine. I was confused because you generate x with each entry having a 1 in 4 chance to be less than perc. However, that property is not used at all. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Aug 14 '13 at 13:44
    
I generate x as just a 100x100 random matrix, and then do cancellation. Basically the only reason x is even declared in my example is so that someone can just copy and paste those 3 lines and get a matrix that is 25% 0's –  MZimmerman6 Aug 14 '13 at 13:47

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