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I'm starting out with game development, and to get the hang of things, I figured using GLFW would be a good place to begin. I followed a basic tutorial, and have a simple game with some basic functionality.

My issue is in the tutorial, when the OpenGL window is set up, it uses a fixed vert for glBufferData:


typedef struct {
    GLfloat positionCoordinates[3];
    GLfloat textureCoordiantes[2];

} VertexData;

VertexData vertices[] = {
    {{0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f}, {0.0f, 0.0f}},
    {{50.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f}, {1.0f, 0.0f}},
    {{50.0f, 50.0f, 0.0f}, {1.0f, 1.0f}},
    {{0.0f, 50.0f, 0.0f}, {0.0f, 1.0f}}
};

void GameWindow::setupGL() {
    glClearColor(0.05f, 0.05f, 0.05f, 1.0f);
    glViewport(0, 0, _width, _height);

    glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);
    glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    gluOrtho2D(0, _width, 0, _height);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

    glGenBuffers(1, &_vertexBufferID);
    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _vertexBufferID);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(vertices), vertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

    glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(VertexData), (GLvoid *) offsetof(VertexData, positionCoordinates));

    glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
    glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, sizeof(VertexData), (GLvoid *) offsetof(VertexData, textureCoordiantes));

}

From what I understand, this is correct practice, which makes sense, but all the textures that are loaded conform to this size. So even though the images have a different resolution, they are still stretched to that vert's specifications.


GLuint GameWindow::loadAndBufferImage(const char *filename) {
    GLFWimage imageData;
    glfwReadImage(filename, &imageData, NULL);

    GLuint textureBufferID;
    glGenTextures(1, &textureBufferID);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, textureBufferID);
    std::cout << "Width:" << imageData.Width << " Height:" << imageData.Height << std::endl;
    glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, imageData.Width, imageData.Height, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, imageData.Data);

    glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
    glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
    glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);
    glTexParameterf(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);

    glfwFreeImage(&imageData);

    return textureBufferID;
}

I know this has to be a pretty fundamental aspect of OpenGL, but how can I load these images without them becoming distorted?


Edit: Here's the render function for the sprites (uses bufferID returned by loadAndBufferImage())

void Sprite::render() {
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, _textureBufferID);

    glLoadIdentity();

    glTranslatef(_position.x, _position.y, 0);
    glRotatef(_rotation, 0, 0, 1.0f);

    glDrawArrays(GL_QUADS, 0, 4);
}

Edit 2:

glBegin(GL_QUADS);
    glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(0,0,0);
    glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 0.0f); glVertex3f(width,0,0);
    glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 1.0f); glVertex3f(width,height,0);
    glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 1.0f); glVertex3f(0,height,0);   
glEnd();
share|improve this question
    
In what way are your textures being distorted? They are mapped to stretch exactly 1 time across your quads in this example. If you want to alter the size of your quad based on sprite image dimensions you should scale your geometry accordingly. –  Andon M. Coleman Aug 13 '13 at 19:45
    
@AndonM.Coleman Just being enlarged to vertices's size. So would it be best to create a member variable with the sprite's dimensions, and render using that? Also if glDrawArray is ultimately responsible for rendering, should I use something similar to the code found in my second edit? –  iRector Aug 13 '13 at 20:00
    
Functionally, yes the code in Edit 2 would do the trick. In practice, though, do not use immediate mode (glBegin (...) / glEnd (...)) :) In the far future, you could avoid all of this if you used a vertex shader. In shaders you can test (textureSize (...) instruction) or pass the dimensions of your texture and modify your vertex positions at render-time, instead of by modifying your vertex buffer. –  Andon M. Coleman Aug 13 '13 at 21:42
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