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So what I am trying to do if a result in my select has the same post_data_id as another post_id remove that result but show one of them. I've been trying for days to try to get this to work but have failed miserably. Please check my SQL Fiddle asweel as the screenshot for what I mean

View the SQLFiddle SQLFiddle Screenshot

Thanks

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Looking at your data it appears that when the post_data_id is non-null, it is always recurrent in the post_id column. Is this not the case? If this is the case, simply filter out non-null post_data_id rows. –  eatonphil Aug 13 '13 at 19:12
3  
nice use of sql fiddle, a very helpful way to ask a question! –  quantka Aug 13 '13 at 19:27
1  
The query in my answer satisfies the specified requirements, demonstrated here. SQLFiddle http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/fed8a/86 It's probably not the most efficient query that will return the specified resultset (since it uses your original query as an inline view), but the query does operate only on the rows returned by your original query. –  spencer7593 Aug 13 '13 at 20:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's likely a simpler method for this, but you could use:

SELECT p.* 
FROM posts p 
LEFT JOIN following f 
    ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
WHERE (post_user_id=1 
    OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL) 
    AND (POST_DATA_ID NOT IN (SELECT POST_ID
                              FROM posts p 
                              LEFT JOIN following f 
                                  ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
                              WHERE (post_user_id=1 
                                  OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL))
        OR POST_DATA_ID IS NULL)
ORDER BY `post_id` DESC;

SQL Fiddle

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Thanks works great :D –  arberb Aug 14 '13 at 0:23

You can't really DELETE and SELECT in one statement. You will always need to execute two statements consecutively.

I am not sure which rows you wanted to delete (the duplicate post_id or the duplicate post_data_id), but you're going to need two of the following four statements:

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE post_data_id IN (
SELECT post_id FROM posts);

SELECT * FROM posts WHERE post_id IN (
SELECT post_data_id FROM posts);

DELETE FROM posts WHERE post_data_id IN (
SELECT post_id FROM posts);

DELETE FROM posts WHERE post_id IN (
SELECT post_data_id FROM posts);
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He doesn't mean to delete. He means to only show one. –  eatonphil Aug 13 '13 at 19:13
2  
His English isn't very clear, but he says 'remove that result but show one of them'. Remove implies DELETE. –  Luc van Donkersgoed Aug 13 '13 at 19:14
2  
I think its pretty clear that OP wants to "hide" the rows; he only wants to "remove" the rows from the results of his query, and NOT delete them from the table. A DELETE and a SELECT can appear in one statement. (A DELETE statement can include one or more SELECT, that's valid and useful.) I think what you meant was, a DELETE statement can't return a resultset. –  spencer7593 Aug 13 '13 at 19:35

You can use NOT EXISTS with a select back to the same table:

Using the query from your fiddle:

SELECT 
  p.* 
FROM
  posts p 
LEFT JOIN following f 
   ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
WHERE 
  (post_user_id=1 
       OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL) 
  and not exists (select 'x'
                from posts posts_2
               where p.post_data_id = posts_2.post_id)
ORDER BY `post_id` DESC
share|improve this answer

Try this. I added a group by for post_id since you want that column to be unique. I assume that the post_type etc column values are guaranteed to be the same if the post_ids are the same, therefore you can safely aggregate them using some function, like MAX.

SELECT p.post_id, MAX(p.post_type), MAX(p.post_user_id), MAX(p.post_data_id) 
FROM posts p 
LEFT JOIN following f 
ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
WHERE (post_user_id=1 
       OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL) 
GROUP BY p.post_id
ORDER BY `post_id` DESC;
share|improve this answer
    
Note: if you look at the data, (say for POST_ID 166) you'll see post_user_id and post_type definitely vary for a related post_data_id. –  user645280 Aug 13 '13 at 20:03
    
My bad, but then it isn't really well defined what the OP means by "but show one of them", which one? –  quantka Aug 13 '13 at 20:07

There are quite a few problems with this query but I think the notion may have potential:

SELECT -- p.* 
  GROUP_CONCAT(post_id) AS POST_IDs,
  GROUP_CONCAT(post_type) AS POST_TYPEs,
  GROUP_CONCAT(post_user_id) AS POST_USER_IDs,
  GROUP_CONCAT(post_data_id) AS POST_DATA_IDs
FROM posts p
LEFT JOIN following f
       ON p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
WHERE 1 IN (p.post_user_id, f.user_id)
GROUP BY LEAST(POST_ID,COALESCE(POST_DATA_ID, POST_ID))
ORDER BY post_id DESC;

Main problem is knowing which POST_ID or POST_TYPE or POST_USER_ID to use in a given row.

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Here's one way to get the specified result, using your original query as an inline view. (Actually, the query references your original query two times. I removed the ORDER BY from the original query. It's not required that it be removed, but it's also not necessary for it to be there.

SELECT a.*
  FROM (
         SELECT p.*
         FROM posts p
         LEFT JOIN following f
         ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id
         WHERE (post_user_id=1
                OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL)
       ) a
  LEFT
  JOIN (
         SELECT p.*
         FROM posts p
         LEFT JOIN following f
         ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id
         WHERE (post_user_id=1
                OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL)
       ) b
    ON b.post_id = a.post_data_id
 WHERE b.post_id IS NULL
 ORDER BY a.post_id DESC;

There may be more efficient ways to get the same result, but this query satisfies the requirements. It uses a classic angi-join pattern: a LEFT [OUTER] JOIN to find matching rows, and a predicate in the WHERE clause to eliminate the rows that had a match.

e.g. to get rows from p where there is no matching row in q

SELECT p.*
  FROM p
  LEFT
  JOIN q
    ON q.id = p.q_id
 WHERE q.id IS NULL
share|improve this answer
SELECT p.* 
FROM posts p 
LEFT JOIN following f 
ON f.user_id=1 AND p.post_user_id = f.follower_id 
LEFT JOIN post x
ON p.post_data_id=x.post_id
WHERE (p.post_user_id=1 
   OR f.follower_id IS NOT NULL) 
AND x.post_id is null
ORDER BY p.post_id DESC;
share|improve this answer
    
removes more data than necessary. second left join kills it. –  Lobo Aug 13 '13 at 19:18

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