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With the following sample code containing @property decorators:

class Grade_Calculator(object):
    def __init__(self,score):
        self.score = score

    @property
    def grade(self):
        if self.score in range(60,70):
            grade = 'D'
        elif self.score in range(70,80):
            grade = 'C'
        elif self.score in range(80,90):
            grade = 'B'
        elif self.score in range(90,101):
            grade = 'A'
        return grade

    @property
    def failure(self):
        if self.score < 60:
            print 'See me'
            grade = 'F'
            return grade

and an instance:

g = Grade_Calculator(28)

g.grade returns an UnboundLocalError. I would like to call failure() within grade() to avoid this error.

With an instance:

g = Grade_Calculator(89)

g.failure() fails silently. I would like to call grade() within failure() to act as a fail-safe in this situation.

I've seen a lot of references to just doing self.method() calls, but they're not working for me and I think the presence of the decorator is screwing me up somehow:

@property
def grade(self):
    if self.score < 60:
        self.failure()
    elif self.score in range(60,70):
        grade = 'D'
    elif self.score in range(70,80):
        grade = 'C'
    elif self.score in range(80,90):
        grade = 'B'
    elif self.score in range(90,101):
        grade = 'A'
    return grade

g = Grade_Calculator(28)
g.grade
See me
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-667-fb10e6cf27d4> in <module>()
----> 1 g.grade

./sample.py in grade(self)
      6     def grade(self):
      7         if self.score < 60:
----> 8             self.failure()
      9         elif self.score in range(60,70):
     10             grade = 'D'

TypeError: 'str' object is not callable

What am I not understanding?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have defined failure as a property. Therefore, you can't call it using () notation; in fact, not doing that is kinda the whole point of using a property. self.failure returns 'F' and you then try to call it, which is why you get the error about not being able to call a string. It's as if you wrote 'F'() which is an obvious mistake.

Also, you're throwing away the value you get from failure and you're only returning a value in the case of failure (which means you get None otherwise). Of course you only access failure if you have a failing grade to begin with... in which case you don't need to check that condition inside failure, now do you?

Also, printing stuff in properties is pretty bad style. You don't expect something to be printed when you access an attribute. Separation of concerns: something outside of the class should probably be doing the printing, or you should have a separate method to call to print whatever is returned by grade.

I'd rewrite your class as follows:

class Grade_Calculator(object):
    def __init__(self, score):
        self.score = score

    @property
    def grade(self):
        if self.failure:
            return 'F'
        if 60 <= self.score < 70:
            return 'D'
        if 70 <= self.score < 80:
            return 'C'
        if 80 <= self.score < 90:
            return 'B'
        if 90 <= self.score < 100:
            return 'A'

    @property
    def failure(self):
        return self.score < 60   # returns True or False

    def print_grade(self):
        print self.grade, "- see me" * self.failure

if __name__ == '__main__':
    c = Grade_Calculator(71)
    c.print_grade()
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"You have defined failure as a property. Therefore, you can't call it using () notation; in fact, not doing that is kinda the whole point of using a property."... lightbulb moment for me -- thanks. Accepted for thoroughness of answer, although @Paco's was good too. –  verbsintransit Aug 13 '13 at 20:39
class Grade_Calculator(object):
    def __init__(self, score):
        self.score = score

    @property
    def grade(self):
        grade = self.failure
        if 60 <= self.score < 70:
            grade = 'D'
        elif 70 <= self.score < 80:
            grade = 'C'
        elif 80 <= self.score < 90:
            grade = 'B'
        elif 90 <= self.score < 100:
            grade = 'A'
        return grade

    @property
    def failure(self):
        if self.score < 60:
            print 'See me'
            grade = 'F'
            return grade

if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = Grade_Calculator(71)
    print a.grade

You're basically creating a new attribute to your object with the failure method. And you're never trying to get its value, that is why you'll never see 'See me' By the way, you're overriding the value of grade which was initially an integer. You converted it to a string ('A', 'B', 'C', ...) The code I provided works, but I changed a few things. There is no need to call range (this is expensive). You can use value < variable < other_value in Python

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