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It's possible I don't understand Node's event loop well enough.

Say I have a function foo which contains an asynchronous function async_func. Do I have

//1
function foo(callback) {
       //stuff here
       async_func(function() {
            //do something
            callback();
       });
//this eventually get executed
}

or

//2
function foo(callback) {
       //stuff here
       async_func(function() {
            //do something
            return callback();
       });
//never executed
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually, in your sample 2, //never executed will be execute every time. It's returning from the callback, not from the wrapping function.

Sometimes the caller actually expects some return value and the behavior can change based on that. Another common reason to see a return callback() is just a clear way of short circuiting the function you're in. For example.

function doSomething(callback) {
    something(function(err, data) {
        if(err) return callback(err);
        // Only run if no error
    });
    // Always run
}

Even though the return value isn't being used, it's using return to ensure that execution doesn't continue past the error conditional. You could just as easily write it this way which has the same effect.

function doSomething(callback) {
    something(function(err, data) {
        if(err) {
            callback(err);
            return;
        }
        // Only run if no error 
    });
    // Always run
}
share|improve this answer
    
That helps mucho lol. Thanks –  Colin Aug 13 '13 at 19:52
    
@Timothy, good answer but the _.find is misleading and I would suggest you remove it. _.find is synchronous and does not take a callback. It takes an iterator function, uses it while processing, but then still returns a result synchronously. This example will just confuse people. –  Peter Lyons Aug 13 '13 at 19:59
    
@PeterLyons Good point. Removed. –  Timothy Strimple Aug 13 '13 at 20:08

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