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I've been trying to learn Go on my own, but I've been stumped on trying read from and write to ordinary files.

I can get as far as inFile,_ := os.Open(INFILE,0,0);, but actually getting the content of the file doesn't make sense, because the read function takes a []byte as a parameter.

func (file *File) Read(b []byte) (n int, err Error)
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7 Answers 7

up vote 209 down vote accepted

Let's make a Go 1-compatible list of all the ways to read and write files in Go.

Because file API has changed recently and most other answers don't work with Go 1. They also miss bufio which is important IMHO.

In the following examples I copy a file by reading from it and writing to the destination file.

Start with the basics

package main

import (
    "io"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    // open input file
    fi, err := os.Open("input.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    // close fi on exit and check for its returned error
    defer func() {
        if err := fi.Close(); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }()

    // open output file
    fo, err := os.Create("output.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    // close fo on exit and check for its returned error
    defer func() {
        if err := fo.Close(); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }()

    // make a buffer to keep chunks that are read
    buf := make([]byte, 1024)
    for {
        // read a chunk
        n, err := fi.Read(buf)
        if err != nil && err != io.EOF {
            panic(err)
        }
        if n == 0 {
            break
        }

        // write a chunk
        if _, err := fo.Write(buf[:n]); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }
}

Here I used os.Open and os.Create which are convenient wrappers around os.OpenFile. We usually don't need to call OpenFile directly.

Notice treating EOF. Read tries to fill buf on each call, and returns io.EOF as error if it reaches end of file in doing so. In this case buf will still hold data. Consequent calls to Read returns zero as the number of bytes read and same io.EOF as error. Any other error will lead to a panic.

Using bufio

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "io"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    // open input file
    fi, err := os.Open("input.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    // close fi on exit and check for its returned error
    defer func() {
        if err := fi.Close(); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }()
    // make a read buffer
    r := bufio.NewReader(fi)

    // open output file
    fo, err := os.Create("output.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    // close fo on exit and check for its returned error
    defer func() {
        if err := fo.Close(); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }()
    // make a write buffer
    w := bufio.NewWriter(fo)

    // make a buffer to keep chunks that are read
    buf := make([]byte, 1024)
    for {
        // read a chunk
        n, err := r.Read(buf)
        if err != nil && err != io.EOF {
            panic(err)
        }
        if n == 0 {
            break
        }

        // write a chunk
        if _, err := w.Write(buf[:n]); err != nil {
            panic(err)
        }
    }

    if err = w.Flush(); err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
}

bufio is just acting as a buffer here, because we don't have much to do with data. In most other situations (specially with text files) bufio is very useful by giving us a nice API for reading and writing easily and flexibly, while it handles buffering behind the scenes.

Using ioutil

package main

import (
    "io/ioutil"
)

func main() {
    // read whole the file
    b, err := ioutil.ReadFile("input.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }

    // write whole the body
    err = ioutil.WriteFile("output.txt", b, 0644)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
}

Easy as pie! But use it only if you're sure you're not dealing with big files.

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18  
For anyone who stumbles upon this question, it was originally asked in 2009 before these libraries were introduced, so please, use this answer as your guide! –  Seth Hoenig May 17 '12 at 2:12
    
According to golang.org/pkg/os/#File.Write, when Write hasn't written all bytes, it returns an error. So the extra check in the first example (panic("error in writing")) isn't necessary. –  ayke Jan 5 '13 at 13:47
4  
Note that these examples aren't checking the error return from fo.Close(). From the Linux man pages close(2): Not checking the return value of close() is a common but nevertheless serious programming error. It is quite possible that errors on a previous write(2) operation are first reported at the final close(). Not checking the return value when closing the file may lead to silent loss of data. This can especially be observed with NFS and with disk quota. –  Nick Craig-Wood Jan 25 '13 at 7:12
    
@ayke Nice catch. I updated the answer (and some of my own code!) and removed the useless error check. –  Mostafa Mar 15 '13 at 19:09
1  
@NickCraig-Wood Thank your for your important tip. I added extra code to check for error on calling Close. I’m also starting to check for error on Close in my own programs. –  Mostafa Mar 15 '13 at 19:11

This is good version:

package main

import (
  "io/ioutil"; 
  )


func main() {
  contents,_ := ioutil.ReadFile("plikTekstowy.txt")
  println(string(contents))
  ioutil.WriteFile("filename", contents, 0x777)
}
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2  
I'll accept this answer if you get rid of the println. –  Seth Hoenig Jan 17 '11 at 20:30
    
This stores the whole file in memory. Since the file can be large, that may not be always what you want to do. –  user1047788 Mar 24 at 8:32
    
Also, 0x777 is bogus. In any case, it should be more like 0644 or 0755 (octal, not hex). –  cnst Apr 30 at 3:56

Using io.Copy

package main

import (
    "io"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main () {
    // open files r and w
    r, err := os.Open("input.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    defer r.Close()

    w, err := os.Create("output.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    defer w.Close()

    // do the actual work
    n, err := io.Copy(w, r)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    log.Printf("Copied %v bytes\n", n)
}

If you don't feel like reinventing the wheel, the io.Copy and io.CopyN may serve you well. If you check the source of the io.Copy function, it is nothing but one of the Mostafa's solutions (the 'basic' one, actually) packaged in the Go library. They are using a significantly larger buffer than he is, though.

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[]byte is a slice (similar to a substring) of all or part of a byte array. Think of the slice as a value structure with a hidden pointer field for the system to locate and access all or part of an array (the slice), plus fields for the length and capacity of the slice, which you can access using the len() and cap() functions.

Here's a working starter kit for you, which reads and prints a binary file; you will need to change the inName literal value to refer to a small file on your system.

package main
import (
    "fmt";
    "os";
)
func main()
{
    inName := "file-rw.bin";
    inPerm :=  0666;
    inFile, inErr := os.Open(inName, os.O_RDONLY, inPerm);
    if inErr == nil {
    	inBufLen := 16;
    	inBuf := make([]byte, inBufLen);
    	n, inErr := inFile.Read(inBuf);
    	for inErr == nil {
    		fmt.Println(n, inBuf[0:n]);
    		n, inErr = inFile.Read(inBuf);
    	}
    }
    inErr = inFile.Close();
}
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6  
The Go convention is to check for error first, and let the normal code reside outside the if block –  hasenj Dec 1 '09 at 1:16
1  
+1. if error { return } –  György Andrasek Dec 1 '09 at 9:44
    
@Jurily: If the file is open when the error occurs, how do you close it? –  peterSO Dec 1 '09 at 16:24
6  
@peterSO: use defer –  James Antill Dec 2 '09 at 5:25
    
But why is a [256]byte not accepted and the clearly silly and verbose (but apparently not wrong) inBuf:=make([]byte, 256) accepted? –  cardiff space man Jul 22 '12 at 4:03

Try this:

package main

import (
  "io"; 
  )


func main() {
  contents,_ := io.ReadFile("filename");
  println(string(contents));
  io.WriteFile("filename", contents, 0x644);
}
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This will work if you want to read the whole file at once. If the file's really big or you only want to read part of it, it might not be what you're looking for. –  Evan Shaw Nov 30 '09 at 21:04
2  
You should really check the error code, and not ignore it like that!! –  hasenj Dec 1 '09 at 2:48
2  
This has been moved into the ioutil package now. So it would be ioutil.ReadFile() –  Christopher Feb 24 '10 at 17:27

Just looking at the documentation it seems you should just declare a buffer of type []byte and pass it to read which will then read up to that many characters and return the number of characters actually read (and an error).

The docs say

Read reads up to len(b) bytes from the File. It returns the number of bytes read and an Error, if any. EOF is signaled by a zero count with err set to EOF.

Does that not work?

EDIT: Also, I think you should perhaps use the Reader/Writer interfaces declared in the bufio package instead of using os package.

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You have my vote because you actually acknowledge what real people see when they read the documentation, instead of parrotting what those accustomed to Go are REMINDED OF (not reading REMINDED OF) when they read the documentation of the function they are familiar with already. –  cardiff space man Jul 22 '12 at 4:00
    
And no what you said doesn't work. That's why I'm here. –  cardiff space man Jul 22 '12 at 4:01

The Read method takes a byte parameter because that is the buffer it will read into. It's a common Idiom in some circles and makes some sense when you think about it.

This way you can determine how many bytes will be read by the reader and inspect the return to see how many bytes actually were read and handle any errors appropriately.

As others have pointed in their answers bufio is probably what you want for reading from most files.

I'll add one other hint since it's really useful. Reading a line from a file is best accomplished not by the ReadLine method but the ReadBytes or ReadString method instead.

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