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I have a "date" table similar to:

id       date
----------------
1     2012-02-02
2     2013-02-02
3     2014-04-06

and a "date_range" table similar to:

   start           end
--------------------------
2011-01-01      2013-01-01
2014-01-01      2016-01-01

How can I get results from the "date" table where date does not fall between one of the "date_range" table entries?

The expected result is id->2, date->2013-02-02.

I've tried:

SELECT * FROM date
JOIN date_range
    ON date.date NOT BETWEEN date_range.start AND date_range.end

and the obvious fail:

SELECT * FROM date 
WHERE date.date NOT BETWEEN (SELECT start, end FROM date_range)
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As noted in comments elsewhere, you should avoid the use of BETWEEN, especially when dealing with dates (you don't mention RDBMS, some are 'safer' than others). This blog post (by @AaronBertrand) mentions some SQL Server-specific problems, but it actually applies to all ranges. Generally speaking, ranges should be specified lower-bound inclusive (>=), upper-bound exclusive ('<'), even for 'simple' situations. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '13 at 1:05
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use NOT EXISTS

SELECT * FROM [Date] D
WHERE NOT EXISTS
(
    SELECT 1 FROM Date_Range DR
    WHERE D.[Date] >= DR.[Start]
      AND D.[Date] <= DR.[End]
)

Demo

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SELECT * FROM date
LEFT JOIN date_range
    ON date.date >= date_range.start AND date.date <= date_range.end
WHERE date_range.start IS NULL
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Don't use BETWEEN. It is much safe to use >= START and <= END. ALSO NOT BETWEEN will not give the correct result in this case. –  Declan_K Aug 13 '13 at 21:40
    
@Declan_K Why not use BETWEEN? The only issue I've heard about is confusion over whether it's inclusive or exclusive. Is that it? –  Barmar Aug 13 '13 at 21:48
    
I have heard lots of argument abiut it. My intentiin wad to just show how close was the initial query. –  jyparask Aug 13 '13 at 21:50
    
I'm suprised why so many people suggest LEFT OUTER JOIN when they actually don't need a column from the second table. EXISTS or NOT EXISTS are more redable and more efficient in this case. Here's also a pitfall if date_range.start is nullable. sqlperformance.com/2012/12/t-sql-queries/left-anti-semi-join –  Tim Schmelter Aug 13 '13 at 21:54
    
Well in some cases you need uniformity. Again, my intention was to show how close was OP –  jyparask Aug 13 '13 at 21:58
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This will do it. You need a LEFT OUTER JOIN so that all records from the DATETABE are included.

SELECT  D.ID
        ,D.DATE
FROM    DATETABLE D
LEFT OUTER JOIN
        DATE_RANGE DR
ON      D.DATE >= DR.START
AND     D.DATE <= DR.END
WHERE   DR.START IS NULL
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