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Ever since I deployed a site running Django 1.7 alpha (checked out from Git), I've been occasionally receiving error messages with titles like:

"Invalid HTTP_HOST header: 'xxx.xxx.com'"

I realize that this is due to the Host: HTTP header being set to a hostname not listed in ALLOWED_HOSTS. However, I have no control over when and how often someone sends a request to the server with a forged hostname. Therefore I do not need a bunch of error emails letting me know that someone else is attempting to do something fishy.

Is there any way to disable this error message? The logging settings for the project look like this:

LOGGING = {
    'version': 1,
    'disable_existing_loggers': False,
    'filters': {
        'require_debug_false': {
            '()': 'django.utils.log.RequireDebugFalse'
        }
    },
    'handlers': {
        'mail_admins': {
            'level': 'ERROR',
            'filters': ['require_debug_false'],
            'class': 'django.utils.log.AdminEmailHandler'
        }
    },
    'loggers': {
        'django.request': {
            'handlers': ['mail_admins'],
            'level': 'ERROR',
            'propagate': True,
        },
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why are you using an alpha version in production? –  Burhan Khalid Sep 13 '13 at 16:52
1  
@Burhan: because a couple of important bugs were fixed after the latest stable release. –  Nathan Osman Sep 13 '13 at 16:57
1  
How are you hosting it (e.g. WSGI through Apache)? I'd be a big fan of trying to figure out how to block this before it hit Django –  Foon Sep 13 '13 at 17:00
    
@Foon: Apache via mod_wsgi. –  Nathan Osman Sep 13 '13 at 17:01
    
I agree with @Foon. You shouldn't be ignoring this error. You should be blocking requests with invalid headers before they reach Django. –  Mark Lavin Sep 13 '13 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+100

You shouldn't be ignoring this error. Instead you should be denying the request before it reaches your Django backend. To deny requests with no HOST set you can use

SetEnvIfNoCase Host .+ VALID_HOST
Order Deny,Allow
Deny from All
Allow from env=VALID_HOST

or force the match to a particular domain (example.com)

SetEnvIfNoCase Host example\.com VALID_HOST
Order Deny,Allow
Deny from All
Allow from env=VALID_HOST
share|improve this answer
8  
That is, you're using Apache only. Of you use nginx to forward requests, refer to this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/17477436/188614 –  Diego Ponciano Sep 20 '13 at 12:31
    
Mark -what do I need to enable to get this behavior you show above? also what config file would this go into if I'm using traditional apache 2.x ? –  Toran Billups Jan 18 at 20:36
    
You need mod_setenvif enabled. This would go either in httpd.conf or where your virtual host for the domain is defined. –  Mark Lavin Jan 18 at 23:45
    
The information about how to do this in the Apache configuration is useful to me. But I am missing information about why it is I must do this in the Apache configuration. Why can't django be trusted to deny the requests? –  kasperd Sep 7 at 8:22
    
@kasperd Django will deny the request but depending on your logging setting you may get an email each time. This is what the question wanted to avoid. Denying the request earlier (Apache/Nginx/etc) is still recommended docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.7/topics/security/… –  Mark Lavin Sep 7 at 13:04

You can add this to the loggers section of your logging configuration:

    'django.security.DisallowedHost': {
        'handlers': ['mail_admins'],
        'level': 'CRITICAL',
        'propagate': False,
    },

This sets the logging threshold to above the ERROR level that Django uses when a SuspiciousOperation is detected.

Alternatively, you can use e.g. a FileHandler to log these events without emailing them to you. For example, to use a dedicated file just for these specific events, you could add this to the handlers section:

    'spoof_logfile': {
        'level': 'ERROR',
        'class': 'logging.FileHandler',
        'filename': '/path/to/spoofed_requests.log',
    },

and then use this in the loggers section:

    'django.security.DisallowedHost': {
        'handlers': ['spoof_logfile'],
        'level': 'ERROR',
        'propagate': False,
    },

Note that the suggestion made in the Django docs, to use

    'django.security.DisallowedHost': {
        'handlers': ['null'],
        'propagate': False,
    },

depends on you running Python 2.7 or later - on 2.6, logging doesn't have a NullHandler.

share|improve this answer

you could silence that particular SuspiciousOperation with something like

'loggers': {
    'django.security.DisallowedHost': {
        'handlers': ['null'],
        'propagate': False,
   },

see this for more reference https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/logging/#django-security

EDIT

you also need to add a 'null' handler:

'handlers': {
    'null': {
        'level': 'DEBUG',
        'class': 'logging.NullHandler',
    },
}

probably you only need to add this and modify the level of error (replacing DEBUG with 'ERROR').

as always refer to the the documentation for the complete syntax and semantic.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to work. I get an error from mod_wsgi: "ValueError: Unable to configure logger 'django.security.DisallowedHost': Unable to add handler 'null': 'null'" –  Nathan Osman Aug 23 '13 at 6:21
    
do you have an handler named 'null' as the documentation says? I'll modify my answer to point to an example. –  DRC Aug 24 '13 at 15:46
    
It's still not working. Here is the exact logging configuration I am using: quickmediasolutions.com/pastebin/15/… –  Nathan Osman Sep 3 '13 at 5:04
    
For complete minimal example see stackoverflow.com/a/25114003/1714030 –  Daniel Backman Aug 4 at 7:59

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