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I'm using SQLite, and I have a table for properties, and a table for sub-properties. Each sub-property points to its parent using the fkPropertyId column. Right now, to create the initial database, I've got a script that looks something like this:

INSERT INTO property VALUES(1,.....);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(2,.....);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(3,.....);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(1,.....,3);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(2,.....,3);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(3,.....,3);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(4,.....);

Now, I want to get rid of the hard-coded rowId, so it would be something like:

INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(NULL,.....,X);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(NULL,.....,X);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(NULL,.....,X);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);

Where x refers to the last inserted rowId in the property table. Right now, that's

(SELECT MAX(rowId) FROM property)

Is there any better (and more technically accurate) way to write this script?

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2 Answers 2

Use the last_insert_rowid function:

SELECT last_insert_rowid();
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How do I keep that value for three consecutive inserts? –  Ed Marty Nov 30 '09 at 20:19
    
Just insert the property row first, then the subproperty. If you need to remember the property ID for more than one insert, assign it to a variable before doing the subproperty inserts. –  Benoit Nov 30 '09 at 20:22
1  
my problem is that this is a sqlite script and as far as I know, sqlite doesn't support user variables in scripts –  Ed Marty Nov 30 '09 at 20:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, the solution I came up with used the last_insert_rowid function from Ben S:

INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);

   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(1,.....,-1);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(2,.....,-1);
   INSERT INTO subproperty VALUES(3,.....,-1);
INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);
UPDATE subproperty SET fkPropertyId = (SELECT last_insert_rowid()) WHERE fkPropertyId=-1;

INSERT INTO property VALUES(NULL,.....);

Not sure if that's the best approach, but it works for me, and it doesn't use any extra tables for temporary data storage.

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