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Short of it: I'm experimenting with ExecutorService to run multiple threads and the computing time is much worse with multiple threads than with a single thread, so I'm trying to figure out where I went wrong. If details aren't important, skip the long of it below to get to the code.

Long of it: I setup a monte carlo method of calculating the area of a circle with radius of 1 to approximate the value of PI. I modeled it as simulating tossing darts at the circle with randomized x and y coordinates. Over a large number of tosses, the area of the circle can be approximated by how many darts hit it.

I created a DartTosser class implementing runnable to toss an increment of the total number of darts that need to be tossed. I created an object with an instance field and a synchronized method to aggregate the dart hits from multiple DartTossers. Once all darts have been tossed, pi is estimated and returned.

The number of threads and number of tosses are read in from user input. Then a button press triggers the following method:

private double estimatePi(int numThreads, long numTosses, TossBin bin){
    long tossIncrement = numTosses/numThreads;
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numThreads);

    for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; i++){
        executor.submit(new DartTosser(i, tossIncrement, bin));
    }

    executor.shutdown();

    System.out.println("All dart tossers have begun tossing darts.");

    try {
        executor.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    System.out.println("All darts have been tossed.");

    return (4*bin.getTotalInCircle())/((double)numTosses);
}

The DartTosser class triggers the following method in its run() method and then adds the total tosses that hit the circle to the instance of the TossBin object:

private long startTossing(){

    for (int i = 0; i < localTosses; i++){
        // get two random doubles between -1 and 1
        x = generateRandomNumber();
        y = generateRandomNumber();
        distanceSquared = (x*x) + (y*y);
        if (distanceSquared <= 1.0){
            tossesInCircle++;
        }
    }

    return tossesInCircle;
}

Just for completeness, this is what my TossBin class looks like:

public class TossBin {
    private long totalTossesInCircle = 0;

    public TossBin(){

    }

    public synchronized void addToTotalTosses(long n){
        this.totalTossesInCircle += n;
    }

    public void resetTossValues(){
        this.totalTossesInCircle = 0;
    }

    public long getTotalInCircle(){
        return totalTossesInCircle;
    }
}

The PI approximation is close, so I think my actual calculations are good. Running a single thread, it'll process 1 million tosses in around 1600 milliseconds or so. Running two threads, it'll process 1 million tosses in around 5600 milliseconds or so. The more threads, the more inefficient. I can see from system output that threads (appear to be) running concurrently, but my parallelization is obviously all kinds of jacked up.

I'm running this on a Galaxy S3 as well as an emulator from eclipse and I see the same general trend. Any thoughts?

And just to make sure I've aired all of my potentially dirty linens:

public class DartTosser implements Runnable {

private int id;
private long localTosses = 0;
private long tossesInCircle = 0;
double x, y, distanceSquared;
TossBin globalBin;

private double generateRandomNumber(){
    return (Math.random()*2.0)-1.0;

}

public DartTosser(int id, long tosses, TossBin globalBin){
    this.id = id;
    this.localTosses = tosses;
    this.globalBin = globalBin;
}

private long startTossing(){

    for (int i = 0; i < localTosses; i++){
        // get two random doubles between -1 and 1
        x = generateRandomNumber();
        y = generateRandomNumber();
        distanceSquared = (x*x) + (y*y);
        if (distanceSquared <= 1.0){
            tossesInCircle++;
        }
    }

    return tossesInCircle;
}

@Override
public void run() {
    System.out.println("Dart tosser number " + Integer.toString(id) + "starting work.");

    globalBin.addToTotalTosses(startTossing());

    System.out.println("Dart tosser number " + Integer.toString(id) + "finished work.");
}

}
share|improve this question
    
Just to make sure, you only call the addToTotalTosses method when one thread is done with all its tosses, right? –  Aert Aug 14 '13 at 2:32
    
Yep! I have to keep typing to post. –  Deranger Aug 14 '13 at 2:44
    
And you're not sharing your random generator between the threads? –  Aert Aug 14 '13 at 2:50
    
No, I don't think so, it should be an instance method within the DartTosser object. I can edit the code with my dart tosser class just in case that's helpful. –  Deranger Aug 14 '13 at 2:56
    
Just to be sure, I changed the globalBin.addToTotalTosses bit to two steps. long tossesToAdd = startTossing(); followed by the addToTotal call. Still is optimal to only run one thread. :/ –  Deranger Aug 14 '13 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, here's what I think is happening:

Math.random() uses a single instance of Random, calling nextDouble() which itself is thread-safe, using compare-and-swap.

As a result, the threads spend a lot of time waiting for eachother when generating Random numbers. Try by giving each instance of DartTosser its own Random instance and use Random.nextDouble() instead.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds reasonable. I will check this out as soon as I get a chance, and accept if it solves the problem. Thanks! –  Deranger Aug 14 '13 at 11:17
    
Dude, you got it. 2 million tosses, 1 thread, 2000ish milliseconds. 2 million tosses, 2 threads, 1000ish milliseconds. Roooock! –  Deranger Aug 14 '13 at 21:06
    
Sweeeeeeeeeeet! –  Aert Aug 15 '13 at 22:22

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