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I've found that when making masses of objects in JavaScript, the while loop is the best tool to tune performance.

I get the best speed when writing my loop like this:

var i = array.length
while (i--) {
  // Do stuff
}

However, if I want to nest a while loop, I have to use a different variable name, otherwise the counter breaks:

var i = array1.length
while (i--) {
  var i = array2.length
  while (i--) {
    // NOPE THE COUNTER IS NOW BROKEN
  }
}

Some have suggested j, but then why not start the first array with a variable called a and go up form there?

What's the best practice in this situation?

Is there a way to delete the variable so it isn't available in the secondary scope?

share|improve this question
    
Dont't see any problem, why is it hard to create two variables? –  Sergio Aug 14 '13 at 7:06
    
@Sergio: it can be annoying in automatically generated code –  6502 Aug 14 '13 at 7:21
    
@Jackson -- For auto-generated code I'd use semi-random variable names... usually something like $$_nameof_of_function_loopNumber –  Jeremy J Starcher Aug 14 '13 at 7:29
    
@JeremyJStarcher: you still may need nested scopes if the variable is captured by a closure in the do stuff part (and you'd like value capture and not variable capture). –  6502 Aug 14 '13 at 7:34
    
@6502 - True, but but the performance hit of an anonymous function in the middle of a loop is enough that I'd not recommend it until needed. Hmm.. even then I doubt I'd recommend it and suggest just putting things in a named function to invoke. –  Jeremy J Starcher Aug 14 '13 at 7:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The use of i and j (followed by k if you are nesting that deep) are standard idioms shared by many programming languages. (In fact, the use of i as a loop variable goes back to ForTran.)

By using i and j, anyone reading your code should realize those are standard loops and loop counters. Using a makes the reader stop and ponder over "Why was that used?"

Now, to answer your question:

In Javascript, you could reuse the variable i if you wanted to by using an anonymous function - but this is

  • Not standard practice
  • An anti-pattern -- AKA dumb
  • Slower to execute.

--

var i = 10;
while (i--) {
  (function() {
    // New function, this is a new `i`, completely masking the original.
    var i = 20;
    while(i--) {
    }
  {();
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, this is what I was looking for –  Jackson Gariety Aug 14 '13 at 7:10

You need variable scope here. In C, you can create variable scope with block:

int i = 1;
{
    int i = 2;
    printf("inner i = %d\n", i);
}
printf("outer i = %d\n", i);

//=>
inner i = 2
outer i = 1

However, in javascript, block doesn't create new variable scope, but shares the outer one. You'll need function to create a new variable scope.

var i = 2;
while (i--) {
    console.log("outer i = " + i);
    (function () {
        var i = 3;
        while (i--) {
            console.log("inner i = " + i);
        }
    })();
}

//=>
outer i = 1
inner i = 2
inner i = 1
inner i = 0
outer i = 0
inner i = 2
inner i = 1
inner i = 0
share|improve this answer
    
Cool answer! Very dirt, hahaha. Making a new function to keep a semantic variable name. JS is funny I like it. –  Jackson Gariety Aug 14 '13 at 7:20

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