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When I excuted this belo program, it is printing 5 inifnitely. Why? Is it because the decrement is not happening or before decrement happens function call is happening?

I have tried the alternate way making fun(--n), it gave me correct answer. But why it is not working for fun(n--)?

void fun(int n)
{
    if(!n)
    {
        cout << n << " " << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << n << " "<<endl;
        fun(n--);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int n = 5;
    fun(n);
system("pause");
return 0;
}
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2  
C and C++? This isn't C, just C++. –  user2638922 Aug 14 '13 at 7:44
2  
Because n-- returns 5. –  juanchopanza Aug 14 '13 at 7:45
    
Because you use the post decrement operator, it gives value 5 to fun and again and again... and after the function call n is decremented. Nice receipt for a stack overflow though. –  hetepeperfan Aug 14 '13 at 7:46
2  
I would call this infinite recursion by the way. –  hetepeperfan Aug 14 '13 at 7:51
1  
Although it has nothing to do with the problem, I'd also move the line cout << n << " " <<endl; before the if, as this makes the code simpler and doesn't change anything. –  Hulk Aug 14 '13 at 8:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Note that foo( n-- ) will return n and then decrement n by one (see this), hence returning 5, 5, 5, ... repeated. You need to do one of the following:

foo( --n ); // or,
foo( n - 1 );

... and thus your code should look like this:

void fun( int n ) {
  if( !n ) {
    cout << n << " " << endl;
  } else {
    cout << n << " "<< endl;

    n--;
    fun( n );
  }
}

int main( void ) {
  int n = 5;

  fun( n );
  system("pause");

  return 0;
}

Aside: It's good practice to not include any increment or decrement operations within another expression. Had you of done the following it would of been ok:

n--;
foo( n );

... it can lead to confusion as a client (and even as the programmer) if you begin incrementing and decrementing within expressions. Consider this as another example where doing so is a bad idea:

if ( ( condition_1 == true ) && ( i++ == val ) )

... if the first condition is false it will never reach the second condition and hence not increment i.

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Because n-- returns n before decrementing its value. Since you are calling your function that way, n always comes with the same value. You could write func(n--) that way :

int temp = n;
n = n - 1;
func(temp);
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It does not decrement n after the function has ended, but n-- returns the value n had before the increment was done. its like auto tmp = n; --n; fun(tmp); and not like fun(n); --n; –  Arne Mertz Aug 14 '13 at 7:46
1  
I see, this does make sense. I'll modify my answer accordingly. Thanks ! –  Nbr44 Aug 14 '13 at 7:48

you need to do foo(--n) and not foo(n--)

  • --n will decrement the value of n, and then send the decremented value
  • n-- will decrement the value of n, but send the pre-decremented value.

so when you do foo(n--) you decement the value of n, but send to the foo function the n bofore decrementing. as you can guess that will go forever

void fun(int n)
{
    if(!n)
    {
        cout << n << " " << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << n << " "<<endl;
        fun(--n);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int n = 5;
    fun(n);
system("pause");
return 0;
}

to learn more on the difference between n-- and --n read here

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It does not decrement n after the function has ended. its like auto tmp = n; --n; fun(tmp); and not like fun(n); --n; –  Arne Mertz Aug 14 '13 at 7:51

try :

void fun(int n)
{
    if(!n)
    {
        cout << n << " " << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << n << " "<<endl;
        fun(--n);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The OP already stated in his question that he knows that this works. He wanted to know why. –  Hulk Aug 14 '13 at 7:56

Your supplying the same value to fun() as was supplied in previous call.

share|improve this answer

Use fun(--n) instead of fun(n--)

The reason this happens this way is because n-- decrements after the function has been run returning 5 repeatedly while --n decrements before.

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the op allready stated that fun(--n) worked... –  hetepeperfan Aug 14 '13 at 7:48
    
@hetepeperfan Will annotate. –  user2638922 Aug 14 '13 at 7:48
    
Quite obvious as it really is stated in the question that it does work. However, this answer does not say why. –  user2672165 Aug 14 '13 at 7:48
    
@user2672165 Edited. –  user2638922 Aug 14 '13 at 7:50

Because fun(n--); means callfun with value n and then decrement n.

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