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I'd like to know if there is a 'safe' way to convert an object to an int avoiding exceptions.

I'm looking for something like public static bool TryToInt32(object value, out int result);

I know I could make something like this:

    public static bool TryToInt32(object value, out int result)
    {
        try
        {
            result = Convert.ToInt32(value);
            return true;
        }
        catch
        {
            result = 0;
            return false;
        }
    }

But i'd rather avoid exceptions, because they are slowing down the process.

I think this is more elegant, but it's still "cheap".

    public static bool TryToInt32(object value, out int result)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            result = 0;
            return false;
        }

        return int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result);
    }

Anyone has better idea's?

UPDATE:

This sounds a little like splitting hairs search. But converting an object to string forces the implementer to create a clear ToString() function.

for example:

    public class Percentage
    {
        public int Value { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("{0}%", Value);
        }
    }

        Percentage p = new Percentage();
        p.Value = 50;

        int v;

        if (int.TryParse(p.ToString(), out v))
        {

        }

This goes wrong, i can do two things here, Or implement the IConvertable like below.

    public static bool ToInt32(object value, out int result)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            result = 0;
            return false;
        }

        if (value is IConvertible)
        {
            result = ((IConvertible)value).ToInt32(Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture);
            return true;
        }

        return int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result);
    }

But the ToInt32 of the IConvertible cannot be canceled. So if it's not possible an exception cannot be avoided.

or two: Is there a way to check if the object contains a implicit operator?

This is very poor:

        if (value.GetType().GetMethods().FirstOrDefault(method => method.Name == "op_Implicit" && method.ReturnType == typeof(int)) != null)
        {
            result = (int)value;
            return true;
        }
share|improve this question
1  
Why are you wrapping the TryParse? –  Adriaan Stander Aug 14 '13 at 8:57
    
TryParse has a string a parameter. –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 8:58
    
I only want to use exception if i'm not expecting one. Here the parameter could be anything. So thats the POV i'm working from. –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 9:00
1  
Be aware that Convert.ToInt32 does something different. It tries to cast the object to IConvertible and then call the method ToInt32. There is a subtle difference: any class could implement IConvertible, but could have a ToString() that doesn't return a stringified number. –  xanatos Aug 14 '13 at 9:02
    
To your code I would add a check if value is already an int. if (value is int) return (int)value; –  xanatos Aug 14 '13 at 9:15

6 Answers 6

int variable = 0;
int.TryParse(stringValue, out variable);

If it can't be parsed, the variable will be 0. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f02979c7.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
This would fail, if you pass an object to TryParse. –  Kai Hartmann Aug 14 '13 at 11:20
1  
More reliable: int variable=int.TryParse(stringValue, out variable) ? variable : 0 –  Tim Schmelter Aug 20 '14 at 21:12

Spurring from the comments. The response is no. You can't do what Convert.ToInt32(object) does without having throwed exceptions. You can do something similar (and you already did it). The only thing I would optimize is the case of value already an int.

if (value is int) 
    return (int)value;

You can't do as Convert.ToInt32(object) because Convert.ToInt32(object) doesn't simply test if value is short, int, long, ushort, ... and then cast them. It checks if the value is IConvertible. If yes it uses the IConvertible.ToInt32. Sadly the interface IConvertible is quite poor: it doesn't have non-throwing methods (IConvertible.Try*)

While stupid (but perhaps not too much), someone could make for example a UnixDateTime struct: (UnixTime is the number of seconds from midnight 1970-01-01), where the IConvertible.ToInt32 returns this number of seconds, while the ToString() returns a formatted date. All the int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out parsed) would choke, while the Convert.ToInt32 would work flawlessly.

share|improve this answer
    
If we use an IConvertible as parameter in the method instead of object, wouldn't that solve the problem? For an example, see my answer. –  Kai Hartmann Aug 14 '13 at 9:36
    
@KaiHartmann Not if you already have an object. object obj = 5.5. MyConvert.ToInt32() would select the object overload instead of the IConvertible overload. –  xanatos Aug 14 '13 at 9:40
    
The IConvertible still could raise an exception.. –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 9:40

No need to re-invent the wheel here. use int.TryParse to achieve your goal. It returns a bool to show that value is parsed or not. and if parsed the result is saved in the output variable.

int result;
object a = 5;
if(int.TryParse(a.ToString(),out result))
{
   Console.WriteLine("value is parsed");  //will print 5
}    

object b = a5;
if(int.TryParse(b.ToString(),out result))
{
    Console.WriteLine("value is parsed");  
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("input is not a valid integer");  //will print this   
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would fail, if you pass an object to TryParse. –  Kai Hartmann Aug 14 '13 at 11:20
1  
@KaiHartmann yes it needs a string. And if you have object you will have to call the ToString method on that first. updated my answer. –  Ehsan Aug 14 '13 at 11:29

This might do the trick, since it only allows a convertable parameter, and it returns 0 if it is null:

public static void ToInt32(IConvertible value, out int result)
{
    result = Convert.ToInt32(value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the same like: result = value.ToInt32(Thread.....currentCulture); –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 9:43

I would use a mixture of what you are already doing;

  • Check if the object is null - return false and the value 0;
  • Attempt to convert directly - if successful, return true and the converted value
  • Attempt to parse value.ToString() - if successfull, return true and the parsed value
  • Any other case - Return false and the value 0, as object is not convertible/parsible

The resulting code:

public static bool TryToInt32(object value, out int result)
{
    result = 0;
    if (value == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    //Try to convert directly
    try
    {
        result = Convert.ToInt32(value);
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        //Could not convert, moving on
    }

    //Try to parse string-representation
    if (Int32.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result))
    {
        return true;
    }

    //If parsing also failed, object cannot be converted or paresed
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why should i pass it as reference? –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 9:25
    
@JeroenvanLangen, Because the result should keep its original value, if it is not converted - I've updated the answer. –  Lars Kristensen Aug 14 '13 at 9:26
    
@JeroenvanLangen, It seems I was mistaken. I will update the answer again. But still, this triple-check seems to be what you want. –  Lars Kristensen Aug 14 '13 at 9:39

Any of the tryParse internally uses a try catch block.

You may try regular expressions.

string s = "334";
Regex r = new Regex("^\\d*$");
int i=0;
if (r.IsMatch(s))
i = int.Parse(s);
share|improve this answer
1  
I would expect this to be much higher overhead than int.TryParse - also, I bet I can find some strings that make this throw... and I don't even mean the trivial 1222222222222222222222222313131234238458932475389475983475892348972398472398472‌​39847 - I mean more subtle things –  Marc Gravell Aug 14 '13 at 9:05
3  
Ah yes, here we go: "1٠2" or "٢" - BOOM! –  Marc Gravell Aug 14 '13 at 9:09
2  
@user2143314: no tryparse doesn't use any try/catch block, unless my ilspy is lying. –  Jeroen van Langen Aug 14 '13 at 9:11

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