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JSfiddle jsfiddle

I would like to use this concept of event delegation on each name spaced event. Appernetly it is more optimized than .big-ul li. I unfortunately cannot find the proper syntax to make it work while using namespaces or while trying to attach multiple event handlers simultaneously using a plain object?

$(".big-ul").on({
  "click.namespace", "li": function(event){
    $(this).toggleClass("active");
  },
  "mouseenter.namespace" , "li": function(event){
    $(this).addClass("inside");
  },
  "mouseleave.namespace", "li": function(event){
    $(this).removeClass("inside");
  }
});

example of event delegation from jquery's site

$("#dataTable tbody").on("click", "tr", function(event){
  alert($(this).text());
});
share|improve this question
    
+1 for even attempting it like that :) Do you have a JSFiddle for this? –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 14 '13 at 9:56
    
You have assigned the events to the selectors (i.e. "li") instead of the event type. That just looks wrong compared to the multi-event examples. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 14 '13 at 9:58
    
I know the li is wrong .. .wondering how to make it right lol –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 9:58
    
Added a JSFiddle with answer so you can play with options, but basically do not overcomplicate your code for the sake of a slight/negligible speed improvement. K.I.S.S. is the way to go. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 14 '13 at 10:10
    
I dont see the jsfiddles link... I totally understand the K.I.S.S mentality but learning these things make typically improve my structure and overall understanding of jquery/javascript (seeing that I'm still pretty novice) I just want to see the limitation. More of an excerise then a practical use. –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't attach multiple events to multiple functions like that. What you could do is using an each function on an object containing all the needed infos. You could even store your namespace-name (haha) in a separate variable:

Example on jsFiddle

var $root = $(".big-ul");
var namespace = 'namespace';
var events = [
    {
        event: "click"+"."+namespace, 
        delegate: "li",
        fn: function(event){
            $(this).toggleClass("active");
        }
    },
    {
        event: "mouseenter"+"."+namespace, 
        delegate: "li",
        fn: function(event){
            $(this).addClass("inside");
        }
    },
    {
        event: "mouseleave"+"."+namespace, 
        delegate: "li",
        fn: function(event){
            $(this).removeClass("inside");
        }
    }
]

for(i=0;i<events.length;i++){
    $root.on(events[i].event, events[i].delegate, events[i].fn);  
}

The advantage compared with the accepted solution:

  1. It's a far more flexible solution as you could send the events-Object across modules or dynamically bind events with one single function, when you always use the same event-Object structure.
  2. You can delegate from one root object to different child nodes, not only one.

Example:

/* events array*/
var events = [
    {
        root: "root-query-string",
        event: "eventname",
        delegate: "delegate-query-string",
        fn: function
    }
]

/* dynamic batch bind function */
function batchBind(events) {
    for(i=0; i<events.length; i++){
        $(el.root).on(events[i].event, events[i].delegate, events[i].fn);  
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer seems elegant and I wnat to mark it correct; however could you check and update the jsFiddles because it doesnt seem to be working for me –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:23
    
Also would does it differ from the top example, being that it's written code less written code lol? –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:30
    
Hi! I updated my answer with a working fiddle and an explanation why this solution is under some circumstances more useful. –  Nirazul Aug 14 '13 at 11:58
    
$.each is a lot slower than a standard for loop so I would just use one of those instead. jsfiddle –  milkshake Aug 14 '13 at 13:04
    
You're right, I updated my answer :) –  Nirazul Aug 14 '13 at 13:59

how about something like this?

$(".big-ul").on("click.namespace mouseenter.namespace mouseleave.namespace", "li", function(event){
    var eventMatch = event.handleObj.origType + "." + event.handleObj.namespace;

    if(eventMatch == "click.namespace"){
        $(this).toggleClass("active");
    }
    if(eventMatch == "mouseenter.namespace"){
        $(this).addClass("inside");
    }
    if(eventMatch == "mouseleave.namespace"){
        $(this).removeClass("inside");
    }
});

would that not work?

EDIT you could also replace the mutiple if statements with a switch statement if you preferred... it would probably give better performance too (if you are worried about that).

$(".big-ul").on("click.namespace mouseenter.namespace mouseleave.namespace", "li", function(event){

    var eventMatch = event.handleObj.origType + "." + event.handleObj.namespace;

    switch(eventMatch){
        case "click.namespace":
            $(this).toggleClass("active");
        break;
        case "mouseenter.namespace":
            $(this).addClass("inside");
        break;
        case "mouseleave.namespace":
            $(this).removeClass("inside");
        break;
    }
});

EDIT2 updated so jsfiddle will work based on what @Nirazul said. Example on jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
could you write that out? I'm super nerb –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:30
1  
@MatthewHarwood ok see answer :D –  milkshake Aug 14 '13 at 10:34
    
jsfiddle.net/hZGvx/2 accually isnt working. might you update this and edit... thanks for all your help –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:37
    
@MatthewHarwood I cant see where you specified your namespace in that jsfiddle? –  milkshake Aug 14 '13 at 10:41
    
@MatthewHarwood without the namespace this will work: jsfiddle.net/hZGvx/4 but other than that if the event namespaces exist in your code then it should work as per the code provided above, there was a issue with your css in the jsfiddle that caused issues though :D –  milkshake Aug 14 '13 at 10:47

The each answer given will not be more efficient than using the .big-ul li selector. My theory being that a basic on() selector runs against the selector once and connects the event immediately whereas the deferred on() with selector runs the selectors each time the events occur (to find the matching elements).

You might as well do it this way and keep it simple:

$(".big-ul li").on({
    "click.namespace": function (event) {
        $(this).toggleClass("active");
    },
        "mouseenter.namespace": function (event) {
        $(this).addClass("inside");
    },
        "mouseleave.namespace": function (event) {
        $(this).removeClass("inside");
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/AzQBR/1/

I am happy to be overruled about the speed of deferred on() compared to non-deferred on() calls if someone can run performance stats.

share|improve this answer
    
is this because of the loop? –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 10:09
    
Behind the scenes JQuery will iterate in similar manner to any of these methods (but may do a more optimal job than an external loop). If you don't want to go the the trouble of actually performance-testing each possible option, just keep it simple. If you have a massive list, you may want to performance test, or rework your interface. –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 14 '13 at 10:12
1  
I thought the whole point of event delegation was performance on runtime. Don't you think this would perform better in my example? I'm honestly not sure about this :) –  Nirazul Aug 14 '13 at 10:14
    
The above example maps individual events to the items directly using the basic version of on. The deferred mappings catch events at a higher level in the DOM and then run the selectors to find the correct element to run the events against. I honestly don't see how that could be faster, but I am happy to be corrected. Performance stats anyone? –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 14 '13 at 11:17
    
I tried out jsperf to do a test on both codes (sorry for the title, i tried out something else before and couldn't edit the title afterwards): jsperf.com/jquery-each-vs-for-loop-object –  Nirazul Aug 14 '13 at 13:55

Having looked over all the answers again (including my original one), I would recommend simply connecting each event separately using the deferred on() syntax:

var $bigul = $(".big-ul");
$bigul.on("click.namespace", "li", function (event) {
    $(this).toggleClass("active");
});
$bigul.on("mouseenter.namespace", "li", function (event) {
    $(this).addClass("inside");
});
$bigul.on("mouseleave.namespace", "li", function (event) {
    $(this).removeClass("inside");
});

All the other solutions over-complicate the code. This is about a straight forward as you can get.

JSFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/AzQBR/2/

share|improve this answer
    
This is a much more succinct approach, I agree. The other answers are overly complicated; however, this question was meant to be more of an exercise —more of a, "is it possible" not "is it practical". Nevertheless, You've actually swayed my opinion on how to tackle this when I ever need all of this. However, I will keep the answer above marked as correct because I believe that his answer fits the original question better. Thanks so much regardless +1 –  Matthew Harwood Aug 14 '13 at 18:16
    
When I find the person(s) responsible for down-voting valid answers (and I will eventually with my reputation scraper), they will answer for their crimes against SO! :) –  TrueBlueAussie Aug 15 '13 at 13:56

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