Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why can't I pass the table name to a prepared PDO statement?

$stmt = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * FROM :table WHERE 1');
if ($stmt->execute(array(':table' => 'users'))) {
    var_dump($stmt->fetchAll());
}

Is there another safe way to insert a table name into a SQL query? With safe I mean that I don't want to do

$sql = "SELECT * FROM $table WHERE 1"
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 70 down vote accepted

Please see the following: http://us3.php.net/manual/en/book.pdo.php#69304

Table and Column names cannot be replaced by parameters in PDO. In that case you will simply want to filter and sanitize the data manually. One way to do this is to pass in shorthand parameters to the function that will execute the query dynamically and then use a switch() statement to create a white list of valid values to be used for the table name or column name. That way no user input ever goes directly into the query. So for example:

function buildQuery( $get_var ) 
{
    switch($get_var)
    {
        case 1:
            $tbl = 'users';
            break;
    }

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM $tbl";
}

By leaving no default case or using a default case that returns an error message you ensure that only values that you want used get used.

share|improve this answer
9  
+1 for whitelisting options instead of using any kind of dynamic method. Another alternative might be mapping acceptable table names to an array with keys that correspond to the potential user input (e.g. array('u'=>'users', 't'=>'table', 'n'=>'nonsensitive_data') etc.) –  Kzqai Dec 22 '11 at 18:05

To understand why binding a table (or column) name doesn't work, you have to understand how the placeholders in prepared statements work: they are not simply substituted in as (suitably escaped) strings, and the resulting SQL executed. Instead, a DBMS asked to "prepare" a statement comes up with a complete query plan for how it would execute that query, including which tables and indexes it would use, which will be the same regardless of how you fill in the placeholders.

The plan for SELECT name FROM my_table WHERE id = :value will be the same whatever you substitute for :value, but the seemingly similar SELECT name FROM :table WHERE id = :value cannot be planned, because the DBMS has no idea what table you're actually going to select from.

This is not something an abstraction library like PDO can or should work around, either, since it would defeat the 2 key purposes of prepared statements: 1) to allow the database to decide in advance how a query will be run, and use the same plan multiple times; and 2) to prevent security issues by separating the logic of the query from the variable input.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the insight. –  Songo Nov 10 '13 at 18:13
    
True, but does not account for PDO's prepare statement emulation (which could conceivably parameterise SQL object identifiers, albeit I still agree that it probably shouldn't). –  eggyal Dec 27 '13 at 19:40
    
@eggyal I guess the emulation is aimed at making standard functionality work on all DBMS flavours, rather than adding completely new functionality. A placeholder for identifiers would also need a distinct syntax not directly supported by any DBMS. PDO is quite a low-level wrapper, and doesn't for instance offer and SQL generation for TOP/LIMIT/OFFSET clauses, so this would be a bit out of place as a feature. –  IMSoP Jan 1 at 19:53

I see this is an old post, but I found it useful and thought I'd share a solution similar to what @kzqai suggested:

I have a function that receives two parameters like...

function getTableInfo($inTableName, $inColumnName) {
    ....
}

Inside I check against arrays I've set up to make sure only tables and columns with "blessed" tables are accessible:

$allowed_tables_array = array('tblTheTable');
$allowed_columns_array['tblTheTable'] = array('the_col_to_check');

Then the PHP check before running PDO looks like...

if(in_array($inTableName, $allowed_tables_array) && in_array($inColumnName,$allowed_columns_array[$inTableName]))
{
    $sql = "SELECT $inColumnName AS columnInfo
            FROM $inTableName";
    $stmt = $pdo->prepare($sql); 
    $stmt->execute();
    $result = $stmt->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
}
share|improve this answer

Using the former isn't inherently more safe than the latter, you need to sanitize the input whether it's part of a parameter array or a simple variable. So I don't see anything wrong with using the latter form with $table, provided you make sure that the content of $table is safe (alphanum plus underscores?) before using it.

share|improve this answer
    
Considering that the first option won't work, you have to use some form of dynamic query building. –  Noah Goodrich Oct 8 '08 at 11:58
    
Yes, the question mentioned it won't work. I was trying to describe why it wasn't terribly important to even try to do it that way. –  Adam Bellaire Oct 8 '08 at 12:01

Part of me wonders if you could provide your own custom sanitizing function as simple as this:

$value = preg_replace('/[^a-zA-Z_]*/', '', $value);

I haven't really thought through it, but it seems like removing anything except characters and underscores might work.

share|improve this answer
    
MySQL table names can contain other characters. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/identifiers.html –  Phil Apr 29 at 1:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.