Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to use TypeScript with jsTree. How can I call the setCurrentNode function in the bound jsTree function?

class MyController {
    thescope: any;
    static $inject = ['$scope'];

    constructor($scope) {
        $scope.vm = this;
        this.thescope = $scope;

        (<any>$("#demo2")).jstree({
             .bind("select_node.jstree", function (e, data) {
              // how can I call setCurrentNode(data) here?
             }
        });

    }


    setCurrentNode(node: any): any {
        ... // do Stuff in this typescript function
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
.bind("select_node.jstree", function (e, data) { this.setCurrentNode(data); });? A function does not capture this, but an arrow function will capture this. –  Stephen Chung Aug 15 '13 at 4:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Solution:

(<any>$("#demo2")).jstree({
         .bind("select_node.jstree", this.setCurrentNode.bind(this) )
         }

public setCurrentNode(e:any,data: any): any {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not completely sure, so please correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't the use of the lamba expression solve this problem as well?

As follows:

class MyController {
    thescope: any;
    static $inject = ['$scope'];

    constructor($scope) {
        $scope.vm = this;
        this.thescope = $scope;

        (<any>$("#demo2")).jstree({
             .bind("select_node.jstree", (e, data) => {
                 this.setCurrentNode(e, data);
             }
        });

    }

    setCurrentNode(e: any, node: any): any {
        ... // do Stuff in this typescript function
    }
}

The lambda (=>) expression will make sure the function is executed in the same scope as the scope you're defining it in. If you'd look at the compiled JavaScript code you'll see he will keep a reference to the constructor scope and will call setCurrentNode on that scope. Simplified example:

var _this = this;
$("#demo2").jstree({
     .bind("select_node.jstree", (e, data) => {
         _this.setCurrentNode(e, data);
     });

I believe this would solve your problem?

On a side note, you should look for a jsTree definition file or at least add a stub declaration yourself so you don't need to cast JQuery to any. Just my 2cts, it looks ugly to me.

share|improve this answer

As per Anzeo's suggestion to prevent the need for casting $ to any the following is all you need to get you started :

interface JQuery{
        jstree:Function;
}
share|improve this answer

What it happens is that the inner jsTree callback is overwriting the this initial reference to the instance object.

There are two safe ways to solve this:

1- By the use of the arrow function as pointed by @Anzeo, which I don't recommend and I never use since if you need to have another nested callback then you can have a this reference to the innermost event object.

2- By caching the this reference to the instance object like:

class MyController {
    thescope: any;
    static $inject = ['$scope'];

    constructor($scope) {
        // Caching the reference for using it in the inner callbacks.
        var self = this;

        $scope.vm = this;
        this.thescope = $scope;

        (<any>$("#demo2")).jstree({
             .bind("select_node.jstree", function (e, data) {

              // Call to the instance method here!
              self.setCurrentNode(/*Node params here*/);
             }
        });

    }


    setCurrentNode(node: any): any {
        ... // do Stuff in this typescript function
    }
}

I recommend you to stick with 2 since it will work though any nesting level and you can have the this in each nested callback pointing to the right event object.

See Javascript 'this' overwriting in Z combinator and every other recursive function for more references since the problem is the same as here.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand your objections towards the lambda (arrow) function? Either you keep on using the lambda function to get the reference to your original scope in each nested function, or you don't to keep the scope of the nested function? Because your second approach is unnecessary as the lambda expression will do this for you (if you would look at the compiled JavaScript output). –  Anzeo Aug 20 '13 at 9:00
    
Yes, it will do that for you, but will overwrite this reference at every nesting level, which makes referencing the current object (not Class instance!) in an inner callback impossible (if you find a way to do it without this caching please tell me!). See this excellent discussion for more reference. If you want we can move this discussion to a chat so we can discuss it further, maybe you can point me toward its correct use but my opinion is that TypeScript has to code a reserved word like self always pointing to the Class instance. –  diosney Aug 20 '13 at 15:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.