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I run Hive via AWS EMR and have a jobflow that parses log data frequently into S3. I use dynamic partitions (date and log level) for my parsed Hive table.

One thing that is taking forever now when I have several gigabytes of data and a lot of partitions is when Hive is loading data to the table after the parsing is done.

Loading data to table default.logs partition (dt=null, level=null)
    ...
    Loading partition {dt=2013-08-06, level=INFO}
    Loading partition {dt=2013-03-12, level=ERROR}
    Loading partition {dt=2013-08-03, level=WARN}
    Loading partition {dt=2013-07-08, level=INFO}
    Loading partition {dt=2013-08-03, level=ERROR}
    ...

    Partition default.logs{dt=2013-03-05, level=INFO} stats: [num_files: 1, num_rows: 0, total_size: 1905, raw_data_size: 0]
    Partition default.logs{dt=2013-03-06, level=ERROR} stats: [num_files: 1, num_rows: 0, total_size: 4338, raw_data_size: 0]
    Partition default.logs{dt=2013-03-06, level=INFO} stats: [num_files: 1, num_rows: 0, total_size: 828250, raw_data_size: 0]
    ...
    Partition default.logs{dt=2013-08-14, level=INFO} stats: [num_files: 5, num_rows: 0, total_size: 626629, raw_data_size: 0]
    Partition default.logs{dt=2013-08-14, level=WARN} stats: [num_files: 4, num_rows: 0, total_size: 4405, raw_data_size: 0]

Is there a way to overcome this problem and reduce the loading times for this step?

I have already tried to archive old logs to Glacier via a bucket lifecycle rule in hopes that Hive would skip loading the archived partitions. Well, since this still keeps the file(path)s visible in S3 Hive recognizes the archived partitions anyway so no performance is gained.

Update 1

The loading of the data is done by simple inserting the data into the dynamically partitioned table

INSERT INTO TABLE logs PARTITION (dt, level)
SELECT time, thread, logger, identity, message, logtype, logsubtype, node, storageallocationstatus, nodelist, userid, nodeid, path, datablockid, hash, size, value, exception, server, app, version, dt, level
FROM new_logs ;

from one table that contain the unparsed logs

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE new_logs (
  dt STRING,
  time STRING,
  thread STRING,
  level STRING,
  logger STRING,
  identity STRING,
  message STRING,
  logtype STRING,
  logsubtype STRING,
  node STRING,
  storageallocationstatus STRING,
  nodelist STRING,
  userid STRING,
  nodeid STRING,
  path STRING,
  datablockid STRING,
  hash STRING,
  size STRING,
  value STRING,
  exception STRING,
  version STRING
)
PARTITIONED BY (
  server STRING,
  app STRING
)
ROW FORMAT
  DELIMITED
  FIELDS TERMINATED BY '\t'
STORED AS
  INPUTFORMAT 'org.maz.hadoop.mapred.LogFileInputFormat'
  OUTPUTFORMAT 'org.apache.hadoop.hive.ql.io.IgnoreKeyTextOutputFormat'
LOCATION 's3://my-log/logs/${LOCATION}' ;

into the new (parsed) table

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE logs (
  time STRING,
  thread STRING,
  logger STRING,
  identity STRING,
  message STRING,
  logtype STRING,
  logsubtype STRING,
  node STRING,
  storageallocationstatus STRING,
  nodelist STRING,
  userid STRING,
  nodeid STRING,
  path STRING,
  datablockid STRING,
  hash STRING,
  size STRING,
  exception STRING,
  value STRING,
  server STRING,
  app STRING,
  version STRING
)
PARTITIONED BY (
  dt STRING,
  level STRING
)
ROW FORMAT
  DELIMITED
  FIELDS TERMINATED BY '\t'
  LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
STORED AS TEXTFILE
LOCATION 's3://my-log/parsed-logs' ;

The input format (LogFileInputFormat) is responsible of parsing log entries to the desired log format.

Update 2

When I try the following

INSERT INTO TABLE logs PARTITION (dt, level)
SELECT time, thread, logger, identity, message, logtype, logsubtype, node, storageallocationstatus, nodelist, userid, nodeid, path, datablockid, hash, size, value, exception, server, app, version, dt, level
FROM new_logs
WHERE dt > 'some old date';

Hive still loads all partitions in logs. If I on the other hand use static partitioning like

INSERT INTO TABLE logs PARTITION (dt='some date', level)
SELECT time, thread, logger, identity, message, logtype, logsubtype, node, storageallocationstatus, nodelist, userid, nodeid, path, datablockid, hash, size, value, exception, server, app, version, level
FROM new_logs
WHERE dt = 'some date';

Hive only loads the concerned partitions, but then I need to create one query for each date I think might be present in new_logs. Usually new_logs only contain log entries from today and yesterday it but might contain older entries as well.

Static partitioning are my solution of choice at the moment but aren't there any other (better) solutions to my problem?

share|improve this question
    
how many partitions in total are affected in the insert process? From the logs it seems that there are partition with really small amount of data (total_size) - maybe its possible to use bigger (say monthly) partitions? How exactly are you loading the data? –  dimamah Aug 14 '13 at 16:44
    
@dimamah Usually only the current date is affected by the insert process because when a log file is uploaded to S3 I parse it immediately. Can it be that since I use dynamic partitions Hive can't possibly know which partitions that's going to be affected in the insert process and therefore loading every partitions available? See the updated section. –  Mattias Z Aug 15 '13 at 7:59
    
hive will update only the affected partitions and its really strange it takes a long time only when you use dynamic partitions. what's exactly taking long time? how long do the mappers run? how long do the reducers run? if there are stages, please state it for every stage. is there a specific mappers / reducer running for long time? please paste its log. –  dimamah Sep 23 '13 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

During this slow phase, Hive takes the files it built for each partition and moves it from a temporary directory to a permanent directory. You can see this in the "explain extended" called a Move Operator.

So for each partition it's one move and an update to the metastore. I don't use EMR but I presume this act of moving files to S3 has high latency for each file it needs to move.

What's not clear from what you wrote is whether you're doing a full load each time you run. For example why do you have a 2013-03-05 partition? Are you getting new log data that contains this old date? If this data is already in your logs table you should modify your insert statement like

SELECT fields
FROM new_logs
WHERE dt > 'date of last run';

This way you'll only get a few buckets and only a few files to move. It's still wasteful to scan all this extra data from new_logs but you can solve that by partitioning new_logs.

share|improve this answer
    
Great stuff, will try it out. The logs that are inserted into logs has nearly always the same date as the current date (maybe yesterday if the parsing is done a few hours after midnight) since the log entries in new_logs will only contain log entries uploaded to our server in the last hour or so. The really old dates are to allow querying against all our parsed logs. –  Mattias Z Aug 19 '13 at 13:16
    
Trying to limit by date didn't solve my problem. The only solution I found working was to use static partitioning. But this is not entirely desirable since I then have to create one query per date. I would be much more nice to only have one query. Any suggestions? –  Mattias Z Sep 10 '13 at 12:54

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