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I have a small problem with my Python 2 program.

Here is my function:

def union(q,p):
      q = q + p
      q = set(q)
      return q, p

Then I have created new two lists and called my function:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [2,4,6]
union(a,b)

Finally I'm printing out a and b:

>>>print a
[1,2,3]
>>>print b
[2,4,6]

As you can see my function didn't change the value of a. Why? How can I fix that? What am I doing wrong?

NOTE: a used to be [1,2,3,4,6] instead of [1,2,3]

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assign return values back to a and b:

>>> def union(q,p):
...       q = q + p
...       q = set(q)
...       return q, p
... 
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> b = [2,4,6]
>>> a, b = union(a, b)
>>> a
set([1, 2, 3, 4, 6])
>>> b
[2, 4, 6]

To get a list from set, use list as Haidro commented:

>>> list(a)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 6]
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One more question, how can I make a list from set? –  Michael Vayvala Aug 14 '13 at 11:25
2  
@MichaelVayvala Just call list back on it: list(a) –  Haidro Aug 14 '13 at 11:26

Your function doesn't change it in place, it returns the new items. Thus, you have to return the result to a variable:

a, b = union(a, b)
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Your function never mutates the object in a. Either mutate it, or assign the value returned from the function back to it.

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While the principle is the same, here's another way of achieving it.

>>> def union(a,b):
...     a = set(a) | set(b)
...     return a,b
... 
>>> a = [1,2,4]
>>> b = [5,7,8]
>>> a,b = union(a,b)
>>> a
set([1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8])
>>> b
[5, 7, 8]
>>> list(a)
[1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8]
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Line 2: TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for BitOr: 'set' and 'set' –  Michael Vayvala Aug 14 '13 at 11:38
    
Strange I can't replicate that error –  blue_zinc Aug 14 '13 at 11:47

As said by other answers, you have to assign what is returned by union. This is because inside union you don't modify q, you create a new local variable (which happens to be called q also).

If you want to modify what is passed as reference you have to:

def union_mod(q, p):
  q.extend(p)
  return set(q), p

Now, what you pass as q is modified (it will continue to be a list, can't change type). So:

In [1]: a = [1,2,3]

In [2]: b = [2,4,6]

In [3]: def union_mod(q, p):
   ...:     q.extend(p)
   ...:     return set(q), p
   ...: 

In [4]: union_mod(a,b)
Out[4]: (set([1, 2, 3, 4, 6]), [2, 4, 6])

In [5]: a
Out[5]: [1, 2, 3, 2, 4, 6]

In [6]: b
Out[6]: [2, 4, 6]
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