Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to print an integer in Python 2.6.1 with commas as thousands separators. For example, I want to show the number 1234567 as "1,234,567". How would I go about doing this? I have seen many examples on Google, but I am looking for the simplest practical way.

It does not need to be locale-specific to decide between periods and commas. I would prefer something as simple as reasonably possible.

share|improve this question

15 Answers 15

up vote 116 down vote accepted

I got this to work:

>>> import locale
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, 'en_US')
'en_US'
>>> locale.format("%d", 1255000, grouping=True)
'1,255,000'

Sure, you don't need internationalization support, but it's clear, concise, and uses a built-in library.

P.S. That "%d" is the usual %-style formatter. You can have only one formatter, but it can be whatever you need in terms of field width and precision settings.

P.P.S. If you can't get locale to work, I'd suggest a modified version of Mark's answer:

def intWithCommas(x):
    if type(x) not in [type(0), type(0L)]:
        raise TypeError("Parameter must be an integer.")
    if x < 0:
        return '-' + intWithCommas(-x)
    result = ''
    while x >= 1000:
        x, r = divmod(x, 1000)
        result = ",%03d%s" % (r, result)
    return "%d%s" % (x, result)

Recursion is useful for the negative case, but one recursion per comma seems a bit excessive to me.

share|improve this answer
7  
I tried your code, and unfortunately, I get this: "locale.Error: unsupported locale setting". :-s –  Mark Byers Nov 30 '09 at 23:25
6  
Mark: If you're on Linux, you might want to look at what is in your /etc/locale.gen, or whatever your glibc is using to build its locales. You might also want to try ""en", "en_US.utf8", "en_US.UTF-8", 'en_UK" (sp?), etc. mikez: There needs to be a book: "Dr. PEP: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love docs.python.org." I gave up memorizing all the libraries back around Python 1.5.6. As for locale, I use as little of it as I can. –  Mike DeSimone Nov 30 '09 at 23:32
6  
You can use '' for setlocale to use the default, which hopefully will be appropriate. –  Mark Ransom Nov 30 '09 at 23:49
12  
Try this: locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '') It worked for me –  Nadia Alramli Dec 1 '09 at 0:00
1  
Although clever, I don't like functions that make global settings... Using 'blah'.format() is the better way to go. –  Cerin May 20 '12 at 18:14

I too, prefer the "simplest practical way". For >= 2.7:

"{:,}".format(value)

http://docs.python.org/library/string.html#format-specification-mini-language

share|improve this answer
13  
why isn't this the answer? It's by far the simplest –  Sevenearths Jun 20 '12 at 13:28
10  
This is only supported in 2.7 and later. The documentation you link to states "Changed in version 2.7: Added the ',' option" -- the question is specifically referring to Python 2.6. –  Daniel Fortunov Jul 19 '12 at 13:27
11  
@Sevenearths: Did you look at the dates? This question was asked in 2009. Python 2.7 was released in 2010. This answer was given in 2012. It's great that user1415726 added a good answer three years later, but it's hardly surprising that the OP wasn't willing to wait until 2012 to get an answer. Also Nadia already wrote this as part of her answer. –  Mark Byers Dec 17 '12 at 8:35
1  
Thank you ! I wish I could give +2 more votes for this answer . –  alinsoar Oct 26 '13 at 18:29
3  
Note to self: in future, wait four years before answering, to allow time for the language to fix the problem so I can get more upvotes with a cleaner answer. ^_- –  Mike DeSimone Jan 29 at 20:01

Here is the locale grouping code after removing irrelevant parts and cleaning it up a little:

(The following only works for integers)

def group(number):
    s = '%d' % number
    groups = []
    while s and s[-1].isdigit():
        groups.append(s[-3:])
        s = s[:-3]
    return s + ','.join(reversed(groups))

>>> group(-23432432434.34)
'-23,432,432,434'

There are already some good answers in here. I just want to add this for future reference. In python 2.7 there is going to be a format specifier for thousands separator. According to python docs it works like this

>>> '{:20,.2f}'.format(f)
'18,446,744,073,709,551,616.00'

In python3.1 you can do the same thing like this:

>>> format(1234567, ',d')
'1,234,567'
share|improve this answer
2  
Wow, thanks for the info. It's nice to know that this will be easier in future. –  Mark Byers Dec 1 '09 at 0:32
2  
The format(...) syntax works for me in Python2.7.3... –  Cerin May 20 '12 at 18:15
    
Yeah, the harder ways are mainly for folks on older Pythons, such as those shipped with RHEL and other long-term support distros. –  Mike DeSimone May 20 '12 at 22:21
    
how to express this with format strings ? "%,d" % 1234567 does not work –  Frederic Bazin May 6 '13 at 8:31

For inefficiency and unreadability it's hard to beat:

>>> import itertools
>>> s = '-1234567'
>>> ','.join(["%s%s%s" % (x[0], x[1] or '', x[2] or '') for x in itertools.izip_longest(s[::-1][::3], s[::-1][1::3], s[::-1][2::3])])[::-1].replace('-,','-')
share|improve this answer
35  
Voted up for most inefficient and unreadable method to answer this question. –  psytek Jan 19 '12 at 19:39
4  
Agreed, this should be in a textbook. –  Gavin C Jan 19 '12 at 19:41
5  
remarkably hard to understand, brilliant! –  Sam Dozor Jan 19 '12 at 19:41
1  
Periods? That ain't even possible, holms. This piece of junk totally ignores locale. I wonder how you got that result. Your example produces '17,371,830' for me, as expected. –  Kasey Kirkham Feb 25 '12 at 1:42
2  
To make this a function I would suggest: lambda x: (lambda s: ','.join(["%s%s%s" % (x[0], x[1] or '', x[2] or '') for x in itertools.izip_longest(s[::-1][::3], s[::-1][1::3], s[::-1][2::3])])[::-1].replace('-,','-'))(str(x)) just to keep the obfuscation theme. –  xiaomao Nov 23 '12 at 3:24

Here's a one-line regex replacement:

re.sub("(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))", r"\1,", "%d" % val)

Works only for inegral outputs:

import re
val = 1234567890
re.sub("(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))", r"\1,", "%d" % val)
# Returns: '1,234,567,890'

val = 1234567890.1234567890
# Returns: '1,234,567,890'

Or for floats with less than 4 digits, change the format specifier to %.3f:

re.sub("(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))", r"\1,", "%.3f" % val)
# Returns: '1,234,567,890.123'

NB: Doesn't work correctly with more than three decimal digits as it will attempt to group the decimal part:

re.sub("(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))", r"\1,", "%.5f" % val)
# Returns: '1,234,567,890.12,346'

How it works

Let's break it down:

re.sub(pattern, repl, string)

pattern = \
    "(\d)           # Find one digit...
     (?=            # that is followed by...
         (\d{3})+   # one or more groups of three digits...
         (?!\d)     # which are not followed by any more digits.
     )",

repl = \
    r"\1,",         # Replace that one digit by itself, followed by a comma,
                    # and continue looking for more matches later in the string.
                    # (re.sub() replaces all matches it finds in the input)

string = \
    "%d" % val      # Format the string as a decimal to begin with
share|improve this answer
2  
upvote for nice little regex lesson –  leontx Feb 18 at 23:07
    
answers like this are what makes the internet great –  bernie Jun 27 at 16:46

I'm sure there must be a standard library function for this, but it was fun to try to write it myself using recursion so here's what I came up with:

def intToStringWithCommas(x):
    if type(x) is not int and type(x) is not long:
        raise TypeError("Not an integer!")
    if x < 0:
        return '-' + intToStringWithCommas(-x)
    elif x < 1000:
        return str(x)
    else:
        return intToStringWithCommas(x / 1000) + ',' + '%03d' % (x % 1000)

Having said that, if someone else does find a standard way to do it, you should use that instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately doesn't work in all cases. intToStringWithCommas(1000.1) -> '1.0001,000' –  Nadia Alramli Nov 30 '09 at 23:53
    
He specifically said integers and that it should be as simple as possible, so I decided not to handle datatypes other than integers. I also made it explicit in the function name _int_ToStringWithCommas. Now I've also added a raise to make it more clear. –  Mark Byers Dec 1 '09 at 0:20
    
You are right, discard my comment –  Nadia Alramli Dec 1 '09 at 0:44

From the comments to activestate recipe 498181 I reworked this:

import re
def thous(x, sep=',', dot='.'):
    num, _, frac = str(x).partition(dot)
    num = re.sub(r'(\d{3})(?=\d)', r'\1'+sep, num[::-1])[::-1]
    if frac:
        num += dot + frac
    return num

It uses the regular expressions feature: lookahead i.e. (?=\d) to make sure only groups of three digits that have a digit 'after' them get a comma. I say 'after' because the string is reverse at this point.

[::-1] just reverses a string.

share|improve this answer
    
mate! you my saver! thank you, finally this is freaking solved. –  holms Feb 17 '12 at 18:26

Here's one that works for floats too:

def float2comma(f):
    s = str(abs(f)) # Convert to a string
    decimalposition = s.find(".") # Look for decimal point
    if decimalposition == -1:
        decimalposition = len(s) # If no decimal, then just work from the end
    out = "" 
    for i in range(decimalposition+1, len(s)): # do the decimal
        if not (i-decimalposition-1) % 3 and i-decimalposition-1: out = out+","
        out = out+s[i]      
    if len(out):
        out = "."+out # add the decimal point if necessary
    for i in range(decimalposition-1,-1,-1): # working backwards from decimal point
        if not (decimalposition-i-1) % 3 and decimalposition-i-1: out = ","+out
        out = s[i]+out      
    if f < 0:
        out = "-"+out
    return out

Usage Example:

>>> float2comma(10000.1111)
'10,000.111,1'
>>> float2comma(656565.122)
'656,565.122'
>>> float2comma(-656565.122)
'-656,565.122'
share|improve this answer
    
float2comma(12031023.1323) returns: '12,031,023.132,3' –  Arnar Yngvason Jul 5 '11 at 21:53

Just subclass long (or float, or whatever). This is highly practical, because this way you can still use your numbers in math ops (and therefore existing code), but they will all print nicely in your terminal.

>>> class number(long):

        def __init__(self, value):
            self = value

        def __repr__(self):
            s = str(self)
            l = [x for x in s if x in '1234567890']
            for x in reversed(range(len(s)-1)[::3]):
                l.insert(-x, ',')
            l = ''.join(l[1:])
            return ('-'+l if self < 0 else l) 

>>> number(-100000)
-100,000
>>> number(-100)
-100
>>> number(-12345)
-12,345
>>> number(928374)
928,374
>>> 345
share|improve this answer
1  
>>> number(-100) -> "-,100" –  Mark Byers Nov 30 '09 at 23:29
    
Fixed it. See new examples –  twneale Dec 1 '09 at 0:09
8  
I like the subclass idea, but is __repr__() the correct method to override? I would suggest overriding __str__() and leaving __repr__() alone, because int(repr(number(928374))) ought to work, but int() will choke on the commas. –  steveha Dec 1 '09 at 1:02
    
@steveha has a good point, but the justification should have been that number(repr(number(928374))) doesn't work, not int(repr(number(928374))). All the same, to make this approach work directly with print, as the OP requested, the __str__() method should be the one overridden rather than __repr__(). Regardless, there appears to be a bug in the core comma insertion logic. –  martineau Oct 18 '10 at 12:29

I'm using python 2.5 so I don't have access to the built-in formatting.

I looked at the django code intcomma (intcomma_recurs in code below) and realized it's inefficient, because it's recursive and also compiling the regex on every run is not a good thing either. This is not necessary an 'issue' as django isn't really THAT focused on this kind of low-level performance. Also, I was expecting a factor of 10 difference in performance, but it's only 3 times slower.

Out of curiosity I implemented a few versions of intcomma to see what the performance advantages are when using regex. My test data concludes a slight advantage for this task, but surprisingly not much at all.

I also was pleased to see what I suspected: using the reverse xrange approach is unnecessary in the no-regex case, but it does make the code look slightly better at the cost of ~10% performance.

Also, I assume what you're passing in is a string and looks somewhat like a number. Results undetermined otherwise.

from __future__ import with_statement
from contextlib import contextmanager
import re,time

re_first_num = re.compile(r"\d")
def intcomma_noregex(value):
    end_offset, start_digit, period = len(value),re_first_num.search(value).start(),value.rfind('.')
    if period == -1:
        period=end_offset
    segments,_from_index,leftover = [],0,(period-start_digit) % 3
    for _index in xrange(start_digit+3 if not leftover else start_digit+leftover,period,3):
        segments.append(value[_from_index:_index])
        _from_index=_index
    if not segments:
        return value
    segments.append(value[_from_index:])
    return ','.join(segments)

def intcomma_noregex_reversed(value):
    end_offset, start_digit, period = len(value),re_first_num.search(value).start(),value.rfind('.')
    if period == -1:
        period=end_offset
    _from_index,segments = end_offset,[]
    for _index in xrange(period-3,start_digit,-3):
        segments.append(value[_index:_from_index])
        _from_index=_index
    if not segments:
        return value
    segments.append(value[:_from_index])
    return ','.join(reversed(segments))

re_3digits = re.compile(r'(?<=\d)\d{3}(?!\d)')
def intcomma(value):
    segments,last_endoffset=[],len(value)
    while last_endoffset > 3:
        digit_group = re_3digits.search(value,0,last_endoffset)
        if not digit_group:
            break
        segments.append(value[digit_group.start():last_endoffset])
        last_endoffset=digit_group.start()
    if not segments:
        return value
    if last_endoffset:
        segments.append(value[:last_endoffset])
    return ','.join(reversed(segments))

def intcomma_recurs(value):
    """
    Converts an integer to a string containing commas every three digits.
    For example, 3000 becomes '3,000' and 45000 becomes '45,000'.
    """
    new = re.sub("^(-?\d+)(\d{3})", '\g<1>,\g<2>', str(value))
    if value == new:
        return new
    else:
        return intcomma(new)

@contextmanager
def timed(save_time_func):
    begin=time.time()
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        save_time_func(time.time()-begin)

def testset_xsimple(func):
    func('5')

def testset_simple(func):
    func('567')

def testset_onecomma(func):
    func('567890')

def testset_complex(func):
    func('-1234567.024')

def testset_average(func):
    func('-1234567.024')
    func('567')
    func('5674')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print 'Test results:'
    for test_data in ('5','567','1234','1234.56','-253892.045'):
        for func in (intcomma,intcomma_noregex,intcomma_noregex_reversed,intcomma_recurs):
            print func.__name__,test_data,func(test_data)
    times=[]
    def overhead(x):
        pass
    for test_run in xrange(1,4):
        for func in (intcomma,intcomma_noregex,intcomma_noregex_reversed,intcomma_recurs,overhead):
            for testset in (testset_xsimple,testset_simple,testset_onecomma,testset_complex,testset_average):
                for x in xrange(1000): # prime the test
                    testset(func)
                with timed(lambda x:times.append(((test_run,func,testset),x))):
                    for x in xrange(50000):
                        testset(func)
    for (test_run,func,testset),_delta in times:
        print test_run,func.__name__,testset.__name__,_delta

And here are the test results:

intcomma 5 5
intcomma_noregex 5 5
intcomma_noregex_reversed 5 5
intcomma_recurs 5 5
intcomma 567 567
intcomma_noregex 567 567
intcomma_noregex_reversed 567 567
intcomma_recurs 567 567
intcomma 1234 1,234
intcomma_noregex 1234 1,234
intcomma_noregex_reversed 1234 1,234
intcomma_recurs 1234 1,234
intcomma 1234.56 1,234.56
intcomma_noregex 1234.56 1,234.56
intcomma_noregex_reversed 1234.56 1,234.56
intcomma_recurs 1234.56 1,234.56
intcomma -253892.045 -253,892.045
intcomma_noregex -253892.045 -253,892.045
intcomma_noregex_reversed -253892.045 -253,892.045
intcomma_recurs -253892.045 -253,892.045
1 intcomma testset_xsimple 0.0410001277924
1 intcomma testset_simple 0.0369999408722
1 intcomma testset_onecomma 0.213000059128
1 intcomma testset_complex 0.296000003815
1 intcomma testset_average 0.503000020981
1 intcomma_noregex testset_xsimple 0.134000062943
1 intcomma_noregex testset_simple 0.134999990463
1 intcomma_noregex testset_onecomma 0.190999984741
1 intcomma_noregex testset_complex 0.209000110626
1 intcomma_noregex testset_average 0.513000011444
1 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_xsimple 0.124000072479
1 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_simple 0.12700009346
1 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_onecomma 0.230000019073
1 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_complex 0.236999988556
1 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_average 0.56299996376
1 intcomma_recurs testset_xsimple 0.348000049591
1 intcomma_recurs testset_simple 0.34600019455
1 intcomma_recurs testset_onecomma 0.625
1 intcomma_recurs testset_complex 0.773999929428
1 intcomma_recurs testset_average 1.6890001297
1 overhead testset_xsimple 0.0179998874664
1 overhead testset_simple 0.0190000534058
1 overhead testset_onecomma 0.0190000534058
1 overhead testset_complex 0.0190000534058
1 overhead testset_average 0.0309998989105
2 intcomma testset_xsimple 0.0360000133514
2 intcomma testset_simple 0.0369999408722
2 intcomma testset_onecomma 0.207999944687
2 intcomma testset_complex 0.302000045776
2 intcomma testset_average 0.523000001907
2 intcomma_noregex testset_xsimple 0.139999866486
2 intcomma_noregex testset_simple 0.141000032425
2 intcomma_noregex testset_onecomma 0.203999996185
2 intcomma_noregex testset_complex 0.200999975204
2 intcomma_noregex testset_average 0.523000001907
2 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_xsimple 0.130000114441
2 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_simple 0.129999876022
2 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_onecomma 0.236000061035
2 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_complex 0.241999864578
2 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_average 0.582999944687
2 intcomma_recurs testset_xsimple 0.351000070572
2 intcomma_recurs testset_simple 0.352999925613
2 intcomma_recurs testset_onecomma 0.648999929428
2 intcomma_recurs testset_complex 0.808000087738
2 intcomma_recurs testset_average 1.81900000572
2 overhead testset_xsimple 0.0189998149872
2 overhead testset_simple 0.0189998149872
2 overhead testset_onecomma 0.0190000534058
2 overhead testset_complex 0.0179998874664
2 overhead testset_average 0.0299999713898
3 intcomma testset_xsimple 0.0360000133514
3 intcomma testset_simple 0.0360000133514
3 intcomma testset_onecomma 0.210000038147
3 intcomma testset_complex 0.305999994278
3 intcomma testset_average 0.493000030518
3 intcomma_noregex testset_xsimple 0.131999969482
3 intcomma_noregex testset_simple 0.136000156403
3 intcomma_noregex testset_onecomma 0.192999839783
3 intcomma_noregex testset_complex 0.202000141144
3 intcomma_noregex testset_average 0.509999990463
3 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_xsimple 0.125999927521
3 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_simple 0.126999855042
3 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_onecomma 0.235999822617
3 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_complex 0.243000030518
3 intcomma_noregex_reversed testset_average 0.56200003624
3 intcomma_recurs testset_xsimple 0.337000131607
3 intcomma_recurs testset_simple 0.342000007629
3 intcomma_recurs testset_onecomma 0.609999895096
3 intcomma_recurs testset_complex 0.75
3 intcomma_recurs testset_average 1.68300008774
3 overhead testset_xsimple 0.0189998149872
3 overhead testset_simple 0.018000125885
3 overhead testset_onecomma 0.018000125885
3 overhead testset_complex 0.0179998874664
3 overhead testset_average 0.0299999713898
share|improve this answer
    
I thought Daniel Fortunov's one-regex solution would be #1 and beat all the algorithms because regex is so refined/optimized and coded in C, but nope.. I guess the pattern and lookahead's are too expensive. it falls in at about double the time of the intcomma above, even with precompiling the regex. –  parity3 Jul 22 '12 at 19:32

Here is another variant using a generator function that works for integers:

def ncomma(num):
    def _helper(num):
        # assert isinstance(numstr, basestring)
        numstr = '%d' % num
        for ii, digit in enumerate(reversed(numstr)):
            if ii and ii % 3 == 0 and digit.isdigit():
                yield ','
            yield digit

    return ''.join(reversed([n for n in _helper(num)]))

And here's a test:

>>> for i in (0, 99, 999, 9999, 999999, 1000000, -1, -111, -1111, -111111, -1000000):
...     print i, ncomma(i)
... 
0 0
99 99
999 999
9999 9,999
999999 999,999
1000000 1,000,000
-1 -1
-111 -111
-1111 -1,111
-111111 -111,111
-1000000 -1,000,000
share|improve this answer

one liner for python 2.5 and 2.6 (positive int only):

''.join(reversed([x + (',' if i and not i % 3 else '') for i, x in enumerate(reversed(str(1234567)))]))
share|improve this answer

This does money along with the commas

def format_money(money, presym='$', postsym=''):
    fmt = '%0.2f' % money
    dot = string.find(fmt, '.')
    ret = []
    if money < 0 :
        ret.append('(')
        p0 = 1
    else :
        p0 = 0
    ret.append(presym)
    p1 = (dot-p0) % 3 + p0
    while True :
        ret.append(fmt[p0:p1])
        if p1 == dot : break
        ret.append(',')
        p0 = p1
        p1 += 3
    ret.append(fmt[dot:])   # decimals
    ret.append(postsym)
    if money < 0 : ret.append(')')
    return ''.join(ret)
share|improve this answer

For floats:

float(filter(lambda x: x!=',', '1,234.52'))
# returns 1234.52

For ints:

int(filter(lambda x: x!=',', '1,234'))
# returns 1234
share|improve this answer
3  
That removes the commas. While handy, the OP asked for a way to add them. Besides, something like float('1,234.52'.translate(None, ',')) might be more straightforward and possibly faster. –  Dennis Williamson Dec 29 '11 at 23:14

If you don't want to depend on any external libraries:

 s = str(1234567)
 print ','.join([s[::-1][k:k+3][::-1] for k in xrange(len(s)-1, -1, -3)])

This works only for non-negative integers.

share|improve this answer
3  
-1 If the number is less than 1000 it only returns the first digit. –  Pastor Bones May 9 '12 at 5:07
    
That is true. I had the code in an if clause: if len(s) > 3, etc etc –  btk Jun 12 '12 at 20:03
    
Update your example and I'll remove my -1. –  Will Jun 4 '13 at 20:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.