Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am confused between precedence of operators and want to know how this statement would be evaluated.

# include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int k=35;  
  printf("%d %d %d",k==35,k=50,k>40);  
  return 0;  
}

Here k is initially have value 35, when I am testing k in printf I think :

  1. k>40 should be checked which should result in 0
  2. k==35 should be checked and which should result in 1
  3. Lastly 50 should get assigned to k and which should output 50

So final output should be 1 50 0, but output is 0 50 1.

share|improve this question
2  
That's an example of undefined behaviour –  Hanky 웃 Panky Aug 14 '13 at 12:29
    
Operator precedence is irrelevant here. –  harold Aug 14 '13 at 12:31
    
on gcc version 4.4.3 it is 0 50 0 because it is UNDEFINED behaviour :( –  Dayal rai Aug 14 '13 at 12:36
1  
Operator precedence controls how operators are grouped, but not the order in which they are executed - it controls what is evaluated, but not when. –  caf Aug 14 '13 at 12:44
2  
@H2CO3 While the order of evaluation of function parameters is unspecified, I believe that this specific case is also undefined behavior, because k is accessed multiple times between seq. points for other purposes than to determine the value to be stored. C99 6.5/2: Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the prior value shall be read only to determine the value to be stored. –  Lundin Aug 14 '13 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

You can not rely on the output of this program since it is undefined behavior, the evaluation order is not specified in C since that allows the compiler to optimize better, from the C99 draft standard section 6.5 paragraph 3:

The grouping of operators and operands is indicated by the syntax.74) Except as specified later (for the function-call (), &&, ||, ?:, and comma operators), the order of evaluation of subexpressions and the order in which side effects take place are both unspecified.

It is also undefined because you are accessing the value of k and assigning to it in the same sequence point. From draft standard section 6.5 paragraph 2:

Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the prior value shall be read only to determine the value to be stored.

it cites the following code examples as being undefined:

i = ++i + 1;
a[i++] = i; 

Update

There was a comment as to whether the commas in the function call acted as a sequence point or not. If we look at section 6.5.17 Comma operator paragraph 2 says:

The left operand of a comma operator is evaluated as a void expression; there is a sequence point after its evaluation.

but paragraph 3 says:

EXAMPLE As indicated by the syntax, the comma operator (as described in this subclause) cannot appear in contexts where a comma is used to separate items in a list (such as arguments to functions or lists of initializers).

So in this case the comma does not introduce a sequence point.

share|improve this answer

The order in which function arguments are evaluated is not specified. They can be evaluated in any order. The compiler decides.

share|improve this answer

This is undefined behaviour.

You may get any value. Lack of sequence points in two consecutive execution. Increase strictness level for warning and you will get warning: operation on ‘k’ may be undefined.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.