Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I've read about a few alternatives to MySQL's ORDER BY RAND() function, but most of the alternatives apply only to where on a single random result is needed.

Does anyone have any idea how to optimize a query that returns multiple random results, such as this:

   SELECT u.id, 
          p.photo 
     FROM users u, profiles p 
    WHERE p.memberid = u.id 
      AND p.photo != '' 
      AND (u.ownership=1 OR u.stamp=1) 
 ORDER BY RAND() 
    LIMIT 18
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what you're looking for. Why isn't ORDER BY RAND() suitable? Are you mainly concerned with efficiency? – outis Dec 1 '09 at 5:07
    
Yes that's right. I haven't reached even close to the scale presented in your graph and I was already taking a hit. – Tony Dec 2 '09 at 23:28
1  
@outis: Because it doesn't scale - see: dasprids.de/blog/2008/06/07/… – OMG Ponies Mar 1 '10 at 4:17
    
I wrote an article about a solution about a year go: devzone.zend.com/article/… – DASPRiD Aug 26 '10 at 10:02
2  
possible duplicate of What is the best way to pick a random row from a table in MySQL? – outis Jan 18 '12 at 7:09

Here's an alternative, but it is still based on using RAND():

  SELECT u.id, 
         p.photo,
         ROUND(RAND() * x.m_id) 'rand_ind'
    FROM users u, 
         profiles p,
         (SELECT MAX(t.id) 'm_id'
            FROM USERS t) x
   WHERE p.memberid = u.id 
     AND p.photo != '' 
     AND (u.ownership=1 OR u.stamp=1) 
ORDER BY rand_ind
   LIMIT 18

This is slightly more complex, but gave a better distribution of random_ind values:

  SELECT u.id, 
         p.photo,
         FLOOR(1 + RAND() * x.m_id) 'rand_ind'
    FROM users u, 
         profiles p,
         (SELECT MAX(t.id) - 1 'm_id'
            FROM USERS t) x
   WHERE p.memberid = u.id 
     AND p.photo != '' 
     AND (u.ownership=1 OR u.stamp=1) 
ORDER BY rand_ind
   LIMIT 18
share|improve this answer
4  
How multiplying RAND() to a constant value can give better distribution? – zerkms Jul 12 '12 at 3:25
2  
@OMG Ponies: Yep, but you advised that :-) So my question is: why ORDER BY RAND() is worse than ORDER BY RAND() * const? – zerkms Jul 12 '12 at 3:57
3  
I just tried selecting 10 random records on an InnoDB table of slightly over half a million records, and I didn't see any significant performance gains over just using order by rand(). – GordonM Mar 4 '13 at 15:10
2  
Still needs to create a RAND() value for each row, copy the whole data to a temp table and sort that. – Sebastian Jan 20 '15 at 7:48
3  
These forms do not provide any optimization over ORDER BY RAND(). I just ran tests on a one million row table, to compare performance. Averaging the results of 5 runs (discarding the first run), a straight ORDER BY RAND() was actually 11.0% faster. (avg. 2.70 sec vs. 3.04 sec.). – spencer7593 Jun 29 '15 at 0:35

UPDATE 2016

This solution works best using an indexed column.

Here is a simple example of and optimized query bench marked with 100,000 rows.

OPTIMIZED: 300ms

SELECT 
    g.*
FROM
    table g
        JOIN
    (SELECT 
        id
    FROM
        table
    WHERE
        RAND() < (SELECT 
                ((4 / COUNT(*)) * 10)
            FROM
                table)
    ORDER BY RAND()
    LIMIT 4) AS z ON z.id= g.id

note about limit ammount: limit 4 and 4/count(*). The 4s need to be the same number. Changing how many you return doesn't effect the speed that much. Benchmark at limit 4 and limit 1000 are the same. Limit 10,000 took it up to 600ms

note about join: Randomizing just the id is faster than randomizing a whole row. Since it has to copy the entire row into memory then randomize it. The join can be any table that is linked to the subquery Its to prevent tablescans.

note where clause: The where count limits down the ammount of results that are being randomized. It takes a percentage of the results and sorts them rather than the whole table.

note sub query: The if doing joins and extra where clause conditions you need to put them both in the subquery and the subsubquery. To have an accurate count and pull back correct data.

UNOPTIMIZED: 1200ms

SELECT 
    g.*
FROM
    table g
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 4

PROS

4x faster than order by rand(). This solution can work with any table with a indexed column.

CONS

It is a bit complex with complex queries. Need to maintain 2 code bases in the subqueries

share|improve this answer
1  
Very nice. I am going to be sure to use this. – Cayde 6 Mar 15 at 20:20

I ran into this today and was trying to use 'DISTINCT' along with JOINs, but was getting duplicates I assume because the RAND was making each JOINed row distinct. I muddled around a bit and found a solution that works, like this:

SELECT DISTINCT t.id, 
                t.photo 
       FROM (SELECT  u.id, 
                     p.photo,
                     RAND() as rand
                FROM users u, profiles p 
                 WHERE p.memberid = u.id 
                  AND p.photo != '' 
                  AND (u.ownership=1 OR u.stamp=1)
                ORDER BY rand) t
       LIMIT 18
share|improve this answer
    
This seems the exact same thing MySql does when you use ORDER BY RAND(). – rcdmk Nov 28 '13 at 10:26
    
i tested it and if you have a rand value in your result set (as is done in OMG Ponies' solutions), DISTINCT becomes negated. So this was how I got around that. – Joe T Nov 28 '13 at 17:53

The solution I am using is also posted in the link below: How can i optimize MySQL's ORDER BY RAND() function?

I am assuming your users table is going to be larger than your profiles table, if not then it's 1 to 1 cardinality.

If so, I would first do a random selection on user table before joining with profile table.

First do selection:

SELECT *
FROM users
WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1

Then from this pool, pick out random rows through calculated probability. If your table has M rows and you want to pick out N random rows, the probability of random selection should be N/M. Hence:

SELECT *
FROM
(
    SELECT *
    FROM users
    WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1
) as U
WHERE 
    rand() <= $limitCount / (SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1)

Where N is $limitCount and M is the subquery that calculates the table row count. However, since we are working on probability, it is possible to have LESS than $limitCount of rows returned. Therefore we should multiply N by a factor to increase the random pool size.

i.e:

SELECT*
FROM
(
    SELECT *
    FROM users
    WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1
) as U
WHERE 
    rand() <= $limitCount * $factor / (SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1)

I usually set $factor = 2. You can set the factor to a lower value to further reduce the random pool size (e.g. 1.5).

At this point, we would have already limited a M size table down to roughly 2N size. From here we can do a JOIN then LIMIT.

SELECT * 
FROM
(
       SELECT *
        FROM
        (
            SELECT *
            FROM users
            WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1
        ) as U
        WHERE 
            rand() <= $limitCount * $factor / (SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE users.ownership = 1 OR users.stamp = 1)
) as randUser
JOIN profiles
ON randUser.id = profiles.memberid AND profiles.photo != ''
LIMIT $limitCount

On a large table, this query will outperform a normal ORDER by RAND() query.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Create a column or join to a select with random numbers (generated in for example php) and order by this column.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.