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How can we make a user pass an eventHandler, which uses a stateMonad but is invoked in a separate thread? For example the in the following example, how should the forkIO be called so that eventHandler can invoke operate? I am new to Haskell, please correct me if this is a wrong api to expose to users?

data MyTypeResult a = MyTypeValue a
data MyTypeState = MyTypeState {_counter :: Int}

newtype MyType a = MyType {
      unMyType :: StateT MyTypeState IO (MyTypeResult a)
}

instance Monad MyType where
    (>>=) = myTypeBind
    return = myTypeReturn
    fail = myTypeFail

myTypeBind = undefined
myTypeReturn = undefined
myTypeFail = undefined

type Event = String
type Handler =  Event -> MyType ()

doSomethingAwesome :: MyType Event
doSomethingAwesome = undefined

operate :: String -> MyType ()
operate = undefined

start :: Handler -> MyType ()
start h = do
  event <- doSomethingAwesome
  --forkIO $ h event -- The line that is troubling
  return ()

testHandler :: Event -> MyType()
testHandler _ = operate "abcd"

myMain = start testHandler
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Are you going to be forking many of these state computations? Will each of these forked computations share the same state? –  Gabriel Gonzalez Aug 14 '13 at 14:29
    
Yes, I plan to fork and call the handler a lot of times. Yes the forked computations will share the same state (the part of state that will be used in these computations is thread safe) –  Akshat Aug 14 '13 at 14:34
    
What is the initial state you intend to give the handler? You need to provide an initial state in order to run a 'StateT' computation using 'runStateT' or 'evalStateT'. –  danidiaz Aug 14 '13 at 15:49
    
@DanielDíazCarrete You are correct. My mistake (and hopefully now fixed). The handler is being called inside the MyType monad (which is why the forkIO is not working) –  Akshat Aug 14 '13 at 16:08
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot have a State computation running in multiple threads sharing the same state because behind the scenes, the State monad is nothing more than a chain of function calls that passes the state value on to the next function in the chain.

For multithreaded code you can replace StateT s IO with ReaderT (IORef s) IO and use

forkIO $ runReaderT (h event) stateVar

to fork new threads (where stateVar is an IORef that contains the shared state).

Inside the ReaderT stack, you read the current shared state with

stateVar <- ask
s <- lift $ readIORef stateVar

and update it with

stateVar <- ask
lift $ atomicModifyIORef stateVar f

where f is a pure function that takes the current state and returns the modified state plus an auxiliary result.

If you need anything more fancy (e.g. modify the state using monadic functions), then you should use either MVar or TVar instead of IORef.

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This is a very interesting solutions. Will try it out. –  Akshat Aug 14 '13 at 16:10
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While it's true you cannot have multiple StateT s IO actions running in multiple threads, all sharing the same s state, you can have a StateT s IO running in a thread with its state in isolation from others using monad-control and lifted-base.

I recently stumbled on these packages, it's quite amazing. Heres a simple example

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-}

import Control.Concurrent.Lifted
import Control.Monad.Base
import Control.Monad.Trans.Control
import Control.Monad.State

t :: IO Int -> StateT Int IO ()
t io = replicateM_ 10 $ do
    x <- get
    y <- liftIO io
    liftIO $ print x
    put $ x + y

async :: MonadBaseControl IO m => (IO a -> m ()) -> m (a -> IO ())
async thread = do
    mvar <- liftBase newEmptyMVar
    fork $ thread (takeMVar mvar)
    return $ liftBase . putMVar mvar

main :: IO ()
main = evalStateT (async t) 0 >>= forM_ [1..10]

Basically, as long as your monad is a transformer stack over IO, you can fork, handle exceptions or any other IO specific actions "inside" your transformer stack.

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forkIO won't work from inside MyType until you use liftIO by implementing MonadIO class for MyType OR you can make MyType just a type synonym and do:

data MyTypeResult a = MyTypeValue a
data MyTypeState = MyTypeState {_counter :: Int}

type MyType a = StateT MyTypeState IO (MyTypeResult a)

type Event = String
type Handler =  Event -> MyType ()

doSomethingAwesome :: MyType Event
doSomethingAwesome = undefined

operate :: String -> MyType ()
operate = undefined

start :: Handler -> MyType ()
start h = do
    MyTypeValue event <- doSomethingAwesome
    st <- get
    liftIO $ forkIO $ runStateT (h event) st >> (return ())
    return $ MyTypeValue ()

testHandler :: Event -> MyType()
testHandler _ = operate "abcd"

myMain = start testHandler
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