Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a string in the following format:

string1:string2:string3:string4:string5

I'm trying to use sed to split the string on : and print each sub-string on a new line. Here is what I'm doing:

cat ~/Desktop/myfile.txt | sed s/:/\\n/

This prints:

string1
string2:string3:string4:string5

How can I get it to split on each delimiter?

share|improve this question
2  
global flag? /g? – Jiminion Aug 14 '13 at 14:25
3  
You could consider tr : '\n' <~/Desktop/myfile.txt. Since sed can open files quite happily, you don't need to use cat in your example from the question. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 14 '13 at 15:28
up vote 19 down vote accepted

You missed the g after the substitution. Hence, it is just done once. See:

$ echo "string1:string2:string3:string4:string5" | sed s/:/\\n/g
string1
string2
string3
string4
string5

g stands for global and means that the substitution has to be done globally, that is, for any occurrence. See that the default is 1 and if you put for example 2, it is done 2 times, etc.

All together, in your case you would need to use:

sed 's/:/\\n/g' ~/Desktop/myfile.txt

Note that you can directly use the sed ... file syntax, instead of unnecessary piping: cat file | sed.

share|improve this answer
    
Damnit! I was so close. What does the g do? And I'll accept your answer as soon as I can. Thanks! – free_mind Aug 14 '13 at 14:24
    
It stands for global and means that the substitution has to be done globally, that is, for any ocurrence. See that the default is 1 and if you put for example 2, it is done 2 times, etc. – fedorqui Aug 14 '13 at 14:26

Using \n in sed is non-portable. The portable way to do what you want with sed is:

sed 's/:/\
/g' ~/Desktop/myfile.txt

but in reality this isn't a job for sed anyway, it's the job tr was created to do:

tr ':' '
' < ~/Desktop/myfile.txt
share|improve this answer

Using simply :

$ tr ':' $'\n' <<< string1:string2:string3:string4:string5
string1
string2
string3
string4
string5

If you really need :

$ sed 's/:/\n/g' <<< string1:string2:string3:string4:string5
string1
string2
string3
string4
string5
share|improve this answer

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 'y/:/\n/' file

or perhaps:

sed y/:/$"\n"/ file
share|improve this answer

This should do it:

cat ~/Desktop/myfile.txt | sed s/:/\\n/g
share|improve this answer
2  
Useless use of cat – Gilles Quenot Aug 14 '13 at 16:48

If you're using gnu sed then you can use \x0A for newline:

sed 's/:/\x0A/g' ~/Desktop/myfile.txt
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.