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I'm trying to work with the .NET AJAX autocompletion extension. The extension is expecting the following...

public static string[] GetCompletionList(string prefixText, int count, string contextKey)

My database queries are in a LINQ var object. I'm getting compile-time errors about not being able to convert type IQueryable to string[].

InventoryDataContext assets = new InventoryDataContext();
    var assetsInStorage = from a in assets.Assets
                          where a.Name.Contains(prefixText)
                          orderby a.Name ascending
                          select new[] { a.Manufacturer.Name, a.Name };
    return (string[])assetsInStorage;
share|improve this question
    
I suspect you need to replace a.Name.Contains or you'll get values like "Jim Bob" when prefixText is "Bob"... – NVRAM Dec 1 '09 at 1:51
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I fixed it with the following.. let concat = a.Manufacturer.Name + " " + a.Name + " (" + a.AssetID + ")" + a.ProductDivision.ProductDivision1 + a.Location.Name – omencat Dec 1 '09 at 20:45
up vote 8 down vote accepted

In order to get an string[] at first you must select only one string property on your query, not an anonymous object:

var assetsInStorage = from a in assets.Assets
                      where a.Name.Contains(prefixText)
                      orderby a.Name ascending
                      select a.Manufacturer.Name; // or a.Name

assetsInStorage at this moment is an IEnumerable<string>, and then you should convert it to string[] by:

return assetsInStorage.ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Better wording... thanks CMS :) – John Weldon Dec 1 '09 at 1:37
    
Yes, I confirm this works. Is it possible to concat two fields in the select statement though? – omencat Dec 1 '09 at 1:40
    
yes... the selection just has to return a string. – John Weldon Dec 1 '09 at 1:41
    
@John: Thank you!, Bay: just concatenate them in the select: select a.Name + " " + a.Manufacturer.Name; – CMS Dec 1 '09 at 1:46
    
Ugh... so simple. Thanks again CMS, et al – omencat Dec 1 '09 at 1:47

Your assetsInStorage doesn't appear to be an IEnumerable<string>... as such, you'd have to project your anonymous type into a string.

assetsInStorage.Select(a=>a[0] + a[1])

(Or however you want to convert that anonymouns type to a string.)

And then you can return .ToArray():

return assetsInStorage.Select(a=>a[0]+a[1]).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
It is an IEnumerable<T> since IQueryable<T> inherits from IEnumerable<T>. – Andrew Hare Dec 1 '09 at 1:34
    
Yes but T is not a string but an anonymous type – John Weldon Dec 1 '09 at 1:36
    
T is not an anonymous type but a string array. – Joel Mueller Dec 1 '09 at 5:20

If you want a single array that contains both a.Manufacturer.Name and a.Name for each of the assets, you can do that with a slight modification of CMS's answer:

var assetsInStorage = from a in assets.Assets
                      where a.Name.Contains(prefixText)
                      orderby a.Name ascending
                      select new[] { a.Manufacturer.Name, a.Name };

At this point, assetsInStorage is an IEnumerable<string[]> which also counts as an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<string>>. We can flatten this down to a single IEnumerable<string> using SelectMany and then turn it into an array.

return assetsInStorage.SelectMany(a => a).ToArray();

In this way, you're not required to select only a single string value.

share|improve this answer

This should do the trick:

InventoryDataContext assets = new InventoryDataContext();
var assetsInStorage = from a in assets.Assets                          
   where a.Name.Contains(prefixText)
   orderby a.Name ascending
   select String.Concat(x.ManufacturerName, " ", x.Name);    

return assetsInStorage.ToArray();

EDITED based on comment... EF is able to interpret String.Concat(), so the additional enumeration wasn't necessary.

share|improve this answer
1  
The ToList() not necessary, no matter which of those frameworks you're using. The ToArray() call at the end will cause the result set to be enumerated before the underlying connection is closed anyway - there's no point to forcing enumeration twice. – Joel Mueller Dec 1 '09 at 5:13

Try:

return assetsInStorage.ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't address the issue that the Enumerable<T> is not of a string but an anonymous type holding an array of two strings – John Weldon Dec 1 '09 at 1:38
    
Oops. I was viewing this on my iPhone and it truncated the line and I didn't see the second parameter being passed in there ... that'll teach me! – Michael Gattuso Dec 1 '09 at 1:45
    
@John - Actually, the OP's code is not creating an anonymous type holding an array of two strings - it's just an array of two strings. So the output is IEnumerable<string[]>. – Joel Mueller Dec 1 '09 at 5:19

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