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I'm writing my first AJAX driven website and some parts of it are kind of slow. For example, I'll click a button to change the page, and it might take three seconds for the new page to appear.

Chrome developer tools shows the network activity for the page being changed as follows:

DNS Lookup ​1 ms

Connecting ​45 ms

SSL ​21 ms

Sending ​0

Waiting ​1.89 s

Receiving ​73 ms

The size of the above request was 49.1 KB.

Clearly the "Waiting" time is where the slowdown is occurring. My question is, what is causing this "waiting" time? Is it something to do with the jQuery AJAX request, or is it because the MySQL database is slow, or something in a PHP file causing a delay?

Without seeing my project and debugging it first-hand, you may not be able to answer that question. If that's the case, how should I go about determining which part of the application is slowing things down?

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closed as too broad by Elias Van Ootegem, tereško, Ben, RaYell, Felix Mar 18 '14 at 6:51

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Clicking something that fetches an entire new page is not what you should ajax for. Things like that are better left to links (that's what they're for). Ajax gets little slivers of info/content that get injected into the current DOM – Elias Van Ootegem Aug 14 '13 at 14:56
    
@EliasVanOotegem - Changing the page was just an example. In my application, there is data being displayed in a spreadsheet-like format. When the user clicks a button, new data is fetched and displayed. This is where the slowdown is happening (among other places). – Nate Aug 14 '13 at 15:00
    
Ok, perhaps be a tad more specific, but on the whole, this question is just too broad. The bottleneck could be anything, from your JS code, the test environment, your server setup, the storage engine used, the size of the data... there's nothing really anyone can say with a 100% certainty, that will double your performance. – Elias Van Ootegem Aug 14 '13 at 15:08
    
@EliasVanOotegem - The bottleneck could be anything, from your JS code, the test environment, your server setup, the storage engine used, the size of the data... Exactly, so what I'm asking is, how do I narrow it down? – Nate Aug 14 '13 at 15:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without seeing my project and debugging it first-hand, you may not be able to answer that question. If that's the case, how should I go about determining which part of the application is slowing things down?

That depends on your debug tools. At the most basic level, comment out parts of your server-side code and check how much the "waiting" time drops.

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I don't know anything about profiling MySQL/PHP applications (in django, you could use django-debug-toolbar), but Ajax queries are good candidates to cache in both DB and app output layers.

Consider using a cache system like memcached.

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