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running the following script to rename all .jpg files in the current folder works well sometimes, but it often deletes one or more files it is renaming. How would I write a script to rename files without deleting them in the process? This is running on Mac OSX 10.8 using GNU bash, version 3.2.48

this is an example file listing I would change for illustration:

original files

red.jpg
blue.jpg
green.jpg

renamed files if counter is set to 5

file_5.jpg
file_6.jpg
file_7.jpg

instead I get usually lose one or more files

#!/bin/bash  

counter=5

for file in *.jpg; do

    echo renaming "$file" to "file_${counter}.jpg";
    mv "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg";
    let "counter+=1";

done

** UPDATE **

it no longer seems to be deleting files, but the output is still not as expected. for example:

file_3.jpg
file_4.jpg

turns into

file_3.jpg
file_5.jpg

when counter is set to 4, when the expected output is

file_4.jpg
file_5.jpg

-

#!/bin/bash  

counter=3

for file in *.jpg; do

    if [[ -e file_${counter}.jpg ]] ; then
        echo Skipping "$file", file exists.
    else
        echo renaming "$file" to "file_${counter}.jpg"
        mv "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg"
    fi

    let "counter+=1"

done
share|improve this question
1  
Are you saying that one of the three 'coloured' JPG files goes missing when given a number — that you have a reproducible test case with the 3 input and (nominally) 3 output files cited in the question? Or does it happen under other circumstances superficially similar to the colours/numbers example? Are any of the original file names in the same format as the revised file names? – Jonathan Leffler Aug 14 '13 at 15:04
    
I guess it happens only if some files are already named file_*.jpg – waspinator Aug 14 '13 at 15:33
up vote 10 down vote accepted

The problem is that some of the files already have names corresponding to the target names. For example, if there are files

file_1.jpg
file_7.jpg

and you start with counter=7, you overwrite file_7.jpg with file_1.jpg in the first step, and then rename it to file_8.jpg.

You can use mv -n to prevent clobbering (if supported), or test for existence before running the command

if [[ -e file_${counter}.jpg ]] ; then
    echo Skipping "$file", file exists.
else
    mv "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg"
fi
share|improve this answer
    
this helps in that it no longer deletes files, but it still has unexpected renaming behavior in certain situations as described in the questions update. – waspinator Aug 14 '13 at 15:24
1  
@waspinator: Then create a temporary directory, move all files there under the new names, move them back at the end and remove the dir. – choroba Aug 14 '13 at 15:41
    
ok, that seems like the easiest solution. Thanks. – waspinator Aug 14 '13 at 15:59

I think you are glazing over an obvious problem with the glob. If the glob matches file_2.jpg, it will try and create file_file_2.jpg (I don't mean that in the literal sense, just that you will be reprocessing files you already processed). To solve this, you need to make sure your initial glob expression doesn't match the files you have already moved:

shopt -s extglob

i=0
for f in !(file_*).jpg ; do
    while [[ -e "file_${i}.jpg" ]] ; do
        (( i++ ))
    done

    mv -v "$f" "file_$i.jpg"
    (( i++ ))
done
share|improve this answer

What choroba said is correct. You can also use:

mv "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg" -n

to simply neglect the move when the destination filename already exists, or

mv "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg" -i

to ask whether it should overwrite or not.

share|improve this answer

Instead of iterating over *.jpg you should skip your already renamed files i.e. file_[0-9]*.jpg and run your loop like this:

counter=5

while read file; do
   echo renaming "$file" to "file_${counter}.jpg";
   mv -n "$file" "file_${counter}.jpg";
   let "counter+=1";
done < <(find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.jpg" -not -name "file_[0-9]*.jpg")
share|improve this answer

Another way is to continue your counting until a file does not exist:

#!/bin/bash  

counter=1
shopt -s extglob

for file in *.jpg; do
    [[ $file == ?(*/)file_+([[:digit:]]).jpg ]] && continue

    until
        newname=file_$(( counter++ )).jpg
        [[ ! -e $newname ]]
    do
        continue
    done

    echo "renaming $file to $newname.";

    mv -i "$file" "$newname" ## Remove the -i option if you think it's safe already.
done

When doing things recursively:

#!/bin/bash  

shopt -s  extglob    
counter=1

while read file; do
    dirprefix=${file%%+([^/])

    until
        newfile=$dirprefix/file_$(( counter++ )).jpg
        [[ ! -e $newfile ]]
    do
        continue
    done

    echo "renaming $file to $newfile."

    mv -i "$file" "$newfile" ## Remove the -i option if you think it's safe already.
done < <(find -type f -name '*.jpg' -and -not -regex '^.*/file_[0-9]\+$')
share|improve this answer

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