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THE QUESTION HAS BEEN EDITED, PLEASE READ EDIT FIRST.

Im using groupby method to group data in a dataframe and then use the outcome to modify the dataframe (for example, changing a bool value in one of its columns) I've tried the modification in two ways:

  1. modify the df outside an groupby.apply method - this changes the df but when entering the applied method again, those changes are gone.

  2. modify the df by applying a modification method via groupby. this does not change the df and changes do not take effect next time im entering an applied method.

So either way, the groupby.apply always referring to the original df, no matter how and if it was modified.

to illustrate:

In [1]:

df = DataFrame({'a':[1,1,1,3,3,3],'b':[2,2,2,4,4,4],'c':[True,True,True,True,True,True]})
df
Out[1]:
a   b   c
0    1   2   True
1    1   2   True
2    1   2   True
3    3   4   True
4    3   4   True
5    3   4   True

now using groupby:

In [2]:

def modify(grp):
    if grp.name==1:
        grp.c = False

def print_group(grp):
    print '\ngroup value is:' + str(grp.name) 
    print grp.c

gb = df.groupby('a')
gb.apply(modify);
gb.apply(print_group);

group value is:1
0    True
1    True
2    True
Name: c, dtype: bool

group value is:3
3    True
4    True
5    True
Name: c, dtype: bool

So no change to the 'c' column

Now if im modifying the df outside:

In [3]:

df.ix[df.a==1,'c'] = False
df
Out[3]:
a   b   c
0    1   2   False
1    1   2   False
2    1   2   False
3    3   4   True
4    3   4   True
5    3   4   True

In [4]:

gb.apply(print_group);

group value is:1
0    True
1    True
2    True
Name: c, dtype: bool

group value is:3
3    True
4    True
5    True
Name: c, dtype: bool

So it seems that by using groupby, a copy of the df is created, and changes applied to it by .apply, goes where? What is going on under the hood here? And how do I make it work as necessary? running .groupby again every time I'm modifying an element in the df? that sounds extremely expansive and redundant to me.. Can someone explain?

EDIT:

I understand now the source for most of my problems using groupby. To my taste, the groupby mechanism is logically too ambiguous and the design encourages the user to use it in the wrong why. The way I saw this, the whole idea behinds data analysis with pandas is to group and apply. I thought grouping is the most expensive task, so I imagined the proper use would be to group only once, and then do what ever you want with the groups. as long as the group members dont change, you shouldn't regroup a dataframe. This idea is also implied from the design, as you can save a groupby object, which for me implies that the author of pandas wanted as to create a groupby object only once.

from the answer below me, though, and from the "inconsistency" that ill describe below, It seems this is not the right use. I'm now beginning to think the proper use is to regroup for each operation, even if the groups themselves didn't change. I don't know if that really regroups or just using a grouping object which is a member of the dataframe. (if the same grouping was done in the past).

bottom line, I missed used the groupby operation, which gave me strange results, as you can see here:

first, i defined the following function:

In [138]:

from pandas import *
def modify(grp):
    if grp.name==1:
        grp.c = False
    return grp
def print_group(grp):
    print '\ngroup value is:' + str(grp.name) 
    print grp.c

then, two similar operations gave me different result, an "inconsistency" allegedly:

In [165]:

df = DataFrame({'a':[1,1,3,3],'b':[2,2,4,4],'c':[True,True,True,True]})
gb = df.groupby('a')
df = gb.apply(modify);
gb.apply(print_group);
df
group value is:1
0    True
1    True
Name: c, dtype: bool
group value is:3
2    True
3    True
Name: c, dtype: bool
Out[165]:
a   b   c
0    1   2   False
1    1   2   False
2    3   4   True
3    3   4   True

Here i changed df by assigning it the results of the modify function, then I called the printing function to see if the it "sees" the change. as can be seen, it is not.

trying something a little different, gave different results:

In [168]:

df = DataFrame({'a':[1,1,3,3],'b':[2,2,4,4],'c':[True,True,True,True]})
gb = df.groupby('a')
df.ix[df.a==1,'c'] = False
gb.apply(print_group);
df
group value is:1
0    False
1    False
Name: c, dtype: bool
group value is:3
2    True
3    True
Name: c, dtype: bool
Out[168]:
a   b   c
0    1   2   False
1    1   2   False
2    3   4   True
3    3   4   True

Here I created a dataframe, created a groupby object, changed the dataframe inplace (that is important) and then called the printing function to see if groupby object "sees" the change. it did. earlier in this post, it didnt (see In[3], In[4] and Out[4] in the original post)

So as you can see, something is very inconsistent here. Here is my explanation to all this mess:

  1. in the first case, when I assigned to df what returned from the modifying function, I actually created a new variable in memory. the groupby object was reffering to a differnt df variable, i.e. a different place in memory. thus the df holding differnt info than what groupby "sees".

  2. In the second case, the changes was made "inplace", i.e. in the same memory allocation. therefore groupby saw what df saw.

  3. in the original case (see In[3], In[4] and Out[4]) the changes were made to df, but in a new place in memory. so groupby referd to one place, and the modified df to a different place.

It seems that changing a dataframe by df[cond,'culomn_name'], which was suggested here not to create a copy but a view of the dataframe, might be creating a view, but in a different memory allocation (i.e a copy of the df is made in a memory spot,changed, and than the original name is assigned the location of the new memory spot, leaving the groupby element referring to now abandoned memory location)

This is the only way I can explain those results. Would like your confirmation on that. The only solution i see to that improper use is to call groupby each and every time. One can only hope that df.groupby saves a groupby object as a member of the df, so if the same groupby call is being made again and again, it is not called every time from scratch.

If Im right, the linkage between a groupby element to a dataframe is quite weak, and the results of several dataframe modifications and groupby operations cannot be fully anticipated. So what is the solution? running groupby for each and every apply operation? that seems redundant..

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You just need to return the frame in your function. Apply takes the output of the function and creates a new frame (of the applied data); if you return None in your function then it uses the original (and if you don't return a value, then you are implicity returning None)

In [22]: def f(x):
   ....:     if x.name == 1:
   ....:         x.c = False
   ....:     return x
   ....: 

In [24]: df.groupby('a').apply(f)
Out[24]: 
   a  b      c
0  1  2  False
1  1  2  False
2  1  2  False
3  3  4   True
4  3  4   True
5  3  4   True
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, didn't get it completely.. what do you mean by "if you return NONE n your function then it uses the original" you mean that the underlying dataframe is determined according to my apply function returning or not returning a value? Im still confused about what going on under the hood here. I thought that a groupby object simply holds the index of all gruop and their members. but this is clearly not so. So what, groupby object holds a copy of the original dataframe? Please elaborate more and be more clear.. –  idoda Aug 15 '13 at 8:37
    
also, this implies regrouping the dataframe for each apply operation, which can be expensive and redundent (see my edits..) –  idoda Aug 15 '13 at 11:05
    
Maybe you can explain in a simple example what your problem is. Optimizing is often the last step. Make sure you have correctness first. Profile, THEN optimize if needed. Groupby is a cheap operation; the apply can be more expensive. But unless you have LOTS of groups this shouldn't matter. –  Jeff Aug 15 '13 at 11:28
    
Im doing a similar thing to what you see here, only in much larger scales. I have groups containing overlapping indexes. for example, imagine a data frame indexed by files, containing two groups which have overlap in the index (i.e. some files belong to both groups). now im doing an iterative process, in which in each step im choosing files by some critiria, then im marking the used files by setting the 'isUsed' column in my dataframe to true for the choosen files. then im choosing files again and vice versa until I choose all files. –  idoda Aug 15 '13 at 12:36
    
why don't you group by both columns then? If your process is iterative then just groupby (and apply after each iteration) –  Jeff Aug 15 '13 at 13:07

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