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public abstract class A
{
    // constructors omitted

    public abstract A Create(SomeData data);
}

public class B : A
{
    // constructors omitted

    public override A Create(SomeData data)
    {
        return new B(data);
    }
}

What I want is to be able to make the Create method static, so that I can get an instance of B without having to create a useless instance with an empty constructor. (If you're wondering why, A is actually a generic type of the form A<TFoo, TBar>, where TBar corresponds to the derived types. As we all know, you can't instantiate a generic type using a constructor that takes any arguments.)

I am already aware that static methods are decoupled from the object hierarchy, only relying on the name of the type. That means I can't have Create as an abstract method that I force all descendants to implement. Is there another way I can implement this pattern?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is simply no way to do this. Inheritance is based off of instance methods in C# and has no equivalent feature for static methods. Another way to implement this pattern though is to require a lambda in lieu of a static method.

For example (you mentioned the actual type was A<TFoo, TBar>)

void UseIt<TFoo, TBar>(A<TFoo, TBar> p, Func<SomeData, TBar> func) {
  TBar b = func();  
  ...
}

The consumer doesn't care if Create is static, instance or even called create. Generally all they care about is having a function which takes a SomeData and returns a TBar. Delegates fit this pattern exactly.

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My actual use case is creating instances of the derived type in methods that are implemented in the abstract base class. For example, every type TBar derived from A should have a Clone method that is implemented exactly the same way: instantiate a new TBar with some data stored in a field. I was hoping to be able to pull off something like TBar.Create(_MyData). This Clone method might have to be invoked within A, so naturally I can't pass it a lambda that instantiates TBar. I'm sorry if I'm being unclear, please bear with me. –  Asad Aug 14 '13 at 16:25
    
@Asad why can't you pass a lambda exactly? In any situation where a static method would work a lambda would also be available. It may be simply that you need to pass the lambda into the constructor of A<TFoo, TBar> to make this happen though –  JaredPar Aug 14 '13 at 16:42
    
Yes, it works if the lambda is passed in externally. Within the body of A though, TBar is a type parameter, and can't be instantiated with arguments (through a lambda or otherwise). I guess I could add a parameter for the lambda to the constructor for A and store it in a field, although this means I have to pass in a lambda that instantiates the right derived type every time I want to instantiate an A. –  Asad Aug 14 '13 at 16:51
    
@Asad that is essentially the solution I was proposing. –  JaredPar Aug 14 '13 at 16:54
    
I understand, I was just thinking out loud. –  Asad Aug 14 '13 at 16:55

Something like this might work, depends on your requirements

public abstract class A
{
    public string Data { get; set; }
    public static T Create<T>(string data) where T : A, new()
    {
        return new T() { Data = data };
    }
}

public class B : A { }

then can do

A foo = A.Create<B>("foo");
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This is a good idea, but Data is modeled as read only (all derived types of A are supposed to be immutable). Is there a way to get around this without making Data settable? –  Asad Aug 14 '13 at 20:37

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