Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following example code

<?php

class Test {
    function foo() {
        print "foo\n";
    }

    function bar() {
        $func = 'foo';
        $func();
    }
}

$test = new Test();
$test->bar()

which calls $test-bar(), whiich internally calls a variable php function named foo. This variable contains the string foo and I want the function foo be called like here. Instead of getting the expected output

foo

I get an error:

PHP Fatal error:  Call to undefined function foo()  ...

How to do this right, when using a string for the function-name? The string 'func' might denote several different functions inside the class scope in the actual code.

According to the doc the above should work like I have coded, more or less...

share|improve this question
    
0_0 How about using data structures rather than horrors like $func = 'foo'; $func();? –  Jack Maney Aug 14 '13 at 17:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
<?php

class Test {
    public function foo() {
        print "foo\n";
    }

    public function bar() {
        $func = 'foo';
        $this->$func();
    }
}

$test = new Test();
$test->bar();

?>

Use this for accessing the current function of this class

share|improve this answer
1  
codepad.org/j4x0c4Du - works –  Brendan Bullen Aug 14 '13 at 17:35
    
Thanks, that is what I was looking for. Maybe someone could add this to the php docs...? –  Alex Aug 14 '13 at 17:36
    
yes dear . its logical one . –  Suresh Kumar Amrani Aug 14 '13 at 17:37

What you can do is use the function call_user_func() to invoke the callback.

<?php

class Test {
    public function foo() {
        print "foo\n";
    }

    public function bar() {
        $func = 'foo';
        call_user_func(array($this, $func));
    }
}

$test = new Test();
$test->bar();
share|improve this answer

You use the keyword $this

<?php

class Test {
    function foo() {
        print "foo\n";
    }

    function bar() {
        $this->foo(); //  you can do this

    }
}

$test = new Test();
$test->bar()

There are two ways to call a method from a string input:

$methodName = "foo";
$this->$methodName();

Or you can use call_user_func_array()

call_user_func_array("foo",$args); // args is an array of your arguments

or

call_user_func_array(array($this,"foo"),$args); // will call the method in this scope
share|improve this answer
    
I do not want to call the function directly, I need a string with the function's name. I have updated the question to make this point clear. Sorry. –  Alex Aug 14 '13 at 17:30
    
I see, there are two ways to do it, see my update –  Ibu Aug 14 '13 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.