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I could use some help. I have an algorithm I perform where the user can pass between 1 and 5 coefficients. The number of coefficients determines how many for loops I need to use in my algorithm. I currently have 5 private methods to perform the work (I made them private so the user doesn't have to worry about which one to call) and 1 public method which the user can see. The public method has the sole purpose of calling the appropriate private method based on the number of arguments:

public Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int[] coefficients)
{
    switch (coefficients.Length)
    {
        case 1: return GetResults(state, coefficients[0]);
        case 2: return GetResults(state, coefficients[0], coefficients[1]);
        case 3: return GetResults(state, coefficients[0], coefficients[1], coefficients[2]);
        case 4: return GetResults(state, coefficients[0], coefficients[1], coefficients[2], coefficients[3]);
        case 5: return GetResults(state, coefficients[0], coefficients[1], coefficients[2], coefficients[3], coefficients[4]);
        default:
            throw new ArgumentException("Invalid number of inputs: " + coefficients.Length);
    }
}

My private methods are shown below. You'll notice that there is a lot of duplicated code.

private Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int A)
{
    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(new int[] { A });
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2, analysis.Coefficients.Length - 1));
    int numberOfInputs = state.Inputs.Length;
    for (int a = 0; a < numberOfInputs ; a++)
    {
        int resultsFound = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++)
            resultsFound += Calculate(analysis, state.Outputs, state.Bandwidth,
                                new Component(signs[i][0], A, state.Inputs[a], frequencyFormat));
        if (!ReportProgress(state, combinations, resultsFound))
            return null;
    }            

    return analysis;
}

private Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int A, int B)
{
    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(new int[] { A, B });
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2, analysis.Coefficients.Length - 1));
    int numberOfInputs = state.Inputs.Length;
    for (int a = 0; a < numberOfInputs ; a++)
    {
        for (int b = 0; b < numberOfInputs ; b++)
        {
            if (a == b)
                continue;

            int resultsFound = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++)
                resultsFound += Calculate(analysis, state.Outputs, state.Bandwidth,
                                    new Component(signs[i][1], A, state.Inputs[a], frequencyFormat),
                                    new Component(signs[i][0], B, state.Inputs[b], frequencyFormat));
            if (!ReportProgress(state, combinations, resultsFound))
                return null;
        }
    }

    return analysis;
}

private Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int A, int B, int C)
{
    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(new int[] { A, B, C });
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2, analysis.Coefficients.Length - 1));
    int numberOfInputs = state.Inputs.Length;
    for (int a = 0; a < numberOfInputs ; a++)
    {
        for (int b = 0; b < numberOfInputs ; b++)
        {
            if (a == b)
                continue;

            for (int c = 0; c < numberOfInputs ; c++)
            {
                if (a == c || b == c)
                    continue;

                int resultsFound = 0;
                for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++)
                    resultsFound += Calculate(analysis, state.Outputs, state.Bandwidth,
                                        new Component(signs[i][2], A, state.Inputs[a], frequencyFormat),
                                        new Component(signs[i][1], B, state.Inputs[b], frequencyFormat),
                                        new Component(signs[i][0], C, state.Inputs[c], frequencyFormat));
                if (!ReportProgress(state, combinations, resultsFound))
                    return null;
            }
        }
    }

    return analysis;
}

private Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int A, int B, int C, int D)
{
    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(new int[] { A, B, C, D });
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2, analysis.Coefficients.Length - 1));
    int numberOfInputs = state.Inputs.Length;
    for (int a = 0; a < numberOfInputs ; a++)
    {
        for (int b = 0; b < numberOfInputs ; b++)
        {
            if (a == b)
                continue;

            for (int c = 0; c < numberOfInputs ; c++)
            {
                if (a == c || b == c)
                    continue;

                for (int d = 0; d < numberOfInputs ; d++)
                {
                    if (a == d || b == d || c == d)
                        continue;

                    int resultsFound = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++)
                        resultsFound += Calculate(analysis, state.Outputs, state.Bandwidth,
                                            new Component(signs[i][3], A, state.Inputs[a], frequencyFormat),
                                            new Component(signs[i][2], B, state.Inputs[b], frequencyFormat),
                                            new Component(signs[i][1], C, state.Inputs[c], frequencyFormat),
                                            new Component(signs[i][0], D, state.Inputs[d], frequencyFormat));
                    if (!ReportProgress(state, combinations, resultsFound))
                        return null;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return analysis;
}

private Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int A, int B, int C, int D, int E)
{
    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(new int[] { A, B, C, D, E });
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2, analysis.Coefficients.Length - 1));
    int numberOfInputs = state.Inputs.Length;
    for (int a = 0; a < numberOfInputs ; a++)
    {
        for (int b = 0; b < numberOfInputs ; b++)
        {
            if (a == b)
                continue;

            for (int c = 0; c < numberOfInputs ; c++)
            {
                if (a == c || b == c)
                    continue;

                for (int d = 0; d < numberOfInputs ; d++)
                {
                    if (a == d || b == d || c == d)
                        continue;

                    for (int e = 0; e < numberOfInputs ; e++)
                    {
                        if (a == e || b == e || c == e || d == e)
                            continue;

                        int resultsFound = 0;
                        for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++)
                            resultsFound += Calculate(analysis, state.Outputs, state.Bandwidth,
                                                new Component(signs[i][4], A, state.Inputs[a], frequencyFormat),
                                                new Component(signs[i][3], B, state.Inputs[b], frequencyFormat),
                                                new Component(signs[i][2], C, state.Inputs[c], frequencyFormat),
                                                new Component(signs[i][1], D, state.Inputs[d], frequencyFormat),
                                                new Component(signs[i][0], E, state.Inputs[e], frequencyFormat));
                        if (!ReportProgress(state, combinations, resultsFound))
                            return null;
                    }
                }                       
            }
        }
    }

    return analysis;
}

I would really prefer to have only 1 method rather than 5 so that maintenance of the code is easier. My fear is that in the future I will have to remember to update all 5 methods when I go to make changes. This also makes it easier to make mistakes.

I did attempt to do this using recursion but I felt like the readability of the code was negatively affected. It was harder to understand what was really going on which also worries me for when I go to change this code in the future.

Does anyone have any suggestions? I want to find the right balance of readability without repetition.

EDIT: Answer

Thanks to the help of Servy, here is what I ended up with. I just have the one public method now. Refer to his answer for info on how the LINQ is done.

public Analysis GetResults(IMDEngineState state, int[] coefficients)
{
    if (coefficients.Length < 1 || coefficients.Length > 5)
        throw new ArgumentException("Invalid number of inputs: " + coefficients.Length);

    Analysis analysis = new Analysis(coefficients);
    state.CurrentEquation = analysis.Equation;

    var inputIndices = analysis.Coefficients.Select(input => Enumerable.Range(0, state.Inputs.Length))
                                            .CartesianProduct()
                                            .Where(seq => seq.Count() == seq.Distinct().Count());

    foreach (var indices in inputIndices)
    {
        if (!ReportProgress(state, Calculate(state, analysis, indices.ToArray())))
            return null;
    }

    return analysis;
}

EDIT: Answering Phpdna's Comment

@Phpdna: Here is the output of the LINQ query (inputIndices) when I run the query with the following parameters:

analysis.Coefficients is an int[] { 2, 1, 3 }

state.Inputs is an int[] { 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 }

0,1,2       1,0,2       2,0,1       3,0,1       4,0,1       5,0,1
0,1,3       1,0,3       2,0,3       3,0,2       4,0,2       5,0,2
0,1,4       1,0,4       2,0,4       3,0,4       4,0,3       5,0,3
0,1,5       1,0,5       2,0,5       3,0,5       4,0,5       5,0,4
0,2,1       1,2,0       2,1,0       3,1,0       4,1,0       5,1,0
0,2,3       1,2,3       2,1,3       3,1,2       4,1,2       5,1,2
0,2,4       1,2,4       2,1,4       3,1,4       4,1,3       5,1,3
0,2,5       1,2,5       2,1,5       3,1,5       4,1,5       5,1,4
0,3,1       1,3,0       2,3,0       3,2,0       4,2,0       5,2,0
0,3,2       1,3,2       2,3,1       3,2,1       4,2,1       5,2,1
0,3,4       1,3,4       2,3,4       3,2,4       4,2,3       5,2,3
0,3,5       1,3,5       2,3,5       3,2,5       4,2,5       5,2,4
0,4,1       1,4,0       2,4,0       3,4,0       4,3,0       5,3,0
0,4,2       1,4,2       2,4,1       3,4,1       4,3,1       5,3,1
0,4,3       1,4,3       2,4,3       3,4,2       4,3,2       5,3,2
0,4,5       1,4,5       2,4,5       3,4,5       4,3,5       5,3,4
0,5,1       1,5,0       2,5,0       3,5,0       4,5,0       5,4,0
0,5,2       1,5,2       2,5,1       3,5,1       4,5,1       5,4,1
0,5,3       1,5,3       2,5,3       3,5,2       4,5,2       5,4,2
0,5,4       1,5,4       2,5,4       3,5,4       4,5,3       5,4,3

The query output is giving me all of the unique combination of input INDICES which I must use in my calculation knowing that I want to use three coefficients. So basically, the length of analysis.Coefficients is determining the number of elements that will be in each array of the output of the query. The actual values in analysis.Coefficients and state.Inputs does not matter (for the query - I use the values in the Calculate method so they do serve a purpose to me).

So, as a result of the query, I would now run my Calculate method using the following information by transforming that query output (indices) into meaning data to me... (I just used the first column as an example)

analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[1], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[2]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[1], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[3]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[1], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[4]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[1], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[5]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[2], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[1]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[2], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[3]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[2], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[4]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[2], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[5]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[3], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[1]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[3], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[2]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[3], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[4]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[3], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[5]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[4], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[1]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[4], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[2]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[4], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[3]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[4], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[5]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[5], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[1]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[5], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[2]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[5], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[3]
analysis.Coefficients[0]*state.Inputs[0], analysis.Coefficients[1]*state.Inputs[5], analysis.Coefficients[2]*state.Inputs[4]

Again, using that same first column, that reduces into...

2*100, 1*200, 3*300 =   200, 200, 900
2*100, 1*200, 3*400 =   200, 200, 1200
2*100, 1*200, 3*500 =   200, 200, 1500
2*100, 1*200, 3*600 =   200, 200, 1800
2*100, 1*300, 3*200 =   200, 300, 600
2*100, 1*300, 3*400 =   200, 300, 1200
2*100, 1*300, 3*500 =   200, 300, 1500
2*100, 1*300, 3*600 =   200, 300, 1800
2*100, 1*400, 3*200 =   200, 400, 600
2*100, 1*400, 3*300 =   200, 400, 900
2*100, 1*400, 3*500 =   200, 400, 1500
2*100, 1*400, 3*600 =   200, 400, 1800
2*100, 1*500, 3*200 =   200, 500, 600
2*100, 1*500, 3*300 =   200, 500, 900
2*100, 1*500, 3*400 =   200, 500, 1200
2*100, 1*500, 3*600 =   200, 500, 1800
2*100, 1*600, 3*200 =   200, 600, 600
2*100, 1*600, 3*300 =   200, 600, 900
2*100, 1*600, 3*400 =   200, 600, 1200
2*100, 1*600, 3*500 =   200, 600, 1500

And so I finally have the inputs I will use in my Calculate method.

share|improve this question
    
Thank you for sharing. Could you post the content of indices, please? –  Phpdna Aug 14 '13 at 20:57
    
@Phpdna Edited to address your comment –  Michael Mankus Aug 15 '13 at 11:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can think of your problem as the Cartesian Product of N sequences, where each sequence are the numbers from zero to one of your N specified values.

Eric Lippert has written a fantastic post explaining how to generate the Cartesian Product of N sequences using LINQ. The code he arrives at in the end is:

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CartesianProduct<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sequences)
{
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> emptyProduct = new[] { Enumerable.Empty<T>() };
    return sequences.Aggregate(
      emptyProduct,
      (accumulator, sequence) =>
        from accseq in accumulator
        from item in sequence
        select accseq.Concat(new[] { item }));
}

You'll also be able to use a helper method such as the one below to apply the constraint of only using sequences where all values are unique:

public static bool AreUnique<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence)
{
    var set = new HashSet<T>();
    foreach (var item in sequence)
        if (!set.Add(item))
            return false;
    return true;
}

Here is a query that will give you a sequence of sequences of ints, in which each sub-sequence is all of the coefficients for that particular iteration of your inner loop.

var query = coefficients.Select(coeff => Enumerable.Range(0, coeff))
        .CartesianProduct()
        .Where(sequence => sequence.AreUnique());

Note that to continue on with this refactor you'll need to edit Calculate so that it can take a sequence (or collection) of values, rather than having 1-5 parameters. You can then map each value of each sub-sequence into what it needs to be to correspond to the particular parameter to Calculate.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks fantastic. I'm having a slight issue with AreUnique though. I'm told "IEnumerable<int> does not contain a definition for 'AreUnique' accepting a first argument of type IEnumberable<int>". Any thoughts? –  Michael Mankus Aug 14 '13 at 18:56
    
Right, forgot to include that –  Servy Aug 14 '13 at 18:57
    
Interesting. I was not getting any results in my query using your AreUnique method. Changed it to return sequence.Count() == sequence.Distinct().Count(); and now things are working well. I'm going to check out the performance times and will accept this answer if it ends up being my approach. Thanks for the assistance! –  Michael Mankus Aug 14 '13 at 19:37
    
@MichaelMankus Missed a NOT, edited. –  Servy Aug 14 '13 at 19:38
    
This did exactly what I was looking for. I will post my refactored code once complete; but, for now, this is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. –  Michael Mankus Aug 14 '13 at 19:54

Could Calculate() be written so that it handles null-ish Components in a useful way? I'm thinking if you had just the five-deep loop version of GetResults(), and let the loop count for (in the single-depth case) a, b, c, and d be just 1, and submitted a null or null-like Component for A, B, C, and D, then you'd have just one GetResults() method that handled all cases. The logic that skips out when (eg) a == b would have to get a little more complicated to support this.

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