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I'm working on a system with a thread pool that will submit chained tasks. Each task will run, check its result, and then execute another task based on the outcome. This is done within the same thread, so it is not resubmitting jobs back to the thread pool. Each task will add its result to an object that wraps a Collection and offers a few other minor functions, then pass that into the next task in the chain. Once the end of the chain is reached, the result is returned in a Future.get() with a timeout and the full results can be analyzed.

Each task will be calling to an external service, ie, a SOAP request. If a task hangs, it's likely waiting and waiting for a response. In that case, if the get() times out, I catch the TimeoutException and cancel(true) the future. This means an InterruptedException is thrown in the task thread (as it's likely in a wait state) and can be caught. The exception is wrapped in a response object and placed in the Collection wrapper.

Now, it seems that I cannot get that collection back from the Future object if it times out. I'm looking at hanging on to the original task (or a wrapper for tasks) and, if the TimeoutException is caught and the Future cancelled, retrieving the Collection wrapper from the original task, which should contain the results up to the point of the timeout.

However, I don't know if this itself would be thread-safe or a race condition. If the main thread immediately tries to access the wrapped Collection after cancelling the Future object, will the wrapped exception be in there? Would it wind up in attempts at concurrent iteration and modification? Is there a way to ensure that the wrapped exception makes it into that collection before the main thread retrieves it?

Some Q&D sample code:

public class MyCallable implements Callable<MyResponseCollection> {

    private MyResponseCollection responses = new MyResponseCollection();  //Wraps a List
    private MyTask task; //This is set prior to submitting the task wrapper

    public MyResponseCollection call() throws Exception() {
        task.setCollection(responses);
        task.call(); //kicks off the task chain, not an override to Callable.call
        return responses; //If all goes well, this is passed into the Future
    }
}

public class MyTask {

    private MyResponseCollection responses;

    public void setCollection(MyResponseCollection responses){
        this.responses = responses;
    }

    public void call(){
        try{
            MyResponse m = this.doStuff();
            responses.add(m);
            this.executeNext(m); //Runs the next task based on the response, simplified here, responses object passed into the next task

        } catch (InterruptedException e){
            responses.add(new ExceptionResponse(e)); //Here's where we catch that potential interrupt
        }
     }
     public MyResponse doStuff() throws InterruptedException{
         //All work done here
     }
}

This is my first significant foray into multithreading, so I'm not quite certain how to ensure the order of operations between threads and the like or if I'm doing something silly here and there's a better solution. Does a synchronize() block on the MyResponseCollection also apply to the List within? Is it required that said List also be a Collections.synchronizedList?

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1 Answer

For having one thread indicate to another when a resource is freed, I would add a Semaphore isDone field to the resource.

public class MyResponseCollection {
    public final Semaphore isDone = new Semaphore(0);
}

public class MyCallable implements Callable<MyResponseCollection> {
    ...
    public MyResponseCollection call() throws Exception() {
        task.setCollection(responses);
        task.call(); //kicks off the task chain, not an override to Callable.call
        responses.isDone.acquire();
        return responses; //If all goes well, this is passed into the Future
    }
}


public class MyTask {
    ...

    public void call(){
        try{

        } finally {
            responses.isDone.release();
        }
     }
 }

responses.isDone.acquire() will block until a permit becomes available, with isDone initialized with zero permits. MyTask#call() adds a permit in its finally block, which wakes up MyCallable.

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Excellent! That's just what I needed! I've modified your result a tad, though, and surrounded the task.call() in MyCallable with .acquire() and .release(). As multiple tasks could be chained within that single call, it's best to keep the lock there as it will reach that .release() either by successful completion or by the caught exception coming back. The finally block in each MyTask seems a bit flaky in releasing it so the main thread can process the results. –  user1017413 Aug 14 '13 at 19:45
    
@user1017413 Do you have anything else in the finally block? if an exception is being thrown within the block before the call to release then you'll see some flakiness - if this is the case then move the release call to the top of the block. –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Aug 14 '13 at 19:52
    
Nope, just the release, nothing else. –  user1017413 Aug 14 '13 at 23:18
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