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Could anybody help on a regular expression that I can use to validate if a string contains both digit and non-digit characters?

I'm using "\d+\D+" but it's not working. The test cases I have are:

a1
1a
a1b
1ab
ab1
1-2
12-
-12

The test cases I listed should all result in match. I'm using javascript RegExp.test() So 999 or asdf or _+sdf would not match.

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What regex engine/environment if any are you using? What should be the outcome on each of those test cases? And what command (if applicable) are you calling the regex with? –  Jerry Aug 14 '13 at 17:57
4  
Please provide examples of valid and INVALID strings. Otherwhise no one could know the difference between them. –  dognose Aug 14 '13 at 17:59
    
Simple. If: ^(?=\D*\d)(?=\d*\D) matches, you're good. –  ridgerunner Aug 14 '13 at 22:20
    
The test cases I listed should all result in match. I'm using javascript RegExp.test() So 999 or asdf or _+sdf would not match. Thanks all! –  user2683524 Aug 18 '13 at 5:02

4 Answers 4

Your current regex only matches strings of one or more digits, followed by one or more non-digits. You could use a look-ahead to check for the existence of a digit:

"(?=.*\d).*\D.*"

The (?=.*\d) part means "somewhere after this, there must be zero or more of any character followed by a digit." This allows your digit to appear anywhere in the string.

The .*\D.* part means "match zero or more of any character, then a non-digit, then zero or more of any character," which will match a non-digit at any position in the string and the rest of the characters (digits or not) around it.

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1  
You sir, musst be a magician to tell from a1 1a a1b 1ab ab1 1-2 12- -12 which pattern is required... There is no Validation, without KNOWING what is INvalid. will 1a 1a a1b 1ab ab1 1-2 12- -12 be valid? –  dognose Aug 14 '13 at 18:02
1  
@dognose "validate if a string contains both digit and non-digit characters" –  arshajii Aug 14 '13 at 18:02
    
After reformating the list, ist clearer. Thought that should go into ONE pattern. –  dognose Aug 14 '13 at 18:03
    
@arshajii -- that's still not clear. What if there are symbols present, like the hyphen. Is that still valid? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Aug 14 '13 at 18:03
1  
@Roddy A hyphen is a non-digit. I'm not sure how that's not clear. –  Michelle Aug 14 '13 at 18:05

You can try using lookaheads:

.*(?=.*\d)(?=.*\D).*

But maybe you don't even need a regex? Depending on the language/tool you're using, you might be able to do something like this:

  • Let your input string be s. If s is empty, it is invalid.
  • If the first character of s is a digit:
    • Loop through the other characters of s until you find a non-digit. If you don't find a non-digit, s is invalid.
  • Otherwise:
    • Loop through the other characters of s until you find a digit. If you don't find a digit, s is invalid.
  • If you found the appropriate digit/non-digit, s is valid.
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This here works for me. It's ( match1 | match2 ) where | means OR.

(\d+[a-zA-Z]+|[a-zA-Z]+\d+)
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1  
There's no restriction stating that no symbols or uppercase letters are allowed. –  Michelle Aug 14 '13 at 18:09
    
will also fail for a1b. –  dognose Aug 14 '13 at 18:10
    
For "a1b" it matches "a1" so it can be used to validate –  576i Aug 14 '13 at 18:12
    
@dognose It won't match the whole string, but it's not restricted to the start & end. It would match the a1 part and succeed (it's only being used for validation, anyway). –  Michelle Aug 14 '13 at 18:12
1  
Thanks. "(\d+\D+|\D+\d+)" is better for me. –  user2683524 Aug 18 '13 at 5:06

By digit and non-digit if you mean (any non-digit character) you can use the character classes \d for digit and \D which means [^\d]. There is no need for a lookaround here though. If you mean a number and a letter, you can use the following. I'm exploding your string for comparison strings. I'm using a group with an | operator to allow for digit before letter and vice versa.

<?php

$string = 'a1 1a a1b 1ab ab1 1-2 12- -12';
$strings = explode(' ',$string);

$pattern = '!([0-9][A-Za-z]|[A-Za-z][0-9])!';

foreach($strings as $tempString){
   if(preg_match($pattern,$tempString)){
      echo "$tempString matches\n";   
   } else {
      echo "$tempString doesn't match\n";      
   }
}


?>

Output

a1 matches
1a matches
a1b matches
1ab matches
ab1 matches
1-2 doesn't match
12- doesn't match
-12 doesn't match

If we change to the \d\D character classes everything matches.

$pattern = '!(\d\D|\D\d)!';

Output

a1 matches
1a matches
a1b matches
1ab matches
ab1 matches
1-2 matches
12- matches
-12 matches
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