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Just came across this article about NOSQL patterns (not mine). It's covers lots of NOSQL implementation patterns, from a developers point of view (like hashing and replication patterns).

All in all it's very useful in case anyone is asking themselves about the question:

Where can I find information about NOSQL implementation patterns?

So added a question here, please feel free to add more answers!

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Isn't NOSQL a fancy way of saying that you are using either a flat file or a hashed table implemented maybe with a binary tree or any other type of classic data structures? The concept of NOSQL is just: you don't need the functionality that comes with SQL (sumarization, selection, ordering, stored procedures, locking, etc.), so you can go without the overhead. You just use an old fashioned data structure that is optimized for your domain: insert speed, read speed, concurrency, etc. If I'm not mistaken, you could call Python's Pickle NOSQL. –  voyager Dec 1 '09 at 4:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A great article about NOSQL patterns is found here:

http://horicky.blogspot.com/2009/11/nosql-patterns.html

covers

  • API model

  • Machines layout

  • Data partitioning (Consistent Hashing)

  • Data replication

  • Membership Changes

  • Client Consistency

  • Master Slave (or Single Master) Model

  • Multi-Master (or No Master) Model

  • Quorum Based 2PC

  • Vector Clock

  • State Transfer Model

  • Operation Transfer Model

  • Map Reduce Execution

  • Handling Deletes

  • Storage Implementation

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we are forming some here as well.

https://github.com/deanhiller/playorm/wiki/Patterns-Page

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