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Suppose, I am at the origin of a 2D plane. I want to reach point(x,y) by making exactly N steps.

If I am currently at point (p,q) then, I can go to points (p+1,q), (p,q+1), (p-1,q), (p,q-1) after one step.

How many different routes can I use to do that? Note that : N will be at most 10 million .

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1  
Are there any other restrictions? Can only visit a point once? Have to stay in the positive quadrant? –  jxh Aug 14 '13 at 20:28
    
No, no other constrains. Can visit one point more than one time and all 4 quadrants are accessible. –  Bidhan Roy Aug 14 '13 at 22:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

New answer here: After analysis of the calculated tables - it is possible to find number of paths with some combinatorics.

Delphi code (note that long arithmetics should be used for big numbers beyond Int64 range):

function PathCount(x, y, N: Integer): Int64;
var
  t, Diff: Integer;
begin
  x := Abs(x); //exploit symmetry
  y := Abs(y);

  if y > x then begin  //Swap them for simplicity, exploit symmetry again
    t := x;
    x := y;
    y := t;
  end;

  Diff := N - (x + y);
  if (Diff < 0) or Odd(Diff) then
    Exit(0);  //return 0 for unavailable points

  Diff := Diff div 2;
  Result := CombinationCount(N, x + Diff) * CombinationCount(N, Diff);
end;


function CombinationCount(n, k: Integer): Int64;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  Result := 1;
  if k > n - k then
    k := n - k;
  for i := 1 to k do
    Result := (Result * (n - i + 1)) div i;
end;

Old answer (for demonstration)

For reasonable N it is possible to use dynamic programming. Make 3d-array with limits (-N/2..N/2),(-N/2..N/2),(0..N). Remember that its size is N^3 (10^21 for 10 million points, impractical). You can exploit symmetry, but reducing factor is small constant only (2 or 4).

Recursive formula:

P(p, q, K) = P(p-1, q, K-1) + P(p+1, q, K-1) + P(p, q-1, K-1) + P(p, q+1, K-1)

Fill array layer by layer: at the first step make P(x-1,y0,1) = 1 (and 3 points more) and so on... Neighbourhood of the inital point after 0, 1 and 2 steps:

                  0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0    0 1 0   0 2 0 2 0
0 1 0    1 0 1   1 0 4 0 1
0 0 0    0 1 0   0 2 0 2 0
                  0 0 1 0 0 

6 steps animated:

enter image description here

After the finish, P(0, 0, N) will contain number of paths.

P.S. Probably, there is some combinatorial formula. For example, we can see binomial coefficients C(N,K) in the last diagonals (1 2 1, 1 3 3 1, 1 4 6 4 1 ...), next non-zero diagonal contains N * C(N,K) an so on.

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Even if I exploit symmetry, the memory complexity will still be huge, isn't it? –  Bidhan Roy Aug 15 '13 at 9:15
    
Yes, it is..... –  MBo Aug 15 '13 at 11:41
    
See new additions –  MBo Aug 15 '13 at 12:40
    
Something is off with the new addition. x=y=0 returns 0 or 1. –  Teepeemm Aug 15 '13 at 14:52
    
@Teepeemm x=y=0 returns 0 for odd N steps and non-zero value for even N –  MBo Aug 15 '13 at 15:21

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