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Given a sorted list of numbers, I would like to find the longest subsequence where the differences between successive elements are geometrically increasing. So if the list is

 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 15, 27, 30, 31, 81

then the subsequence is 1, 3, 7, 15, 31. Alternatively consider 1, 2, 5, 6, 11, 15, 23, 41, 47 which has subsequence 5, 11, 23, 47 with a = 3 and k = 2.

Can this be solved in O(n2) time? Where n is the length of the list.

I am interested both in the general case where the progression of differences is ak, ak2, ak3, etc., where both a and k are integers, and in the special case where a = 1, so the progression of difference is k, k2, k3, etc.

share|improve this question
3  
@Fallen, why not post it as an answer? Your algorithm will be interesting in its own right, without compromising the OP's question. And it may invite better solutions. –  Mihai Danila Aug 14 '13 at 21:35
1  
@Jacob i think i understand, thanks for your comment. –  גלעד ברקן Aug 15 '13 at 0:47
3  
@Jacob's question is key here, I think. I believe there is an n^2 algorithm if the progression of differences must look like (k, k^2, k^3...), but that there is a lower bound of n^3 if it may look like (a*k, a*k^2, a*k^3). The example is of the first form, so it's not clear. –  Aaron Dufour Aug 15 '13 at 0:54
1  
I suggest adding " The common ratio should be an integer. " to the description of the problem. Also, from Wikipedia, a geometric progression is defined ar^0, ar^1, ar^2, .... Is a always 1 in your case, or can it be an arbitrary real number, or integer? –  darksky Aug 15 '13 at 5:27
1  
@AaronDufour. I am interested in both cases. Thank you pointing out the difference between them. –  user2171391 Aug 15 '13 at 6:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Update

I have made an improvement of the algorithm that it takes an average of O(M + N^2) and memory needs of O(M+N). Mainly is the same that the protocol described below, but to calculate the possible factors A,K for ech diference D, I preload a table. This table takes less than a second to be constructed for M=10^7.

I have made a C implementation that takes less than 10minutes to solve N=10^5 diferent random integer elements.

Here is the source code in C: To execute just do: gcc -O3 -o findgeo findgeo.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <memory.h>
#include <time.h>

struct Factor {
    int a;
    int k;
    struct Factor *next;
};

struct Factor *factors = 0;
int factorsL=0;

void ConstructFactors(int R) {
    int a,k,C;
    int R2;
    struct Factor *f;
    float seconds;
    clock_t end;
    clock_t start = clock();

    if (factors) free(factors);
    factors = malloc (sizeof(struct Factor) *((R>>1) + 1));
    R2 = R>>1 ;
    for (a=0;a<=R2;a++) {
        factors[a].a= a;
        factors[a].k=1;
        factors[a].next=NULL;
    }
    factorsL=R2+1;
    R2 = floor(sqrt(R));
    for (k=2; k<=R2; k++) {
        a=1;
        C=a*k*(k+1);
        while (C<R) {
            C >>= 1;
            f=malloc(sizeof(struct Factor));
            *f=factors[C];
            factors[C].a=a;
            factors[C].k=k;
            factors[C].next=f;
            a++;
            C=a*k*(k+1);
        }
    }

    end = clock();
    seconds = (float)(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    printf("Construct Table: %f\n",seconds);
}

void DestructFactors() {
    int i;
    struct Factor *f;
    for (i=0;i<factorsL;i++) {
        while (factors[i].next) {
            f=factors[i].next->next;
            free(factors[i].next);
            factors[i].next=f;
        }
    }
    free(factors);
    factors=NULL;
    factorsL=0;
}

int ipow(int base, int exp)
{
    int result = 1;
    while (exp)
    {
        if (exp & 1)
            result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }

    return result;
}

void findGeo(int **bestSolution, int *bestSolutionL,int *Arr, int L) {
    int i,j,D;
    int mustExistToBeBetter;
    int R=Arr[L-1]-Arr[0];
    int *possibleSolution;
    int possibleSolutionL=0;
    int exp;
    int NextVal;
    int idx;
    int kMax,aMax;
    float seconds;
    clock_t end;
    clock_t start = clock();


    kMax = floor(sqrt(R));
    aMax = floor(R/2);
    ConstructFactors(R);
    *bestSolutionL=2;
    *bestSolution=malloc(0);

    possibleSolution = malloc(sizeof(int)*(R+1));

    struct Factor *f;
    int *H=malloc(sizeof(int)*(R+1));
    memset(H,0, sizeof(int)*(R+1));
    for (i=0;i<L;i++) {
        H[ Arr[i]-Arr[0] ]=1;
    }
    for (i=0; i<L-2;i++) {
        for (j=i+2; j<L; j++) {
            D=Arr[j]-Arr[i];
            if (D & 1) continue;
            f = factors + (D >>1);
            while (f) {
                idx=Arr[i] + f->a * f->k  - Arr[0];
                if ((f->k <= kMax)&& (f->a<aMax)&&(idx<=R)&&H[idx]) {
                    if (f->k ==1) {
                        mustExistToBeBetter = Arr[i] + f->a * (*bestSolutionL);
                    } else {
                        mustExistToBeBetter = Arr[i] + f->a * f->k * (ipow(f->k,*bestSolutionL) - 1)/(f->k-1);
                    }
                    if (mustExistToBeBetter< Arr[L-1]+1) {
                        idx=  floor(mustExistToBeBetter - Arr[0]);
                    } else {
                        idx = R+1;
                    }
                    if ((idx<=R)&&H[idx]) {
                        possibleSolution[0]=Arr[i];
                        possibleSolution[1]=Arr[i] + f->a*f->k;
                        possibleSolution[2]=Arr[j];
                        possibleSolutionL=3;
                        exp = f->k * f->k * f->k;
                        NextVal = Arr[j] + f->a * exp;
                        idx=NextVal - Arr[0];
                        while ( (idx<=R) && H[idx]) {
                            possibleSolution[possibleSolutionL]=NextVal;
                            possibleSolutionL++;
                            exp = exp * f->k;
                            NextVal = NextVal + f->a * exp;
                            idx=NextVal - Arr[0];
                        }

                        if (possibleSolutionL > *bestSolutionL) {
                            free(*bestSolution);
                            *bestSolution = possibleSolution;
                            possibleSolution = malloc(sizeof(int)*(R+1));
                            *bestSolutionL=possibleSolutionL;
                            kMax= floor( pow (R, 1/ (*bestSolutionL) ));
                            aMax= floor(R /  (*bestSolutionL));
                        }
                    }
                }
                f=f->next;
            }
        }
    }

    if (*bestSolutionL == 2) {
        free(*bestSolution);
        possibleSolutionL=0;
        for (i=0; (i<2)&&(i<L); i++ ) {
            possibleSolution[possibleSolutionL]=Arr[i];
            possibleSolutionL++;
        }
        *bestSolution = possibleSolution;
        *bestSolutionL=possibleSolutionL;
    } else {
        free(possibleSolution);
    }
    DestructFactors();
    free(H);

    end = clock();
    seconds = (float)(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    printf("findGeo: %f\n",seconds);
}

int compareInt (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    return *(int *)a - *(int *)b;
}

int main(void) {
    int N=100000;
    int R=10000000;
    int *A = malloc(sizeof(int)*N);
    int *Sol;
    int SolL;
    int i;


    int *S=malloc(sizeof(int)*R);
    for (i=0;i<R;i++) S[i]=i+1;

    for (i=0;i<N;i++) {
        int r = rand() % (R-i);
        A[i]=S[r];
        S[r]=S[R-i-1];
    }

    free(S);
    qsort(A,N,sizeof(int),compareInt);

/*
    int step = floor(R/N);
    A[0]=1;
    for (i=1;i<N;i++) {
        A[i]=A[i-1]+step;
    }
*/

    findGeo(&Sol,&SolL,A,N);

    printf("[");
    for (i=0;i<SolL;i++) {
        if (i>0) printf(",");
        printf("%d",Sol[i]);
    }
    printf("]\n");
    printf("Size: %d\n",SolL);

    free(Sol);
    free(A);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Demostration

I will try to demonstrate that the algorithm that I proposed is O(N`2+M) in average for an equally distributed random sequence. I’m not a mathematician and I am not used to do this kind of demonstrations, so please fill free to correct me any error that you can see.

There are 4 indented loops, the two firsts are the N^2 factor. The M is for the calculation of the possible factors table).

The third loop is executed only once in average for each pair. You can see this checking the size of the pre-calculated factors table. It’s size is M when N->inf. So the average steps for each pair is M/M=1.

So the proof happens to check that the forth loop. (The one that traverses the good made sequences is executed less that or equal O(N^2) for all the pairs.

To demonstrate that, I will consider two cases: one where M>>N and other where M ~= N. Where M is the maximum difference of the initial array: M= S(n)-S(1).

For the first case, (M>>N) the probability to find a coincidence is p=N/M. To start a sequence, it must coincide the second and the b+1 element where b is the length of the best sequence until now. So the loop will enter N^2*(N/M)^2 times. And the average length of this series (supposing an infinite series) is p/(1-p) = N/(M-N). So the total number of times that the loop will be executed is N^2 * (N/M)^2 * N/(M-N). And this is close to 0 when M>>N. The problem here is when M~=N.

Now lets consider this case where M~=N. Lets consider that b is the best sequence length until now. For the case A=k=1, then the sequence must start before N-b, so the number of sequences will be N-b, and the times that will go for the loop will be a maximum of (N-b)*b.

For A>1 and k=1 we can extrapolate to (N-A*b/d)*b where d is M/N (the average distance between numbers). If we add for all A’s from 1 to dN/b then we see a top limit of:

\sum_{A=1}^{dN/b}\left ( N-\frac{Ab}{d} \right )b=\frac{N^2d}{2}

For the cases where k>=2, we see that the sequence must start before N-A*k^b/d, So the loop will enter an average of A*k^b/d)*b and adding for all As from 1 to dN/k^b, it gives a limit of

\sum_{A=1}^{dN/k^b}\left ( N-\frac{Ak^b}{d} \right )b=\frac{bN^2d}{2k^b}

Here, the worst case is when b is minimum. Because we are considering minimum series, lets consider a very worst case of b= 2 so the number of passes for the 4th loop for a given k will be less than

\frac{dN^2}{k^2} .

And if we add all k’s from 2 to infinite will be:

\sum_{k=2}^{\infty } \frac{dN^2}{k^2} = dN^2 \left ( \frac{\pi ^2}{6}  -1\right )

So adding all the passes for k=1 and k>=2, we have a maximum of:

\frac{N^2d}{2} +N^2d \left ( \frac{\pi ^2}{6}  -1\right ) = N^2d\left ( \frac{\pi ^2}{6} - \frac{1}{2}\right ) \simeq 1.45N^2d

Note that d=M/N=1/p.

So we have two limits, One that goes to infinite when d=1/p=M/N goes to 1 and other that goes to infinite when d goes to infinite. So our limit is the minimum of both, and the worst case is when both equetions cross. So if we solve the equation:

 N^2d\left ( \frac{\pi ^2}{6} - \frac{1}{2}\right ) = N^2\left ( \frac{N}{M} \right )^2\frac{N}{M-N} =N^2\left ( \frac{1}{d} \right )^2\frac{1}{d-1}

we see that the maximum is when d=1.353

So it is demonstrated that the forth loops will be processed less than 1.55N^2 times in total.

Of course, this is for the average case. For the worst case I am not able to find a way to generate series whose forth loop are higher than O(N^2), and I strongly believe that they does not exist, but I am not a mathematician to prove it.

Old Answer

Here is a solution in average of O((n^2)*cube_root(M)) where M is the difference between the first and last element of the array. And memory requirements of O(M+N).

1.- Construct an array H of length M so that M[i - S[0]]=true if i exists in the initial array and false if it does not exist.

2.- For each pair in the array S[j], S[i] do:

2.1 Check if it can be the first and third elements of a possible solution. To do so, calculate all possible A,K pairs that meet the equation S(i) = S(j) + AK + AK^2. Check this SO question to see how to solve this problem. And check that exist the second element: S[i]+ A*K

2.2 Check also that exist the element one position further that the best solution that we have. For example, if the best solution that we have until now is 4 elements long then check that exist the element A[j] + A*K + A*K^2 + A*K^3 + A*K^4

2.3 If 2.1 and 2.2 are true, then iterate how long is this series and set as the bestSolution until now is is longer that the last.

Here is the code in javascript:

function getAKs(A) {
    if (A / 2 != Math.floor(A / 2)) return [];
    var solution = [];
    var i;
    var SR3 = Math.pow(A, 1 / 3);
    for (i = 1; i <= SR3; i++) {
        var B, C;
        C = i;
        B = A / (C * (C + 1));
        if (B == Math.floor(B)) {
            solution.push([B, C]);
        }

        B = i;
        C = (-1 + Math.sqrt(1 + 4 * A / B)) / 2;
        if (C == Math.floor(C)) {
            solution.push([B, C]);
        }
    }

    return solution;
}

function getBestGeometricSequence(S) {
    var i, j, k;

    var bestSolution = [];

    var H = Array(S[S.length-1]-S[0]);
    for (i = 0; i < S.length; i++) H[S[i] - S[0]] = true;

    for (i = 0; i < S.length; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            var PossibleAKs = getAKs(S[i] - S[j]);
            for (k = 0; k < PossibleAKs.length; k++) {
                var A = PossibleAKs[k][0];
                var K = PossibleAKs[k][17];

                var mustExistToBeBetter;
                if (K==1) {
                    mustExistToBeBetter = S[j] + A * bestSolution.length;
                } else {
                    mustExistToBeBetter = S[j] + A * K * (Math.pow(K,bestSolution.length) - 1)/(K-1);
                }

                if ((H[S[j] + A * K - S[0]]) && (H[mustExistToBeBetter - S[0]])) {
                    var possibleSolution=[S[j],S[j] + A * K,S[i]];
                    exp = K * K * K;
                    var NextVal = S[i] + A * exp;
                    while (H[NextVal - S[0]] === true) {
                        possibleSolution.push(NextVal);
                        exp = exp * K;
                        NextVal = NextVal + A * exp;
                    }

                    if (possibleSolution.length > bestSolution.length) {
                        bestSolution = possibleSolution;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return bestSolution;
}

//var A= [ 1, 2, 3,5,7, 15, 27, 30,31, 81];
var A=[];
for (i=1;i<=3000;i++) {
    A.push(i);
}
var sol=getBestGeometricSequence(A);

$("#result").html(JSON.stringify(sol));

You can check the code here: http://jsfiddle.net/6yHyR/1/

I maintain the other solution because I believe that it is still better when M is very big compared to N.

share|improve this answer
1  
while (H[NextVal] === true) { ... } this is not constant time. In the worst case 1, 2, 3, ..., N and k = 1 , it's O(N). In your function getAKs the worse case for A^(1/3) is R^(1/3) where R is the range last element minus first. Overall time complexity is O(N * N * R^(1/3) * N) = O(N^3 * R^(1/3) ) –  darksky Aug 18 '13 at 8:53
    
H[NextVal] is in average O(1). Any way, it is a simple search. Use the search algorithm that you want ;) –  jbaylina Aug 18 '13 at 10:06
    
I changed the definition of R in the answer. Depending of the array, you can substitute the R^(1/3) by precalculating a table with a cost O(R^(4/3)) and size O(N^2). So the algorithm would be O(R^(4/3)+N^2) in average. Or if bsearch is used: O(R^(4/3)+N^2*log(N)) as a maximum. –  jbaylina Aug 18 '13 at 11:54
1  
@jbaylina: It's not the hash lookup that I'm concerned about, it's the innermost extension loop -- the one starting with while ( (idx<=R) && H[idx]) { in your C version. –  j_random_hacker Aug 22 '13 at 10:22
2  
@j_random_hacker With this serie, it is executed only N times becouse when i>2, the BestSolution=N and it does not enter the loop. –  jbaylina Aug 22 '13 at 18:09

Just to start with something, here is a simple solution in JavaScript:

var input = [0.7, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 15, 27, 30, 31, 81], 
    output = [], indexes, values, i, index, value, i_max_length,
    i1, i2, i3, j1, j2, j3, difference12a, difference23a, difference12b, difference23b,
    scale_factor, common_ratio_a, common_ratio_b, common_ratio_c,
    error, EPSILON = 1e-9, common_ratio_is_integer,
    resultDiv = $("#result");

for (i1 = 0; i1 < input.length - 2; ++i1) {
    for (i2 = i1 + 1; i2 < input.length - 1; ++i2) {
        scale_factor = difference12a = input[i2] - input[i1];
        for (i3 = i2 + 1; i3 < input.length; ++i3) {
            difference23a = input[i3] - input[i2];
            common_ratio_1a = difference23a / difference12a;
            common_ratio_2a = Math.round(common_ratio_1a);
            error = Math.abs((common_ratio_2a - common_ratio_1a) / common_ratio_1a);
            common_ratio_is_integer = error < EPSILON;
            if (common_ratio_2a > 1 && common_ratio_is_integer) {
                indexes = [i1, i2, i3];
                j1 = i2;
                j2 = i3
                difference12b = difference23a;
                for (j3 = j2 + 1; j3 < input.length; ++j3) {
                    difference23b = input[j3] - input[j2];
                    common_ratio_1b = difference23b / difference12b;
                    common_ratio_2b = Math.round(common_ratio_1b);
                    error = Math.abs((common_ratio_2b - common_ratio_1b) / common_ratio_1b);
                    common_ratio_is_integer = error < EPSILON;
                    if (common_ratio_is_integer && common_ratio_2a === common_ratio_2b) {
                        indexes.push(j3);
                        j1 = j2;
                        j2 = j3
                        difference12b = difference23b;
                    }
                }
                values = [];
                for (i = 0; i < indexes.length; ++i) {
                    index = indexes[i];
                    value = input[index];
                    values.push(value);
                }
                output.push(values);
            }
        }
    }
}
if (output !== []) {
    i_max_length = 0;
    for (i = 1; i < output.length; ++i) {
        if (output[i_max_length].length < output[i].length)
            i_max_length = i;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < output.length; ++i) {
        if (output[i_max_length].length == output[i].length)
            resultDiv.append("<p>[" + output[i] + "]</p>");
    }
}

Output:

[1, 3, 7, 15, 31]

I find the first three items of every subsequence candidate, calculate the scale factor and the common ratio from them, and if the common ratio is integer, then I iterate over the remaining elements after the third one, and add those to the subsequence, which fit into the geometric progression defined by the first three items. As a last step, I select the sebsequence/s which has/have the largest length.

share|improve this answer
    
Your analysis seems to be off. What happens when you give it an input of consecutive integers like [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ... , 100]? –  arghbleargh Aug 15 '13 at 0:06
1  
Sorry, I meant your O(N^3) complexity analysis. If you allow a common_ratio of 1, it takes O(N^4) for my test case. If you require common_ratio > 1, then it takes O(N^3 log N). –  arghbleargh Aug 15 '13 at 0:14
    
@arghbleargh You are right, my analysis was wrong. I deleted my speed estimate from the answer. –  kol Aug 15 '13 at 1:14

Here is my solution in Javascript. It should be close to O(n^2) except may be in some pathological cases.

function bsearch(Arr,Val, left,right) {
    if (left == right) return left;
    var m=Math.floor((left + right) /2);
    if (Val <= Arr[m]) {
        return bsearch(Arr,Val,left,m);
    } else {
        return bsearch(Arr,Val,m+1,right);
    }
}

function findLongestGeometricSequence(S) {
    var bestSolution=[];

    var i,j,k;
    var H={};
    for (i=0;i<S.length;i++) H[S[i]]=true;

    for (i=0;i<S.length;i++) {
        for (j=0;j<i;j++) {
            for (k=j+1;k<i;) {
                var possibleSolution=[S[j],S[k],S[i]];

                var K = (S[i] - S[k]) / (S[k] - S[j]);
                var A = (S[k] - S[j]) * (S[k] - S[j]) / (S[i] - S[k]); 

                if ((Math.floor(K) == K) && (Math.floor(A)==A)) {
                    exp= K*K*K;
                    var NextVal= S[i] + A * exp;
                    while (H[NextVal] === true) {
                        possibleSolution.push(NextVal);
                        exp = exp * K;
                        NextVal= NextVal + A * exp;                
                    }

                    if (possibleSolution.length > bestSolution.length)
                        bestSolution=possibleSolution;

                    K--;
                } else {
                    K=Math.floor(K);
                }

                if (K>0) {
                    var NextPossibleMidValue= (S[i] + K*S[j]) / (K +1); 
                    k++;
                    if (S[k]<NextPossibleMidValue) {
                        k=bsearch(S,NextPossibleMidValue, k+1, i);
                    }
                } else {
                    k=i;
                }
            }        
        }
    }
    return bestSolution;
}


function Run() {
    var MyS= [0.7, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,6,7, 15, 27, 30,31, 81];

    var sol = findLongestGeometricSequence(MyS); 

    alert(JSON.stringify(sol));
}

Small Explanation

If we take 3 numbers of the array S(j) < S(k) < S(i) then you can calculate a and k so that: S(k) = S(j) + a*k and S(i) = S(k) + a*k^2 (2 equations and 2 incognits). With that in mind, you can check if exist a number in the array that is S(next) = S(i) + a*k^3. If that is the case, then continue checknng for S(next2) = S(next) + a*k^4 and so on.

This would be a O(n^3) solution, but you can hava advantage that k must be integer in order to limit the S(k) points selected.

In case that a is known, then you can calculate a(k) and you need to check only one number in the third loop, so this case will be clearly a O(n^2).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] when I run this code. That is an invalid result. –  darksky Aug 15 '13 at 13:18
    
2 = 1 + 1*1; 3 = 2 + 1*1^2; 4 = 3 + 1*1^3; Do you accept k=1? In the algo I accept any value for a (not only integer) It can be changed easyly. –  jbaylina Aug 15 '13 at 13:21
    
Hah. Not sure if k=1 is called geometric. I think OP is referring to k >= 2. –  darksky Aug 15 '13 at 13:26
    
To accept only k>1 and integer a change the if (Math.floor(K) == K) with this condition: if ((Math.floor(K) == K)&&(Math.floor(A) ==A)&&(K>1)) –  jbaylina Aug 15 '13 at 13:29
    
If a=1 then S(k) can be calculated and then it is clearly a O(n^2) algorithm. –  jbaylina Aug 15 '13 at 15:45

I think this task is related with not so long ago posted Longest equally-spaced subsequence. I've just modified my algorithm in Python a little bit:

from math import sqrt

def add_precalc(precalc, end, (a, k), count, res, N):
    if end + a * k ** res[1]["count"] > N: return

    x = end + a * k ** count
    if x > N or x < 0: return

    if precalc[x] is None: return

    if (a, k) not in precalc[x]:
        precalc[x][(a, k)] = count

    return

def factors(n):
    res = []
    for x in range(1, int(sqrt(n)) + 1):
        if n % x == 0:
            y = n / x
            res.append((x, y))
            res.append((y, x))
    return res

def work(input):
    precalc = [None] * (max(input) + 1)
    for x in input: precalc[x] = {}

    N = max(input)

    res = ((0, 0), {"end":0, "count":0})
    for i, x in enumerate(input):
        for y in input[i::-1]:
            for a, k in factors(x - y):
                if (a, k) in precalc[x]: continue
                add_precalc(precalc, x, (a, k), 2, res, N)

        for step, count in precalc[x].iteritems():
            count += 1
            if count > res[1]["count"]: res = (step, {"end":x, "count":count})
            add_precalc(precalc, x, step, count, res, N)
        precalc[x] = None

    d = [res[1]["end"]]
    for x in range(res[1]["count"] - 1, 0, -1):
        d.append(d[-1] - res[0][0] * res[0][1] ** x)
    d.reverse()
    return d

explanation

  • Traversing the array
  • For each previous element of the array calculate factors of the difference between current and taken previous element and then precalculate next possible element of the sequence and saving it to precalc array
  • So when arriving at element i there're already all possible sequences with element i in the precalc array, so we have to calculate next possible element and save it to precalc.

Currently there's one place in algorithm that could be slow - factorization of each previous number. I think it could be made faster with two optimizations:

  • more effective factorization algorithm
  • find a way not to see at each element of array, using the fact that array is sorted and there's already a precalculated sequences
share|improve this answer
    
Does this only work when a=1? Could you add some explanation of the method as well please as code alone is hard to interpret. –  user2171391 Aug 16 '13 at 20:53
    
Yes, sorry, had no time to add axplanation. It does work only for a = 1 (I haven't realized that there should be a * k^n and not k^n), so I would modify it later (it's night here already) and will add some explanation –  Roman Pekar Aug 16 '13 at 21:01
    
Looks likes line 3 is redundant. How big is precalc[x]? This looks to be O(N* sizeof(precalc)^2), good algorithm though. –  Guvante Aug 17 '13 at 18:46
    
thanks, I have to consider possible size of precalc[x]. It could be made a dictionary instead of array, I have to check which is faster in python. Had absolutely no time today to modify algorithm :( –  Roman Pekar Aug 17 '13 at 18:49
1  
A brief human readable paragraph describing what this algorithm is doing would be useful, especially for those who may not be as familiar with Python as you. –  darksky Aug 18 '13 at 9:02

Python:

def subseq(a):
    seq = []
    aset = set(a)
    for i, x in enumerate(a):
        # elements after x
        for j, x2 in enumerate(a[i+1:]):
            j += i + 1  # enumerate starts j at 0, we want a[j] = x2
            bk = x2 - x  # b*k (assuming k and k's exponent start at 1)

            # given b*k, bruteforce values of k
            for k in range(1, bk + 1):
                items = [x, x2]  # our subsequence so far
                nextdist = bk * k # what x3 - x2 should look like

                while items[-1] + nextdist in aset:
                    items.append(items[-1] + nextdist)
                    nextdist *= k

                if len(items) > len(seq):
                    seq = items

    return seq

Running time is O(dn^3), where d is the (average?) distance between two elements, and n is of course len(a).

share|improve this answer
    
Would you mind explaining this a bit? –  user2171391 Aug 17 '13 at 17:55
    
Sure, here you go. –  Markus Unterwaditzer Aug 17 '13 at 18:05
    
Thank you. Is this O(n^4)? –  user2171391 Aug 17 '13 at 18:11
    
I have no idea. Only the first for-loop has n interations (O(n)), the iterations of the second one decrement by 1 every iteration of the first (O(log n)?), the third one is... dunno and the fourth behaves similar to the second. –  Markus Unterwaditzer Aug 17 '13 at 18:14

In fact it is exactly the same question as Longest equally-spaced subsequence, you just have to consider the logarithm of your data. If the sequence is a, ak, ak^2, ak^3, the logarithmique value is ln(a), ln(a) + ln(k), ln(a)+2ln(k), ln(a)+3ln(k), so it is equally spaced. The opposite is of course true. There is a lot of different code in the question above.

I don't think the special case a=1 can be resolved more efficiently than an adaptation from an algorithm above.

share|improve this answer
5  
As far as I understand, OP wants to find longest sequence which looks like like start, start + a * k, start + a * k^2, start + a * k^3. Could you clarify how do you find it with your logarithmic approach? You could use sequence 1, 2, 5, 6, 11, 15, 23, 41, 47 as example –  Roman Pekar Aug 20 '13 at 10:56
2  
Do you take the log of each number of the array (N numbers) or take the log of the differences: (N^2/2-N). Converting a geometrical to lineal, seems a good idea, but I can't realy see how the algorithm would work. Please, explain the example. –  jbaylina Aug 20 '13 at 13:25
2  
@RomanPekar It's more like start, start + ak, start + ak + ak^2, start + ak + ak^2 + ak^3, ... –  darksky Aug 21 '13 at 18:40
    
It would be equivalent for a serie of the kind, start , startk , startk^2,start*k^3. But that's not the definition of the problem. For me this answer is a -1 unless some convincing explanation that I can't see is given. –  jbaylina Aug 23 '13 at 12:52
2  
I think this solution is wrong sadly. –  phoenix Aug 23 '13 at 21:18

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