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I am having an issue with a Java program throwing a stack overflow error, and I determined that the issue had to do with two class files references one another. For example, in class one, there is a line two two = new two();, and in class two, there is a line one one = new one();. I need these classes to be able to share methods, and this is the only way that I can do what I want to do. How can I get the two classes to reference each other without recursion causing stack overflow issues?

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closed as off-topic by Eric, Beryllium, Dennis Meng, hichris123, durron597 Mar 6 at 13:27

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1 Answer 1

You're doing something like this, I'm guessing:

class A {
  private B b = new B();

}

class B {
  private A a = new A();

}

And when you do this, A creates a new B instance which then creates a new A instance which then creates a new B instance, which then creates a new A instance which then creates a new B instance, which then creates a new A instance which then creates a new B instance, which ....

Which causes a recursive nightmare.

A solution: Don't create new objects recursively. Instead pass references of one object to the other via setter methods. For example...

class A {
  private B b;

  public void setB(B b) {
    this.b = b;
  } 
}

class B {
  private A a;

  public void setA(A a) {
    this.a = a;
  } 
}

main code

public static void main(String[] args) {
   A a = new A();
   B b = new B();

   b.setA(a);
   a.setB(b);
}

Or even better, use dependency injection such as can be done with Guice (although I'm not sure if you can use this tool to create objects that refer to each other). Just be sure not to use your a or b variables without checking first to make sure that they're not null.

As an aside, your program design will result in tight coupling of the A and B classes, and you should consider using a design pattern to reduce this coupling such as the observer pattern.


Edit
You state:

I do not understand what this code does. Could you please comment on it a little for me so that I can better understand it? How would I use methods from the other class using this code?

The first bit of code is what I think you're currently doing (I don't know for sure since you're not showing code), and as per my notes, this will cause code to run on for ever until the stackoverflow occurs. My second bit of code removes the code inside of each class that creates an instance of the other class. Instead it has setter methods that set your class references. If you are unfamiliar with getter and setter methods (also known as mutator and accessor methods) I urge you to find and review a tutorial on the subject since they are used a lot in Java. But in brief, class A has a method setB(B b) that allows outside classes to pass a fully created B object into your A object. So rather than A creating a new B object, it lets an outside class pass an already made B object in, so you don't get the recurrence. The same for the class B code.

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I do not understand what this code does. Could you please comment on it a little for me so that I can better understand it? How would I use methods from the other class using this code? –  PWF Aug 14 '13 at 22:16
    
@PWF: see edit to answer. Please read up on setter and getter methods in a tutorial. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 14 '13 at 22:22
    
Okay, I read up a bit on getter and setter methods, and I believe that I understand what you are doing now, but there is still one ting that I do not know: what does 'this' mean? After I get that, I should be good to go, and if I can get my code working, I will mark this as accepted. –  PWF Aug 16 '13 at 0:32
    
I also believe that there is an error with your methods because I get an error when trying to use them as public void, I tried changing them to void, and although it works for things like printing lines, other things like GUI interaction are all screwed up. –  PWF Aug 16 '13 at 0:56
    
@PWF: If there is an error, it may be in how you're trying to use my methods, since as examples, they are written correctly. The this you refer to is the current object that owns the method or constructor that you are in. It is a very basic and key concept that you'll also want to read up more on. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 16 '13 at 0:59

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