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If I write test cases for a function that throws a bunch of exceptions should I add a throws declaration for these exceptions in my test method or should I catch each individual exception. What is the correct way of going about it? I believe try-catch is a better way but in the catch block should I print the stacktrace?

For example, I have a method getGroups(String name) that throws AuthenticationException. If I write a test case to check if an IllegalArgumentException is being thrown when the name parameter is null, how do I handle the AuthenticationException? Do I add it to throws part of my method or should I enclose the exception in a try-catch block.

@Test
public void testGetGroupsWithNull() throws AuthenticationException {
 thrown.expect(IllegalArgumentException.class);
 getGroups(null);
}

In the above test case I just added a throws AuthenticationException, but I would like to know if it is better to enclose the exception in a try-catch block and what shoudld I do after catching the exception. I could print the stack trace.

I am handling the unexpected exception AuthenticationExceptionby not placing it in the 'throws' clause but in a try/catch block.

@Test
public void testGetGroupsWithNull() {
thrown.expect(IllegalArgumentException.class);
try {
  getGroups(null);
} catch(AuthenticationExcption e) {
  Assert.fail("Authentication Exception");
}
}
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did my answer help you or solved your question? – Federico Piazza Aug 10 '14 at 23:24
up vote 4 down vote accepted

JUnit has a great article here: https://github.com/junit-team/junit/wiki/Exception-testing on this very subject. You can do:

@Test(expected= IndexOutOfBoundsException.class) 
public void empty() { 
  new ArrayList<Object>().get(0); 
}

or:

@Test
  public void testExceptionMessage() {
      try {
          new ArrayList<Object>().get(0);
          fail("Expected an IndexOutOfBoundsException to be thrown");
      } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException anIndexOutOfBoundsException) {
          assertThat(anIndexOutOfBoundsException.getMessage(), is("Index: 0, Size: 0"));
      }
  }
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If a JUnit test throws an unexpected exception, it fails. That is the behaviour that you want. So there's no point in EVER using a try/catch block. If you're expecting an exception, use an ExpectedException rule (which you obviously know about, from your code snippet). But whether you're expecting one or not, don't use try/catch.

This means that if your exception is a checked exception, you need a throws clause. In fact, you'll often need a throws clause on your test method, even when you're NOT expecting the exception to be thrown, just because your test calls a method that can SOMETIMES throw a checked exception. I have got into the habit of writing throws Exception on every single test method. There is no reason not to; and it's just one less thing to worry about.

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I just want to make sure I understand what you're saying. In this particular case or in general as AuthenticationException is a checked exception, I should add the exception to the 'throws' clause of the method. I shouldn't be handling this exception in a try/catch block as the test case will pass even when a AuthenticationException is thrown. – user12222 Aug 15 '13 at 0:34
    
In this particular case, if you DO handle the exception, in addition to dealing with it via an ExpectedException rule, then the test will fail. That's because the ExpectedException rule is for making sure that an exception really does get thrown, and not caught. So, do NOT use try/catch in this test method, otherwise it will fail. And, in general, do NOT use try/catch in ANY test method, because there's no need to, and it just adds noise to your test. – David Wallace Aug 15 '13 at 0:52
    
I am a bit confused now. But didn't you say that it was the behaviour of a JUnit test to fail when an unexpected exception occurs. So if I add AuthenticationException to the throws clause of the method the test case passes even though an unexpected exception is thrown. On the other hand if I handle the unexpected exception in a try/catch block, and force the testing method to throw an unexpected exception, then the test fails. – user12222 Aug 15 '13 at 14:17
    
What you put in the throws clause doesn't affect whether the test passes or fails; it only affects whether the method compiles. When I said "unexpected exception", I meant one that you haven't set up in your ExpectedException rule. – David Wallace Aug 15 '13 at 14:19

The annotation is more communicative.

It signals what the test expects to happen without forcing the reader to read the code.

Any single test should only expect a single exception to be thrown, because each test should be testing a single behavior. A single behavior can only throw one exception.

If any other exception is thrown it's a test failure. The test method signature must reflect any possible checked exceptions, of course, as would real code calling that same method.

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Using the rule of writing as little code as possible to solve the problem, your first code snippet wins. So yes, put the AuthenticationException into your test method's throws clause. It is more succinct and readable.

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I've just looking for the same question since I'm dealing with your topic and I found a good explanation for unit test best practices. A little extraction from the article can help you.

It is unnecessary to write your own catch blocks that exist only to fail a test because the JUnit framework takes care of the situation for you. For example, suppose you are writing unit tests for the following method:

final class Foo {
  int foo(int i) throws IOException;
}

Here we have a method that accepts an integer and returns an integer and throws an IOException if it encounters an error. Here is the wrong way to write a unit test that confirms that the method returns three when passed seven:

// Don't do this - it's not necessary to write the try/catch!
@Test
public void foo_seven()
{
  try
  {
    assertEquals(3, new Foo().foo(7));
  }
  catch (final IOException e)
  {
    fail();
  }
}

The method under test specifies that it can throw IOException, which is a checked exception. Therefore, the unit test won't compile unless you catch the exception or declare that the test method can propagate the exception. The second alternative is preferred because it results in shorter and more focused tests:

// Do this instead
@Test
public void foo_seven() throws Exception
{
  assertEquals(3, new Foo().foo(7));
}

We declare that the test method throws Exception rather than throws IOException. The JUnit framework will make sure that this test fails if any exception occurs during the invocation of the method under test - there's no need to write your own exception handling.

You can find more about JUnit best practices like above in this article: http://www.kyleblaney.com/junit-best-practices/

Hope to help.

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