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I am trying to read a line from a file and print it.

char *readLine(int n, FILE *file) {
    int i;
    int BUF=255;
    char temp[BUF];
    char puffer[BUF];
    for(i = 0; i < n-1; i++)
    if(fgets(temp, BUF, file) == NULL)
        return NULL; 

    if(fgets(puffer,BUF,file) == NULL)
        return NULL; 
    return puffer; 
}

I do not get errors if I do following:

char * temp=readLine(2,somefile);

but as soon as I

printf("%s",temp);

valgrind returns following error

Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
at 0x402EC04:strcrnul(in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-x86-linux.so)
...
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possible duplicate of Why is my variable corrupt after returning from a function? –  hetepeperfan Aug 14 '13 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are returning an array of characters that lives on the stack. When readLine finishes executing, the memory for puffer is automatically gone.

You need to allocate memory on the heap. One quick fix is to do this:

char *readLine(int n, FILE *file) {
int i;
int BUF=255;
char temp[BUF];
char puffer[BUF];
char* returned_string;
for(i = 0; i < n-1; i++)
    if(fgets(temp, BUF, file) == NULL)
        return NULL; 

if(fgets(puffer,BUF,file) == NULL)
    return NULL; 

returned_string = malloc (strlen (puffer) + 1);
strcpy (returned_string, puffer);

return returned_string; 
}

You don't really need two buffers in your function, though.

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thank you very very much! this is the solution! –  SevenOfNine Aug 14 '13 at 22:36
    
As I said, it's not a very elegant solution. You can use only one buffer in your function, not two. Also, don't forget to free the allocated memory when you no longer need the string, or you'll have a memory leak. –  verbose Aug 14 '13 at 22:36

You have to malloc the neccessary memory. Now you are returning a pointer to a variable on the function stack. That will probably not exist anymore after the function returns, therefore you exibit undefined behavior.

change

char puffer[BUF];

into

char* puffer = malloc(BUF);

and don't forget to free this memory after you are ready with this.

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yes thats also a very good solution! Thank you –  SevenOfNine Aug 14 '13 at 22:45

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