Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible (in C#) to cause a checked(...) expression to have dynamic "scope" for the overflow checking? In other words, in the following example:

int add(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}
void test()
{
    int max = int.MaxValue;
    int with_call = checked(add(max, 1)); // does NOT cause OverflowException
    int without_call = checked(max + 1);  // DOES cause OverflowException
}

because in the expression checked(add(max, 1)), a function call causes the overflow, no OverflowException is thrown, even though there is an overflow during the dynamic extent of the checked(...) expression.

Is there any way to cause both ways to evaluate int.MaxValue + 1 to throw an OverflowException?

EDIT: Well, either tell me if there is a way, or give me a better way to do this (please).

The reason I think I need this is because I have code like:

void do_op(int a, int b, Action<int, int> forSmallInts, Action<long, long> forBigInts)
{
    try
    {
        checked(forSmallInts(a, b));
    }
    catch (OverflowException)
    {
        forBigInts((long)a, (long)b);
    }
}
...
do_op(n1, n2, 
    (int a, int b) => Console.WriteLine("int: " + (a + b)),
    (long a, long b) => Console.WriteLine("long: " + (a + b)));

I want this to print int: ... if a + b is in the int range, and long: ... if the small-integer addition overflows. Is there a way to do this that is better than simply changing every single Action (of which I have many)?

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't seem possible but I have a hard time imagining a real practical use for this. There is something wrong with your function when the caller has to control overflow checking. –  Henk Holterman Aug 14 '13 at 22:52
1  
I don't think there's going to be an easy way. Using a checked context causes the compiler to emit a different IL instruction (add.ovf vs add) –  mike z Aug 14 '13 at 22:52
    
I tried forcing the compiler to inline the methods using MethodImpl, but that failed too. I mention it because maybe it will spark an idea for you. –  Matt Dotson Aug 20 '13 at 0:21
    
What you are trying to do is specifically mentioned in ECMA specs as not supported tutorials.csharp-online.net/… –  Amit Mittal Aug 23 '13 at 11:09
    
It looks like perfect example for Aspect Oriented Programming usage. You can also check for Contracts feature of .NET 4.0. –  Michael Cwienczek Aug 24 '13 at 3:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+25

To be short, no it is not possible for checked blocks or expressions to have dynamic scope. If you want to apply this in the entirety of your code base you should look to adding it to your compiler options.

Checked expressions or checked blocks should be used where the operation is actually happening.

    int add(int a, int b)
    {
        int returnValue = 0;

        try
        {
            returnValue = checked(a + b);
        }
        catch(System.OverflowException ex)
        {
            //TODO: Do something with exception or rethrow
        }

        return returnValue;
    }

    void test()
    {
        int max = int.MaxValue;
        int with_call = add(max, 1);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is the simplest and most correct answer ("you can't do it. put checked where it is _used"). Thanks! –  feralin Aug 27 '13 at 13:14

You shouldn't catch exceptions as part of the natural flow of your program. Instead, you should anticipate the problem. There are quite a few ways you can do this, but assuming you just care about int and long and when the addition overflows:

EDIT: Using the types you mention below in your comment instead of int and long:

void Add(RFSmallInt a, RFSmallInt b)
{
    RFBigInt result = new RFBigInt(a) + new RFBigInt(b);
    Console.WriteLine(
        (result > RFSmallInt.MaxValue ? "RFBigInt: " : "RFSmallInt: ") + result);   
}

This makes an assumption that you have a constructor for RFBigInt that promotes a RFSmallInt. This should be trivial as BigInteger has that same for long. There is also an explicit cast from BigInteger to long that you can use to "demote" the value if it is does not overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry; the int and long were just an example. I chose to make it simpler in the example so that I could get my specific question across. –  feralin Aug 15 '13 at 2:15
    
Are you using only integer types? You can overload the method to work with bytes and shorts as well. –  lukegravitt Aug 15 '13 at 2:26
    
I'm actually using wrapper types; RFSmallInt contains long, RFBigInt contains System.Numerics.BigInteger. –  feralin Aug 15 '13 at 2:55

An exception should be an exception, not the usual program flow. But lets not care about that for now :)

The direct answer to you question I believe is no, but you can always work yourself around the problem. I'm posting a small part of some of the ninja stuff I made when implementing unbounded integers (in effect a linked list of integers) which could help you.

This is a very simplistic approach for doing checked addition manually if performance is not an issue. Is quite nice if you can overload the operators of the types, ie you control the types.

public static int SafeAdd(int left, int right)
{
if (left == 0 || right == 0 || left < 0 && right > 0 || right < 0 && left > 0)
    // One is 0 or they are both on different sides of 0
    return left + right;
else if (right > 0 && left > 0 && int.MaxValue - right > left)
    // More than 0 and ok
    return left + right;
else if (right < 0 && left < 0 && int.MinValue - right < left)
    // Less than 0 and ok
    return left + right;
else
    throw new OverflowException();
}

Example with your own types:

public struct MyNumber 
{
  public MyNumber(int value) { n = value; }

  public int n; // the value

  public static MyNumber operator +(MyNumber left, MyNumber right)
  {
    if (left == 0 || right == 0 || left < 0 && right > 0 || right < 0 && left > 0)
      // One is 0 or they are both on different sides of 0
      return new MyNumber(left.n + right.n); // int addition
    else if (right > 0 && left > 0 && int.MaxValue - right > left)
      // More than 0 and ok
      return new MyNumber(left.n + right.n); // int addition
    else if (right < 0 && left < 0 && int.MinValue - right < left)
      // Less than 0 and ok
      return new MyNumber(left.n + right.n); // int addition
    else
      throw new OverflowException();
  }

  // I'm lazy, you should define your own comparisons really
  public static implicit operator int(MyNumber number) { return number.n; }
}

As I stated earlier, you will lose performance, but gain the exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm missing something obvious here, but I fail to see what SafeAdd does that isn't done with checked(left+right).. You still throw when it overflows, but instead of a single IL instruction, you do dozens of comparisons before coming to the same conclusion & result as checked() would –  Isak Savo Aug 23 '13 at 19:07
    
In that sense it is useless, but he wanted to be able to pass an action as a function argument which still throws the exception. –  flindeberg Aug 24 '13 at 7:08

You could use Expression Tree & modify it to introduce Checked for math operator & execute it. This sample is not compiled and tested, you will have to tweak it little more.

   void  CheckedOp (int a, int b, Expression <Action <int, int>> small, Action <int, int> big){
         var smallFunc = InjectChecked (small);
         try{
               smallFunc(a, b);
         }catch (OverflowException oe){
               big(a,b);
         }
   }


   Action<int, int> InjectChecked( Expression<Action<int, int>> exp )
   {
          var v = new CheckedNodeVisitor() ;
          var r = v.Visit ( exp.Body);
          return ((Expression<Action<int, int>> exp) Expression.Lambda (r, r. Parameters) ). Compile() ;
   }


   class CheckedNodeVisitor : ExpressionVisitor {

           public CheckedNodeVisitor() {
           }

           protected override Expression VisitBinary( BinaryExpression be ) {
                  switch(be.NodeType){
                        case ExpressionType.Add:   
                                return Expression.AddChecked( be.Left, be.Right);
                  }
                  return be;
           }
   }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.