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I am frequently wishing I could do something like this in c:

val1 |= 0b00001111; //clear high nibble
val2 &= 0b01000000; //set bit 7
val3 |= ~0b00010000; //clear bit 5

Having this syntax seems like an incredibly useful addition to C with no downsides that I can think of, and it seems like a natural thing for a low level language where bit-twiddling is fairly common.

Edit: I'm seeing some other great alternatives but they all fall apart when there is a more complex mask. For example, if reg is a register that controls I/O pins on a microcontroller, and I want to set pins 2, 3, and 7 high at the same time I could write reg = 0x46; but I had to spend 10 seconds thinking about it (and I'll likely have to spend 10 seconds again every time I read those code after a not looking at it for a day or two) or I could write reg = (1 << 1) | (1 << 2) | (1 << 6); but personally I think that is way less clear than just writing `reg = 0b01000110;' I can agree that it doesn't scale well beyond 8 bit or maybe 16 bit architectures though. Not that I've ever needed to make a 32 bit mask.

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it has hex, which in my opinion is even better, if you spend 10 minutes getting a feel for the relationship –  rogaos Aug 15 '13 at 1:00
    
Should that last comment read "clear bit 4"? (Or better yet, "clear bit 3", since programmers should count from zero by default?) –  Nemo Aug 15 '13 at 1:12
    
IMHO, because there's hex. Much more easy to programmer use than binary numbers. It's very error-prone. Not matter how experient you is. –  The Mask Aug 15 '13 at 1:58
    
Did you already see this? –  jxh Aug 15 '13 at 2:04
    
C has "binary" literals, but only 2 of them: 0, 1. ;-) –  chux Aug 15 '13 at 4:25
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5 Answers 5

According to Rationale for International Standard - Programming Languages C §6.4.4.1 Integer constants

A proposal to add binary constants was rejected due to lack of precedent and insufficient utility.

It's not in standard C, but gcc supports it as an extension, prefixed by 0b or 0B:

 i = 0b101010;

See here for detail.

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Thats awesome but I'm not using GCC :( do you know what its not in the standard? –  Drew Aug 15 '13 at 1:08
    
@Drew See the update. In another word, the committee thinks its usage can be covered by hex constants, I think. –  Yu Hao Aug 15 '13 at 1:24
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This is what pushed hexadecimal to be... hexadecimal. The "... primary use of hexadecimal notation is a human-friendly representation of binary-coded values in computing and digital electronics ...". It would be as follows:

val1 |= 0xF;
val2 &= 0x40;
val3 |= ~0x10;

Hexadecimal:

  1. One hex digit can represent a nibble (4 bytes or half an octal).
  2. Two hex digits can represent a byte (8 bits).
  3. Hex is much more compact when scaling to larger masks.

With some practice, converting between hexadecimal and binary will become much more natural. Try writing out your conversions by hand and not using an online bin/hex notation converter -- then in a couple days it will become natural (and quicker as a result).

Aside: Even though binary literals are not a C standard, if you compile with GCC it is possible to use binary literals, they should be prefixed with '0b' or '0B'. See the official documentation here for further information. Example:

int b1 = 0b1001; // => 9
int b2 = 0B1001; // => 9
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Yes that is what I always end up doing instead, but I always have to do a bunch of calculations in my to remember what binary is what in hax. Especially if I want to eg. clear the lowest 6 bits. And I agree that binary literals would get long for 32 bit platforms, but in that case you can just not use them. –  Drew Aug 15 '13 at 1:06
3  
Thinking in hex becomes second nature after a little practice. Hex also has the advantage that it is easier to read than binary. –  markgz Aug 15 '13 at 1:08
    
@Drew, I understand your point of view as it may be visually much easier to think about for smaller masks. Once you have practiced enough it will come fairly natural (as everything comes in life). I recommend doing all calculations out by hand and double check yourself on a calculator when creating masks so that you can get better and converting between the two notations. –  Jacob Pollack Aug 15 '13 at 1:09
    
How much mental math does it really take to imagine the binary value represented by a hex number? Of all the operations/calculations that a good programmer needs to do in their head, I think this one is one of the simplest. –  lurker Aug 15 '13 at 1:40
    
+1 I don't knew really that's the primary use of hex notation. Good know! –  The Mask Aug 15 '13 at 1:59
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All of your examples can be written even more clearly:

val1 &= (1 << 4) - 1; //clear high nibble
val2 |= (1 << 6); //set bit 6
val3 &=~(1 << 3); //clear bit 3

(I have taken the liberty of fixing the comments to count from zero, like Nature intended.)

Your compiler will fold these constants, so there is no performance penalty to writing them this way. And these are easier to read than the 0b... versions.

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@Jerry Well, that will teach me not to stop thinking after the first error. Thanks –  Nemo Aug 15 '13 at 1:59
    
No problem [filler]. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 15 '13 at 2:08
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I think readability is a primary concern. Although low-level, it's human beings who read and maintain your code, not machine.

Is it easy for you to figure out that you mistakenly typed 0b1000000000000000000000000000000(0x40000000), where you really mean 0b10000000000000000000000000000000(0x80000000) ?

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This seems like the best reason so far. Still, though, you don't have to use binary in those cases. And how often do you make a 32 bit mask anyway? –  Drew Aug 15 '13 at 1:31
    
Since they have a better alternative(hexdecimal) in most cases, I guess the committee just close the door to such mistakes by not providing it. –  Eric Z Aug 15 '13 at 1:47
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If you don't need an actual literal, you can do something like this:

#define B_(x) strtoull(#x, 0, 2)

unsigned char low_nibble = B_(00001111);
unsigned char bit_7 = B_(01000000);
unsigned char bit_5 = B_(00010000);

val1 |= low_nibble;
val2 &= bit_7;
val3 |= ~bit_5;
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