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Why is it that some objects keep their identities while others change at each initialization like so?

>>> id(2 ** 850)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 850)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 850)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 850)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 851)
26826624
>>> id(2 ** 851)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 851)
26826624
>>> id(2 ** 851)
26826480
>>> id(2 ** 851)
26826624

I've also wrote the following to find a pattern but the result seems meaningless. I can't see a pattern.

def identifier():
    ids = list()
    i = 0
    while i < 1000:
        a = id(2 ** i)
        b = id(2 ** i)
        c = id(2 ** i)
        d = id(2 ** i)
        if a == b == c == d:
           ids.append(i)
        i += 1
    print(ids)

identifier()

and the result is

    [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 18, 23, 24, 28, 31, 32, 33, 35, 37, 38, 39, 41, 42,
 43, 44, 45, 47, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 55, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68,
 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90,
 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109,
 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130, 132,
 134, 136, 138, 140, 142, 144, 146, 148, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158,
 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175,
 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 182, 184, 186, 188, 190, 192, 194, 196, 198, 200, 202, 204,
 206, 208, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224,
 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 242,
 244, 246, 248, 250, 252, 254, 256, 258, 260, 262, 264, 266, 268, 270, 271, 272, 273,
 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290,
 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 302, 304, 306, 308, 310, 312, 314,
 316, 318, 320, 322, 324, 326, 328, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339,
 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356,
 357, 358, 359, 360, 362, 364, 366, 368, 370, 372, 374, 376, 378, 380, 382, 384, 386,
 388, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405,
 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 422, 424,
 426, 428, 430, 432, 434, 436, 438, 440, 442, 444, 446, 448, 450, 451, 452, 453, 454,
 455, 456, 457, 458, 459, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466, 467, 468, 469, 470, 471,
 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478, 479, 480, 482, 484, 486, 488, 490, 492, 494, 496,
 498, 500, 502, 504, 506, 508, 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519, 520,
 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537,
 538, 539, 540, 542, 544, 546, 548, 550, 552, 554, 556, 558, 560, 562, 564, 566, 568,
 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 575, 576, 577, 578, 579, 580, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586,
 587, 588, 589, 590, 591, 592, 593, 594, 595, 596, 597, 598, 599, 600, 602, 604, 606,
 608, 610, 612, 614, 616, 618, 620, 622, 624, 626, 628, 630, 631, 632, 633, 634, 635,
 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 643, 644, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 650, 651, 652,
 653, 654, 655, 656, 657, 658, 659, 660, 662, 664, 666, 668, 670, 672, 674, 676, 678,
 680, 682, 684, 686, 688, 690, 691, 692, 693, 694, 695, 696, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701,
 702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, 709, 710, 711, 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 717, 718,
 719, 720, 722, 724, 726, 728, 730, 732, 734, 736, 738, 740, 742, 744, 746, 748, 750,
 751, 752, 753, 754, 755, 756, 757, 758, 759, 760, 761, 762, 763, 764, 765, 766, 767,
 768, 769, 770, 771, 772, 773, 774, 775, 776, 777, 778, 779, 780, 782, 784, 786, 788,
 790, 792, 794, 796, 798, 800, 802, 804, 806, 808, 810, 811, 812, 813, 814, 815, 816,
 817, 818, 819, 820, 821, 822, 823, 824, 825, 826, 827, 828, 829, 830, 831, 832, 833,
 834, 835, 836, 837, 838, 839, 840, 842, 844, 846, 848, 850, 852, 854, 856, 858, 860,
 862, 864, 866, 868, 870, 871, 872, 873, 874, 875, 876, 877, 878, 879, 880, 881, 882,
 883, 884, 885, 886, 887, 888, 889, 890, 891, 892, 893, 894, 895, 896, 897, 898, 899,
 900, 902, 904, 906, 908, 910, 912, 914, 916, 918, 920, 922, 924, 926, 928, 930, 931,
 932, 933, 934, 935, 936, 937, 938, 939, 940, 941, 942, 943, 944, 945, 946, 947, 948,
 949, 950, 951, 952, 953, 954, 955, 956, 957, 958, 959, 960, 962, 964, 966, 968, 970,
 972, 974, 976, 978, 980, 982, 984, 986, 988, 990, 991, 992, 993, 994, 995, 996, 997,
 998, 999]

I can see why there is a consistency until 2 ** 8 since python caches the numbers from -5 to 256 but I can't understand the behavior after this. Are there any python gurus out there who can shed some light on this?

Edit: This strange behavior piqued my interest so I would like to learn the reason of this. I've checked mailing lists and the source codes but It doesn't say anything more than caching small integers and allocating blocks of int objects to accelerate the process of allocating and deallocating int objects in programs.

>>> id(2 ** 950)
139686876237120
>>> id(2 ** 950)
139686876237120
>>> id(2 ** 951)
27205680
>>> id(2 ** 951)
27206160
>>> id(2 ** 951)
27206320
>>> id(2 ** 950)
139686876237120
>>> id(2 ** 950)
139686876237120

Why is that after the first int object above is destroyed it gets the same memory address when it gets reconstructed at the last line?

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Do a search for 'python interning' here on SO. You'll get plenty of discussions on why this happens. –  JS. Aug 27 '13 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's an implementation detail. The id in CPython is basically the memory address of the object. Sometimes temporary objects that are created and destroyed in the same line of execution (like the result of 2**850) will have the same address in the next line of execution. Don't rely on the value!

Here's an interesting case:

>>> id(object())
34418928
>>> id(object())
34418928
>>> id(object()),id(object())
(34418912, 34418912)
>>> id(object()) == id(object())
True
>>> object() is object()
False

Though the objects look like they have the same id, it is because they happened to get created and destroyed in the same area of memory. Even equality comparison of the id's of two object instances returns True. But in reality (via is, the correct way of comparing two objects) the two objects are different.

share|improve this answer
    
About that example: >>> id(object()),id(object()) Is the first object destroyed before the expression after comma is evaluated? Since you said they get created and destroyed in the same area of memory. –  user2662020 Aug 15 '13 at 2:20
    
It seems to be. as I said...implementation detail. For the last statement, I expect the whole expression is evaluated before the two objects are freed; but for the tuple, one is created, passed to id and destroyed when the call returns before moving on to the next expression. –  Mark Tolonen Aug 15 '13 at 4:49

Quoting the docs for id:

Two objects with non-overlapping lifetimes may have the same id() value.

When you get the same id() results, it doesn't mean you have the same object. In fact, two unequal numbers may have the same ID if one of the objects is deallocated before the other comes into existence. Whether the IDs were the same in any of your tests was an implementation detail.

share|improve this answer

Most ints are dynamically created like regular objects. As long as you hold a reference to the object, it will keep its id. In your case, the int is destroyed when id() returns because there are no remaining refs. That some may have the same id is just that the same memory address was reallocated for the next object.

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