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for example,

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {

    int x = 5;
    double y = 6;
    int z = x+y;

    printf("size of z = %d bytes",sizeof(z));

    return 0;
}

The output is 4 bytes, why doesn't it converted to double and takes 8 bytes of memory as a double.

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2  
Because it's an int. z will not be cast to double. –  Maroun Maroun Aug 15 '13 at 8:04
    
also your printf format is not correct. It should be %zu because the type of sizeof is size_t and should include a \n at the end. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 15 '13 at 8:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Read the comments which describe your code behavior:

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {

int x = 5;
double y = 6;
int z = x+y; // 5 (int, 4 bytes) + 6 (double, 8 bytes)
             // converting `int` to `double` when adding them ()
             // 5.0 (double, 8 bytes) + 6.0 (double, 8 bytes)
             // 11.0 (double, 8 bytes)
             // But! `z` is of type `int`, so it will not convert to `double`
             // Then 11.0 converts to 11 because `z`... is of type `int`! 
            /// read "Double-precision floating-point format" and you'll see why.
             // So,  z = 11 (`z` is of type `int`, so it's size is *4* bytes )
             // Here is your 4 bytes instead of 8! ;)

printf("size of z = %d bytes",sizeof(z));
return 0;

}

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the person who posted the question says "The output is 4 bytes, why doesn't it converted to double and takes 8 bytes of memory as a double".. what are you trying to answer? –  Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 8:22
    
he is getting 4 bytes and not 8.. –  Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 8:22
    
@Abhishek, sorry, didn't understood the question right... –  Yulian Khlevnoy Aug 15 '13 at 8:24
    
i meant that the questioner is saying that he received the output of 4 bytes... why isnt it 8 bytes.. he wants to understand why the output is 4 bytes... and you are explaining why it is 8 bytes.. read question carefully once more.. –  Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 8:25
    
still the logic is incorrect..i l modify it wait.. –  Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 8:29

No, sizeof z will always be sizeof(int)

When you do:

int z = x+y;

The value of x will be converted to double since y is double, but this won't change x. And the result of x+y(type double) will be converted to int, and assigned to z.

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you said that x will be converted to double but this won't change x, how??!! @YuHao –  Armia Wagdy Aug 15 '13 at 8:30
1  
@ArmiaWagdy: Note value of x promoted to double in expression only, it doesn't means x itself covered to double, C/C++ are "statically typed language" (in contrast of "dynamic typed language" e.g. Python) that means type of a variable can't be change. Also try sizeof(x + y) you will get == sizeof(double). –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 15 '13 at 8:34
    
@ArmiaWagdy you may like to read: Dynamic type languages versus static type languages –  Grijesh Chauhan Aug 15 '13 at 8:38
    
@YuHao right, when 5 is promoted to double, it will be 5.0, how it will be saved in memory ? for example 5 will be 00000101 . 5.0 will be what?, sorry for being foll –  Armia Wagdy Aug 15 '13 at 9:08
    
@ArmiaWagdy Google about the difference between lvalue and rvalue, that should be helpful. –  Yu Hao Aug 15 '13 at 11:08

Because z is still 4 byte int, and its value is (int)(5 + 6.0)

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You have defined z to be integer. While doing "x+y", the addition does happen on double size but when assigning it performs implicit conversion and truncate the result to fit in size of z.

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Since you declared z being int it' ll be int. And every possible conversion will be from whatever type to int:

  int z = whatever (legal) formula you put here; 
  sizeof(z); /* <- 4 */

on the contrary temporal value of x + y is double which is finally converted to int

  int x = 5;
  double y = 6;
  int z = x+y; /* x + y = 11.0 since y = 6.0; which is converted to 11*/
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when the variable x is promoted to double, does it take 64 bytes instead of 32. and if not how can the compiler handle this implicit conversion ? –  Armia Wagdy Aug 15 '13 at 17:01
    
As far as I know, just truncate (throw away fraction part, while preserving integer part) –  Dmitry Bychenko Aug 16 '13 at 5:37

Your output is 4 because you are declaring int z. z will always be of type int.

Even if the expression x+y is of type double because y is a double, this expression will be implicitly converted to int because you try to assign int to and int.

Check this code :

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int x = 4;
    double y = 5;
    int z = x+y;

    printf( "%d %d \n", sizeof(z), sizeof( x + y ) );
    return 0;
}

The output will be 4 8 because z is of type int and the expression x+y of type double. Example

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how can you say that the expression of x+y of type double, what does it mean ??!! –  Armia Wagdy Aug 15 '13 at 16:53

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