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This question already has an answer here:

I have following method,

public Response process(Applicant appl)
{

    String responseString;
    String requestString;
    requestString = createRequestString(appl);
    responseString = sendRequest(requestString);
    Response response = parseResponse(responseString);
    return response;
}

Here I want to return both responseString and response, one is of type String and other is an object of class Response. How can I do this?

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marked as duplicate by Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera, Steve Barnes, keyboardsurfer, Frank van Puffelen, Travis Aug 16 '13 at 12:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Why not have the ˋResponseˋ class also keep hold of ˋresponseStringˋ? It looks like the obvious container for that. – Joachim Sauer Aug 15 '13 at 8:06
1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/17830949/… – hmjd Aug 15 '13 at 8:07
1  
Same question as here stackoverflow.com/questions/2439782/… – HpTerm Aug 15 '13 at 8:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No you cannot.

You can only return the type you mentioned in method signature.

What you can do is,

Create a field in Response class called responseString and add setters and getters.

public Response process(Applicant appl)
{

    String responseString;
    String requestString;
    requestString = createRequestString(appl);
    responseString = sendRequest(requestString);
    Response response = parseResponse(responseString);
    response.setResponseString(responseString);
    return response;
}
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1  
In the general case this solution will fail as you usually cannot change the Response class. E.g. if it is a JSONObject or similar. This may be good for the OP but not a good solution for most cases. – allprog Aug 15 '13 at 8:37
    
@allprog Yes it is purely depends..If you are able to change The response object this is a solution.OP not mentioned that I cannot change the response object. – sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Aug 15 '13 at 8:39

You can create a custom type, which holds both of the values.

public class ResponseObject {
    private String responseString;

    private Response response;

    //accessors
}

and then return an instance of that class as a result.

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you can return array of objects as follows:

public Object[] process(Applicant appl)
{
...

but you need to keep track of index of the inserted objects (String, Response)

Another way, you can return Map<String, Object> having keys representing the values.

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If both the objects are separate entities, the prefered way to do this is via composition:

    String responseString;
    String requestString;
    requestString = createRequestString(appl);
    responseString = sendRequest(requestString);
    Response response = parseResponse(responseString);

    return new compositObj(response, responseString);




  class compositObj{
      Response res;
      String resString;
      compositObj(Response r, String s){
        res = r;
        resString = s;
    }
    //getters setters if needed
}
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You need to create a wrapper class for that. Unlike some other languages the Java language doesn't support tuple return values with automatic unpacking. Simply create a data class like this:

class ResponseData {
    public final String responseString;
    public final Response response;

    public ResponseData(String responseString, Response response) {
        this.responseString = responseString;
        this.response = response;
    }
}
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Java methods are determined by its signatures. There can only be existed one unique signature in a scope.

Method Signature: Two of the components of a method declaration comprise the method signature—the method's name and the parameter types.

As suggested in the description return types are not in signature, so it is impossible to have two methods that differs only by return types.

However, there is several ways to return different object types.

Object type

Return Object type since all classes are type of Object, then cast it to proper type.

public Object process(Applicant appl);

Inheritance

Define a base class and deriveResponse and ResponseString from base

class ResponseBase
{

}

and derive your classes

class Response extends ResponseBase{...}
class ResponseString ResponseBase{...}

and return base class from your method

public ResponseBase process(Applicant appl);

Composition

Wrap your Response and ResponseString to a wrapper class and return it.

class ResponseWrapper
{
    Response response;
    ResponseString responseString;
     //getter setters

}

and return ResponseWrapper from your method

public ResponseWrapper process(Applicant appl);

See also

Design patterns

Defining Methods

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option 1. you can return your CustomeResponse.

public class CustomResponse {

   private String responseString;
   private Response response;

   public void setResponseString(String responseString){
     this.responseString = responseString;
   }
   public String getResponseString(){
     return this.responseString;
   }

   public void setResponse(Response response){
     this.response = response;
   }
   public Response getResponse(){
     return this.response;
   }
}

option 2. you can pass responseString as parameter. as non primitive datatypes passed as argument has the reference of the variable so when you will set responseString, your variable value will be updated.

public Response process(Applicant appl,String responseString)
{
    String requestString;
    requestString = createRequestString(appl);
    responseString = sendRequest(requestString);
    Response response = parseResponse(responseString);
    return response;
}
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