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I'm trying to populate a list of lists within a Parallel.For loop, but when the loop completes the list of lists is empty. What am I doing wrong?

int[] nums = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToArray();
IList<IList<double>> bins = new List<IList<double>>();
Parallel.For<IList<IList<double>>>(0, nums.Length, () => new List<IList<double>>(), (i, loop, bin) =>
    {
        Random random = new Random();
        IList<double> list = new List<double>();
        for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++)
            list.Add(random.NextDouble() + i);
        bin.Add(list);
        return bin;
    }
    ,
    (bin) =>
    {
        lock (bins)
        {
            bins.Concat(bin);    
        }

    }
); 
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This line is wrong:

 bins.Concat(bin);  

That just concatenates two enumerable sequences and returns the concatenated result (which you are throwing away).

I think it should be:

foreach (var x in bin)
    bins.Add(x);
share|improve this answer
    
Do you think the lock has any utility in this scenario? From MS's example (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460703.aspx) it seems like a good idea but I'm not sure. – Johnny Aug 15 '13 at 9:13
1  
I think it's necessary, but because of it I'm not sure if the parallel loop will speed things up much. I definitely recommend doing some careful timings with a Stopwatch (in release build, outside any debugger). – Matthew Watson Aug 15 '13 at 9:19

Part of your problem is from using IList<...> bins instead of List<...> bins. There's no benefit from restricting yourself to the interface in this context.

The minimal change would be this:

//IList<IList<double>> bins = new List<IList<double>>();
List<IList<double>> bins = new List<IList<double>>();

...

  lock (bins)
  {
     bins.AddRange(bin);    
  }

On a side note, Random random = new Random(); inside the tasks means you will have (at least some) identical sub-sequences.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, using List<> instead is definitely better. – Matthew Watson Aug 15 '13 at 9:21

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