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I don't understand how the exponentiation by squaring results in O(log n) multiplications.

It seems to me that you end up doing more than log n multiplications (where n is the size of the exponent).

Example:

              power(2,8)
       /                       \
     pow(2,4)        *          pow(2,4)
    /        \                 /        \      
pow(2,2) * pow(2,2)          pow(2,2) * pow(2,2)
   /               \             /              \
 p(2,1)*p(2,1) p(2,1)*p(2,1)  p(2,1)*p(2,1)    p(2,1)*p(2,1)

That's seven multiplications, just like regular exponentiation.

Here are 3 methods I've tried:

long pow(int base, int exp)
{
  if(exp == 1)
    return base;
  else
    return base * pow(base, exp-1);
}

long pow2(int base, int exp)
{
  if(exp == 1)
    return base;
  else if(exp == 0)
    return 1;
  else
    if(exp % 2 == 0)
      return pow2(base * base, exp/2);
    else
      return base * pow2(base * base, exp/2) ;
}

long pow3(int base, int exp)
{
    if(exp == 1)
        return base;
    int x = pow2(base,exp/2);
        if(exp%2 == 0)
            return x*x;
        else
            return base*x*x;
}

It seems like, once the recursion bottoms out, the the same number of multiplications are performed...

share|improve this question
    
One multiplication is O(1)? Is this homework? –  Jori Aug 15 '13 at 9:54
    
Not homework. Graduated from school, just a curious fellow prepping for interviews –  ordinary Aug 15 '13 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should only consider one branch, since you save the result and don't recompute branches. Only the following multiplications are actually done:

              power(2,8)
       /                       \
     pow(2,4)        [*]        pow(2,4)
    /        \                 /        \      
pow(2,2) [*] pow(2,2)        pow(2,2) * pow(2,2)
   /               \             /              \
 p(2,1)[*]p(2,1) p(2,1)*p(2,1)  p(2,1)*p(2,1)    p(2,1)*p(2,1)
share|improve this answer

Let's look at your examle 2^8. On first step you have to compute 2^4. When you have the result just multiply it by itself. You do not have to calculate the whole tree, because you already know the result. Let's look at your example tree. In this case you have to calculate only left-most tree. That means only 2^4, 2^2, 2^1 and then to use the results to get 2^8.

Also your function should be something like this:

int power(int base, int power) {
    if (power == 0)
        return 1;
    if (power == 1)
        return base;
    int result = power(base, power / 2);
    result *= result;
    if (power % 2 == 1)
         result *= base;
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
okay thanks.. i see now. In my pow2() function, am I calculating the whole tree? –  ordinary Aug 15 '13 at 10:07
    
In your funcion you have pow2(base * base, power / 2) which mean 2^8 = 4^4 and there is no any optimization. The point is to calculate it once and then use it. –  Kamen Stoykov Aug 15 '13 at 10:32

You're showing a binary tree, but your recursive function doesn't call itself twice, only once, so it's only traversing a single logN path.

Also, recursion is stupid (slow, complex, fragile) for this algorithm. Just loop over the bits of exponent:

long pow(long base, int exp) {
    long result = 1;
    while (exp > 0) {
        if (exp & 1) result *= base;
        exp >>= 1;
        base *= base;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
I disagree with the complex/fragile aspect of recursion (slow is another matter, which depends on whether the function is tail-recursive and optimized as such by compilers). –  Matthieu M. Aug 15 '13 at 10:25
1  
No, it's not stupid. This is more like an optimization, the algorithm is much easier to deduce, understand and explain recursively. –  IVlad Aug 16 '13 at 9:20

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