Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

#include<stdio.h>
int *sample();
int main(void)
{
  int *p;
  p=sample();
  printf("%d",*p);
  return 0;
}

int *sample()
{
  int *p,x=10;
  p=&x;
  return p;
}

In the code above x is local variable. When I compiled above with gcc I'm getting output:

10

A local variable is only alive in the function where it is declared and as the control comes out of function local variable should be de-allocated. But this is not happening. wWy its printing 10? Can anyone explain this behaviour?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Blastfurnace, Mat, Dennis Meng, Joseph Quinsey, Blackbelt Mar 6 at 8:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You're stealing the hotel key –  Ingo Leonhardt Aug 15 '13 at 10:19
    
For anyone who doesn't get the reference @Ingo made, see stackoverflow.com/questions/6441218/… which is also a great answer –  jcoder Aug 15 '13 at 10:29
    
Ah yes, that one. Still a fun analogy to read. –  Dennis Meng Dec 30 '13 at 3:36

4 Answers 4

While the behavior is officially undefined in the C standard, in practice values in memory stick around until something else overwrites them.

More details can be found at Why do I have values in my array that I didn't assign?

share|improve this answer

I modified your program just a little. See below.

#include<stdio.h>
int *sample();

void donothing ();

int main(void)
{
  int *p;
  p=sample();

  donothing();

  printf("in main(), *p = %d\n",*p);
  return 0;
}

int *sample()
{
  int *p,x=10;
  p=&x;

  return p;
}

void donothing ()
{
  int x[10], y;

  y = 17;
  return;
}

When I run it now, here's what I get ...

amrith@amrith-vbox:~/so$ ./stack 
in main(), *p = 17
amrith@amrith-vbox:~/so$ 

It is never safe to return the address of a local variable as that is typically established on the stack and can be overwritten.

share|improve this answer

The program has undefined behavior. Returning reference of a local variable has unpredictable behavior and you were just unlucky that the value was still around.

share|improve this answer

There's no garbage collection in C.

x,a local variable, cease to exist, when sample exits

Your case is an Undefined Behavior.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.