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I have a javascript function. The 3rd condition is not working, it works when it's alone in the loop but not with the other conditions, I don't know why. Anybody can help??

function verif(ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6) {
    document.forms["form"].intitule.value = ref1;
    document.forms["form"].montant.value = ref2;
    document.getElementById(ref3).selected = true;

    for (var i = 1; i <= 400; i++) {
        if (document.getElementById("newDay").options[i].text == ref4) {
            document.getElementById("newDay").options[i].selected = true;
        }
        if (document.getElementById("newMonth").options[i].text == ref5) {
            document.getElementById("newMonth").options[i].selected = true;
        }
        if (document.getElementById("newYear").options[i].text == ref6) {
            document.getElementById("newYear").options[i].selected = true;
        }
    }
}
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Probably there's more option elements in #newYear than other selects. When i grows larger than the length of the shortest select element, an error is triggered and execution is stopped. –  Teemu Aug 15 '13 at 10:20
1  
Do you get an error in your console? (e.g. cannot get property text of undefined or something?) Is ref6 set? Does #newYear have more than 400 options? –  Paul S. Aug 15 '13 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

Add each of the condition in its own try catch and see if any of the condition is throwing error. I have added alert to help you debug.

function verif(ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6) {
    document.forms["form"].intitule.value = ref1;
    document.forms["form"].montant.value = ref2;
    document.getElementById(ref3).selected = true;

    for (var i = 1; i <= 400; i++) {
        try{
        if (document.getElementById("newDay").options[i].text == ref4) {
            document.getElementById("newDay").options[i].selected = true;
        }
        }catch(err){
          alert(err);
        }
        try{
        if (document.getElementById("newMonth").options[i].text == ref5) {
            document.getElementById("newMonth").options[i].selected = true;
        }
        }catch(err){
          alert(err);
        }
        try
        {
        if (document.getElementById("newYear").options[i].text == ref6) {
            document.getElementById("newYear").options[i].selected = true;
        }
        }catch(err){
          alert(err);
        }
    }
}
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Warning: This code might produce up to 400 * 3 = 1200 alert dialogs. –  Paul S. Aug 15 '13 at 11:56
    
That depends if exception is thrown or not. Alert is just added to find the exception. Could be replaced console.log method also –  Anand Aug 15 '13 at 11:58

It looks like you're trying to do one loop for all 3 items. The advantage of that is the lower number of required iterations, but you've included no code to ensure that you won't try to look up undefined <option>s. Next, consider how the advantage of using one loop is really to save on the number of iterations, and therefore having two loops, the second picking up where the first ended, will still have the minimal iteration count.

Therefore, if you want to save on loop iterations, you could try something like this, where the items in the loops decrease depending on how far along i is and what has been found already. This does result in some code duplication, though. Note how the loops are sorted in order of months then days then years, because 12 < 31 < x (I'm assuming x is about 400), therefore ensuring that you won't try to look up, e.g. the 20th month, which of course would not exist.

function verif(ref1, ref2, ref3, ref4, ref5, ref6) {
    document.forms["form"].intitule.value = ref1;
    document.forms["form"].montant.value = ref2;
    document.getElementById(ref3).selected = true;

    var i = 0, found = {day: 0, month: 0, year: 0},
        elm = {
            days: document.getElementById("newDay"),
            months: document.getElementById("newMonth"),
            years: document.getElementById("newYear")
        };
    // months length = min(days, months, years)
    while (++i < elm.months.length && !found.months) {
        if (elm.days.options[i].text == ref4) {
            found.days = elm.days.options[i].selected = true;
        }
        if (elm.months.options[i].text == ref5) {
            found.months = elm.months.options[i].selected = true;
        }
        if (elm.years.options[i].text == ref6) {
            found.years = elm.years.options[i].selected = true;
        }
    }
    // days length = min(days, years)
    while (++i < elm.days.length && !found.days) {
        if (elm.days.options[i].text == ref4) {
            found.days = elm.days.options[i].selected = true;
        }
        if (elm.years.options[i].text == ref6) {
            found.years = elm.years.options[i].selected = true;
        }
    }
    // only years left
    while (++i < elm.years.length && !found.years) {
        if (elm.years.options[i].text == ref6) {
            found.years = elm.years.options[i].selected = true;
        }
    }
}

You might also notice I didn't include any break statements, this is because if we find something which will still be looked for in a later loop, we still want to search for the item specific to the current loop, we don't want to skip the other checks for that same iteration and we also don't want to waste time on that later loop. Hence, a piece of code which does a similar action to break is in the <condition> instead.

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